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Mainecoonmaniac
05-08-2012, 06:17 PM
I used to be a commercial shooter and most if not all of the stuff I shot wasn't film worthy anyway :)

Poisson Du Jour
05-08-2012, 06:42 PM
The article is moderately interesting reading. It is though very US- and Kodak-centric. Here and there in Australia — a smaller market, I've learned that E6 and C41 is on the rise and has been for about 14 months or so now. This may not correlate to big film sales, but possibly the use of latent stocks of film, uptake of students or what, I don't know. What is very important is to take such stories as just another piece of information floating about the web. Nothing will buoy the long-term survival (availability is a better word!) of film better than going out there and using it in film cameras, processing it in traditional or poly-hybridised workflow, printing and framing and telling all that only film endures, which it does in truth.

Melbourne, Australia, has a thriving APUG group that gathers maybe a few times each year for outings. Good on you up in Toronto for getting the mechanics of a group meet-up and outing organised. This is what APUG is for, networking and discovering what others are doing. With film. :)

hdeyong
05-08-2012, 07:07 PM
Six years ago, I switched to digital photography, yesterday I bought a mint Canon Elan 7E and ten rolls of Tri-X. I imagine I'll sell everything except a little digital snap shooter for vacation pix in the future, and buy a couple more film bodies. I have no fear of the death of film, because (a) Ilford is enjoying sales increases, (b) new players are actually coming into the market, which means (c) there will be variety and price competition. Let's face it, a large part of the reason Kodak's going under is mismanagement. The decline in film sales isn't helping, but shouldn't the people who virtually invented film photography for everyman AND the digital camera be doing a little better than they are?

MattKing
05-08-2012, 11:10 PM
Admittedly, they are local to me, but I still find this snippet to be good news:

"Rebecca Kaplan, who owns photographic equipment retailer Glazer’s Camera in Seattle, reports that analogue photography products are “still a profit center for our business.” After the market shifted following the introduction of digital photography, Kaplan says, their film photography sales numbers have stayed consistent for the past five years." (Emphasis added by me)

Ken Nadvornick
05-09-2012, 12:26 AM
Agree with Matt. I get into Glazer's Camera every so often when I'm in Seattle.

Across the street in the older analog building, for those who know it. There's always lots of people in there. Or at least lots more than there used to be. The odd thing is, they're always young people. And not young only in comparison to me. College-age young. I feel out of place. Or out of generation.

One young lady saw me rummaging through the Omega enlarger accessory drawers and struck up a nice darkroom conversation. It was a good afternoon. Not only did I get to spend pleasant time with her, but I scored a brand new Omega 6x6 Rapid Shift Glass Carrier for my D5-XL on top of it. She was carrying a brand new Mamiya 7II/80mm outfit. Could'a bought a nice digital camera for that price, said I. Not interested, said she...

Nice to see analog in a continuing cautious rebound these days.

Ken

P.S. Maybe some day we'll bump into each other at Glazer's? Or Kenmore Camera?

tim elder
05-09-2012, 01:48 PM
I thought it was interesting and encouraging that the article pointed out that several magazines and companies will still request film for the certain look that film provides. In this day and age, nearly any straw seems worth grasping.

-Tim

kb3lms
05-09-2012, 03:03 PM
The odd thing is, they're always young people...

It seems to me that it's a lot of the older folk (speaking about amatuer photographers, here) who have completely jumped to the digtible side. Younger people don't seem to be as intensly committed that side of the fence. My teenage and early twenties daughters will often grab one of our SLR's, head out with a roll of 36 and come back having shot it all and then off with dad to process. And they often shoot some pretty good stuff - imagewise that is. They usually get me to scan the negs to post online, but sometimes they ask to print with the enlarger. Phones, of course, are used for snapshots. Each of them has a nice digisnapper but they don't really seem to get used that much any more.

Ham radio seems to be much the same, the older guys are going for the SDRs and the really high priced gear. Younger guys are often not that impressed and very happy with the older rigs.

Maybe it's like older fellows and vettes.

Has anyone else noticed this trend? Sounds like some of you have.

Steve Smith
05-09-2012, 03:25 PM
"Lomography, a company that manufactures analogue cameras and film, says its worldwide sales doubled in 2011, when the company sold two million rolls of film."

Back in the day, that wouldn't have seemed very much, but in today's shrunken market for roll film, that's not too shabby, esp. since most of that is probably 120.

Indeed. I wouldn't mind owning a company which manufactured two million rolls of film per year.


Steve.

bugbugbug
05-09-2012, 05:02 PM
Indeed. I wouldn't mind owning a company which manufactured two million rolls of film per year.


Steve.

Lomography manufactures film? I thought they just re-branded. Where is the Lomography film factory?

CGW
05-09-2012, 05:24 PM
Lomography manufactures film? I thought they just re-branded. Where is the Lomography film factory?

Downtown Lomograd? They rebrand.

Roger Cole
05-09-2012, 08:31 PM
It seems to me that it's a lot of the older folk (speaking about amatuer photographers, here) who have completely jumped to the digtible side. Younger people don't seem to be as intensly committed that side of the fence. My teenage and early twenties daughters will often grab one of our SLR's, head out with a roll of 36 and come back having shot it all and then off with dad to process. And they often shoot some pretty good stuff - imagewise that is. They usually get me to scan the negs to post online, but sometimes they ask to print with the enlarger. Phones, of course, are used for snapshots. Each of them has a nice digisnapper but they don't really seem to get used that much any more.

Ham radio seems to be much the same, the older guys are going for the SDRs and the really high priced gear. Younger guys are often not that impressed and very happy with the older rigs.

Maybe it's like older fellows and vettes.

Has anyone else noticed this trend? Sounds like some of you have.

I wonder if one reason might be that digital is just so much faster than doing your own darkroom work. Of course this doesn't matter if you send it out. But I have a HUGE backlog of negatives unprinted going back at least a year - most have been contacted but that's all -and several sheets of 4x5 and at least a half dozen more rolls of 35mm and 120 to develop. Working a full time job AND having a life with a wife now, AND the fact she likes to travel (she also hugely encourages my photography as I encourage her poetry) AND the fact we're visiting two sets of family in two different states on holidays and special occasions AND the fact I have other hobby interests, there's just no TIME. One problem is that with no running water in my darkroom right now set up and clean up times, already long enough, are extended. It's not like many hobbies I can for an hour here and there as I can. An hour is not enough time to get set up and then cleaned up leaving no time for actually printing, and even two hours means maybe half of it devoted to printing and hardly worth the effort. Digital I could, if I were so inclined, shoot away, process a few images a bit at a time on the computer and save my intermediate steps. I'm not doing that, though I expect to get into some hybrid workflow soonish (what else am I going to do with the 4x5 Ektachrome stashed in the freezer now that Ilfochrome is defunct anyway?)

As a middle aged adult I find my life incredibly rich, but incredibly busy and complicated. I love analog photography but it's just really hard to squeeze in time for it.

WRT ham radio - heck, I lost interest in ham radio many years ago mainly because all the other hams were boring old farts. They knew the technology, which had incredible capacity and potential to connect people in the days before the Internet, but had nothing worth saying and there was almost no one I cared to talk to. The exceptions were a few young guys about my age who were all local and we wore out the 2m repeaters (and upset not a few of the stodgy old guys we called Greyfaces (nod to anyone who catches the reference!) ;)

So you mean to tell me there are young people in ham radio now? Wow. I've been wanting to get back into radio, but my attraction is almost completely to the old gear, stuff I wanted and couldn't afford when I got started in the 70s and older stuff yet that I can actually understand and work on. The old stuff to me has heart and soul in a way that a wunderbrick of ICs never will.


Lomography manufactures film? I thought they just re-branded. Where is the Lomography film factory?

Dirka-Dirkastan, actually. Film, F### YEAH! :D

Alexis M
05-10-2012, 12:04 PM
could be those older folks are more "blazé" or in otherwords have lost the pride in the process and are more interested in a quick result. They have no interest in needing to work for results anymore.And they defend their current position with biased pixel/grain counting "tests". I can relate to having "lost the passion" with my current job but it's not really a good thing...

kb3lms
05-10-2012, 01:59 PM
I can relate to having "lost the passion" with my current job but it's not really a good thing...

Me too. Hence, analog photography! Agreed, it's not really a good thing.


So you mean to tell me there are young people in ham radio now?

No, it is still mostly boring old farts. "Young" people in ham radio are in their early 50's. We do have a few intelligent, enthusiastic souls on our local repeater that I will credit with getting me restarted in analog photography.

Unfortunately, both are dying out dinosaurs of avocations. I would go so far as to say digitable technology has been the downfall of both.

PKM-25
05-11-2012, 06:54 PM
I definitely think the turning one's nose up to film is an old fart thing, I almost never get that from young people, ages 15-30 roughly.

For example, the city of Glenwood Springs, CO built a new high school a few years ago. At the insistence of several teachers, an impressive 7 enlarger station darkroom was built. In the first semester is was 75% full, now there is a waiting list since it is 100% every year. When I talked to some of the students and asked them why they are interested in it several of them said that the whole hype engine behind the digital and internet age is kind of off-putting, one young lady went as far as to say "It all gives me a headache"...

There is now such an enormous difference between what I read on the internet and what I encounter in person that is is almost troubling at times, but for the most part it is a relief. A few months ago, I got invited to become a faculty member of a new media program at a local college who's namesake is that of an author who wrote the book on Mr. Jobs. I met with the Dean of Instruction and while it went well, I implored him to also bring back some form of traditional workflow to the school and told him why I think it is important. He agreed and is looking into it..

Tomorrow I get interviewed by a documentary film maker about Kodachrome, one of the backdrops for B-roll footage will be the now empty store front of what used to be a Wolf Camera, the only place to get a photo printed in one of the most photographed towns on earth. In a town of 6,000 year-round residents, we used to have two full service labs that could turn around up to 8"x10" sheet film in 4 hours, now we have nada.

The winds of change in the industry are still strong enough to push you across the Pacific, it's an all hands on deck kind of thing to keep film around now, but we all know that....

CGW
05-11-2012, 07:05 PM
I definitely think the turning one's nose up to film is an old fart thing, I almost never get that from young people, ages 15-30 roughly.

For example, the city of Glenwood Springs, CO built a new high school a few years ago. At the insistence of several teachers, an impressive 7 enlarger station darkroom was built. In the first semester is was 75% full, now there is a waiting list since it is 100% every year. When I talked to some of the students and asked them why they are interested in it several of them said that the whole hype engine behind the digital and internet age is kind of off-putting, one young lady went as far as to say "It all gives me a headache"...

There is now such an enormous difference between what I read on the internet and what I encounter in person that is is almost troubling at times, but for the most part it is a relief. A few months ago, I got invited to become a faculty member of a new media program at a local college who's namesake is that of an author who wrote the book on Mr. Jobs. I met with the Dean of Instruction and while it went well, I implored him to also bring back some form of traditional workflow to the school and told him why I think it is important. He agreed and is looking into it..

Tomorrow I get interviewed by a documentary film maker about Kodachrome, one of the backdrops for B-roll footage will be the now empty store front of what used to be a Wolf Camera, the only place to get a photo printed in one of the most photographed towns on earth. In a town of 6,000 year-round residents, we used to have two full service labs that could turn around up to 8"x10" sheet film in 4 hours, now we have nada.

The winds of change in the industry are still strong enough to push you across the Pacific, it's an all hands on deck kind of thing to keep film around now, but we all know that....

Thanks for the press release!

Sal Santamaura
05-12-2012, 12:35 PM
Thanks for the press release!If you haven't figured out why people are put off by your attitude, those five sarcastic words sum it up nicely.

I'm as realistic as they come with respect to not only photographic technology, but every other aspect of life as well. However, I don't visit pools just to pee in them. Please join Aristophanes, wherever he/she went.

CGW
05-12-2012, 12:44 PM
If you haven't figured out why people are put off by your attitude, those five sarcastic words sum it up nicely.

I'm as realistic as they come with respect to not only photographic technology, but every other aspect of life as well. However, I don't visit pools just to pee in them. Please join Aristophanes, wherever he/she went.

It's not costing me any sleep. Honest.

mablo
05-12-2012, 01:04 PM
The fact is that within the small film photography market the only section that shows huge growth year after year is the 'toy camera' users. Lomography.org is the world's largest film and film camera retailer by far. Without their financial help we wouldn't have the selection of films available today. I think APUG should take this fact into consideration.

wblynch
05-12-2012, 01:12 PM
What never seems to be taken into condideration is the massive economic depression the US has been through the past 5 years. This affects luxuries like film and processing immensely.

How many companies didn't survive the 1929 depression?

As the depression winds down, people are having a bit more fun and playing with film photography.

Look at the prices of used film gear. It has shot up in the past year. Many objects like bodies and lenses have doubled. Auctions are drawing multiple bids. People will want film for those cameras.

Sal Santamaura
05-12-2012, 04:31 PM
It's not costing me any sleep. Honest.That was obvious from the ongoing behavior. Thus my futile attempt to explain why it should.