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NB23
08-24-2012, 10:56 AM
About me? No.
It's about Ilford and Adox keeping its customers in tune and satisfied. And on the other side there's kodak preparing us all, in a clumzy way, for the worst.

The writing's on the wall and it's clear. And this is kodak's job in action: In 6 months, when the sheep herd will be calmed down, the final announcement will fall. And we'll all be thaking kodak for the great job of keeping us informed. LOL!

NB23
08-24-2012, 11:00 AM
Ok, i'm off this thread now, knowing full well that my opinion is shared by all the people that switched to ilford looong and not so long ago.

This thread made me realize who is really to be thanked. Simon Galley. Good job, dude!
And Mirko. Good job, Dude!

cdkrenzer
08-24-2012, 11:01 AM
Thanks Colleen, we appreciate any communication. Now back to the important stuff. What is your opinion of Digial dental X-Ray technology? I assume this was the question you woke up thinking about this morning.

All - A. I understand the frustration. All I would ask is that you realize that within Kodak, there is a talented, passionate group of people who have worked hard to keep the film business moving forward.

B. I'm going to work with this film team to answer as many of the questions as we can throughout this process. If I can answer a question, I will. If I can't, I will tell you that I can't. I caveat this statement with the fact that I work with a specific business unit and am not privy to what's going on as the corporate level where all of this activity is happening. So more often than not, I probably won't know what's going on.

C. Yes, I have been researching digital dental x-ray technology all morning-fascinating topic.

Ken Nadvornick
08-24-2012, 11:04 AM
Ok, i'm off this thread now, knowing full well that my opinion is shared by all the people that switched to ilford looong and not so long ago.

I switched to Ilford as well, and I DON'T share your opinion.

Ken

cdkrenzer
08-24-2012, 11:05 AM
First of all, thanks for being here.

Second, not directed to Colleen: Ms Krenzer works for a Public Relations agency which at the moment works for Kodak. She or her agency have nothing to do for the bad communication from Kodak in the past. The fact that one person is participating in internet fora to explain what happens is I think a solid testimony that communication from Kodak has now improved. For many, many posts people have complained that there wasn't someone from Kodak participating in fora interacting with final users of the products. Well, at last, we have that someone! Time to rejoice not to grumble about the past.

Third, a question:
Still photography film is part of the sale;
Commercial film is film used in aerial, industrial and printed circuit board, and is not part of the sale;
The question arises: where does motion picture film sits in the picture? Is it part of the sale?

Thanks in advance
Fabrizio

Fabrizio - the motion picture business is NOT part of the sale. And you have the description of the commercial film business correct - those are the heavy duty industrial type usages of film. There was some confusion elsewhere about what constituted "commercial film."

Ken Nadvornick
08-24-2012, 11:11 AM
Hypothetical question, then...

Can the traditional still film business survive on its own without the commercial/motion picture side?

Ken

frotog
08-24-2012, 11:12 AM
Nothing against Colleen as she's just doing her job as a pr person but I'd be highly suspect of any news that kodak leaks about the sale of their film business. In the past when rumors of discontinuance swirled around products that I've relied on my experience is that kodak dissembles the truth for as long as they can.

pbromaghin
08-24-2012, 11:14 AM
Fabrizio - the motion picture business is NOT part of the sale. And you have the description of the commercial film business correct - those are the heavy duty industrial type usages of film. There was some confusion elsewhere about what constituted "commercial film."

Ooooh. I've been wondering this the whole time reading this thread and the one over at RFF. How can this separation be done when both motion and still are created on the same machine? Who gets the machine, the buyer of still, or the keeper of motion? Based on relative volume, I think I know the answer, and it won't mean good things for the people in this forum. We have had it impressed on us by former Kodak employees, just how difficult it has been to replicate a film even at a different Kodak facility, not to mention by a different corporation that will be likely be building its own machines.

railwayman3
08-24-2012, 11:22 AM
I really just wonder why we are spending any more time with Kodak. We have two honest and communicative b&w manufacturers (Ilford and Adox) who appear to be sound businesses and committed to the future. Each offers a good range of products...yes, we'll miss out Tri-x and Plus-x, but surely now is the time to be getting used to the options and supporting these remaining few manufacturers.

(and nothing against Colleen, but she's just a PR person who admits she knows little of corporate policies, so anything she can say at this time is likely "too little, too late". :(

BrianShaw
08-24-2012, 11:26 AM
I really just wonder why we are spending any more time with Kodak.

perhaps because some people still shoot color.

NB23
08-24-2012, 11:26 AM
I switched to Ilford as well, and I DON'T share your opinion.

Ken

Well, let me serve you the smartass comment you served me, just a few moments ago: Knock it off. This isn't all about you.

slumry
08-24-2012, 11:28 AM
Must have Portra!

cdkrenzer
08-24-2012, 11:32 AM
I really just wonder why we are spending any more time with Kodak. We have two honest and communicative b&w manufacturers (Ilford and Adox) who appear to be sound businesses and committed to the future. Each offers a good range of products...yes, we'll miss out Tri-x and Plus-x, but surely now is the time to be getting used to the options and supporting these remaining few manufacturers.

(and nothing against Colleen, but she's just a PR person who admits she knows little of corporate policies, so anything she can say at this time is likely "too little, too late". :(

No offense taken - but let me clarify - I work with a specific product group, not with corporate. Therefore, I am not privy to discussions about how a sale would proceed. What I can tell you is that Kodak is continuing to manufacture the films and papers in its portfolio and will continue to do so. As part of the sale, the intention of the company is to find a buyer who will continue to make the same products and services currently produced. I say "intention" because its early in the process. But licensing the brand is one thing that the company will consider, and it would be a term subject to negotiation. If you look historically at the businesses Kodak has sold, those businesses have been successful.

But really - "Just a PR person?" Ouch :)

MattKing
08-24-2012, 11:34 AM
I really just wonder why we are spending any more time with Kodak. We have two honest and communicative b&w manufacturers (Ilford and Adox) who appear to be sound businesses and committed to the future. Each offers a good range of products...yes, we'll miss out Tri-x and Plus-x, but surely now is the time to be getting used to the options and supporting these remaining few manufacturers.

(and nothing against Colleen, but she's just a PR person who admits she knows little of corporate policies, so anything she can say at this time is likely "too little, too late". :(

Because if Kodak disappears, and no one takes over their business, then:

1) there will be no North American manufacturer of film;
2) there will be no European or North American manufacturer of colour paper;
3) there will be a huge decrease in the market for the ingredients and materials used in the manufacture of the materials we use; and
4) as a result, all the other manufacturers of analogue products will be at a greater disadvantage.

The people at Kodak that actually make the products we like, and the machinery and materials they use, are really important to the worldwide markets.

The management at Kodak are motivated by concerns (stock markets and now, the creditors in bankruptcy) that film and analogue materials can no longer satisfy, but that doesn't mean that Kodak is irrelevant to the smaller markets that are important to us here at APUG.

Ken Nadvornick
08-24-2012, 11:35 AM
perhaps because some people still shoot color.

Yes, exactly. Providing the quality was still there, I would come back to a post-Kodak film manufacturing company for color in a heartbeat.

Ken

JeanLouise
08-24-2012, 11:35 AM
I am new here, but my feeling is it could be a very, very good thing if someone else invests the $ into film business that Kodak has been unable / unwilling to do (to the extent it should). As long as the film formulas remain the same (I understand Kodak will still do the manufacturing as it does today), I am happy that quality remains. Let someone with some imagination and appreciation for the art of film open up some new possibilities for future.

BrianShaw
08-24-2012, 11:51 AM
But really - "Just a PR person?" Ouch :)

Think of it this way... at least nobody called you a spin-doctor! :laugh:

dr5chrome
08-24-2012, 11:58 AM
..so how 'bout it Ron? coming out of retirement ?






This is either terrible news, or great news.

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20120823006226/en/Kodak-Takes-Steps-Successful-Emergence

batwister
08-24-2012, 11:59 AM
I really just wonder why we are spending any more time with Kodak. We have two honest and communicative b&w manufacturers (Ilford and Adox) who appear to be sound businesses and committed to the future.

I think we're lucky to have Colleen at least offering to provide a little clarification here - even if it is a precaution against people bad mouthing Kodak. It's a corporate business, not a 'grass roots' specialist company like Ilford - with whom it's not too much to expect a little communication. People 'waste' their time with Kodak because the products are exceptional and I feel that needs to be emphasised. If you want better communication with the people connected to your media, probably best to take up painting and hang around at your local crafts store! Would you refuse to pay for your meal without first speaking to the chef?

BrianShaw
08-24-2012, 12:01 PM
Because if Kodak disappears, and no one takes over their business, then:


Technically speaking... all that is just as true if someone buys and moves it "offshore".