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cliveh
09-01-2012, 04:54 PM
Can someone explain to me why Moonrise Hernandez is a good photograph, as I donít get it.

Richard Sintchak (rich815)
09-01-2012, 05:02 PM
You have to understand that if you don't get it, that's the point.

Matthew Wagg
09-01-2012, 05:06 PM
ITs because of the beautiful interplay between the sun and the moon and the light on the crosses and village. I have it set as my desktop background and I can stare at it for hours. Its a beautiful photograph.

ic-racer
09-01-2012, 05:20 PM
Can someone explain to me why Moonrise Hernandez is a good photograph, as I donít get it.

How do you know it is a good photograph?

cliveh
09-01-2012, 05:28 PM
How do you know it is a good photograph?

I don't and don't think it is, but it is by Ansel which many people like.

markbarendt
09-01-2012, 05:51 PM
I think it's a reasonable background for a portrait. :whistling:

Leigh B
09-01-2012, 05:53 PM
It's interesting how the presentation changed over the years.
I found a photo of Ansel posing with two versions of the print. The later one has a much darker and more dramatic sky.

http://www.apug.org/forums/attachments/landscape/56470d1346545743-moonrise-hernandez-adams_with_moonrise.jpg.att

It's a "good" photo because people are willing to pay lots of $$$ for an original.
In modern American society, $$$ are the only metric of quality.

- Leigh

eclarke
09-01-2012, 05:56 PM
Ansel Adams, who could beat us all to death with prehistoric equipment and supplies, was extremely excited about this scene..We're all trolling critics and Ansel was an artist..if you don't get it, figure out why you aren't smart enough..EC

cliveh
09-01-2012, 05:59 PM
It's interesting how the presentation changed over the years.

I have a photo of Ansel posing with two versions of the print. The later one has a much darker and more dramatic sky.

It's a "good" photo because people are willing to pay lots of $$$ for an original.
In modern American society, $$$ are the only metric of quality.

- Leigh

But does that make it a good photo, or a $ value photo?

Kevin Kehler
09-01-2012, 06:02 PM
I watched a documentary on Adams, a straight print (no dodging/burning at Grade 2) is very boring and very grey (lack of contrast). I think it is beautiful as there is a contrast between the light crosses and the dark sky. While I don't find it an interesting photo, I do find it a beautiful picture.

Leigh B
09-01-2012, 06:02 PM
But does that make it a good photo, or a $ value photo?
That was precisely my point. I was questioning the OP's definition of "good".

In the modern USA, good and valuable are synonymous; any question of aesthetics is moot.

Would Moonrise Hernandez be considered "good" in a less commercialized society?
That was the essence of my reply.

- Leigh

MattKing
09-01-2012, 06:14 PM
I find it both interesting and beautiful.

As I have seen so many reproductions of it, it has lost most of its ability to "surprise", but it remains effective and strong.

In this world where hype is everywhere, it seems to me to be able to stand on its own, despite having received more than its share.

Sirius Glass
09-01-2012, 06:22 PM
I don't and don't think it is, but it is by Ansel which many people like.

While I think that it is well executed, I do not care for it nor am I excited about it. It is one of Ansel Adams' that I just do not care for; while many others of his I like and appreciate more.

Leigh B
09-01-2012, 06:24 PM
I think I understand what he saw, driving down the road, as he described it. The sun on the crosses and the buildings.

But by the time he stopped, set up the camera, and took the shot, the moment was gone. His attempt to recreate that magic
from a negative that was poorly exposed (his assessment) and lacking the required contrast was not entirely successful (IMO).

We've all experienced that moment when the sun's reflection is perfect, and the subject lights up as if on fire, then it's gone.

- Leigh

markbarendt
09-01-2012, 06:28 PM
Ansel Adams, who could beat us all to death with prehistoric equipment and supplies, was extremely excited about this scene..We're all trolling critics and Ansel was an artist..if you don't get it, figure out why you aren't smart enough..EC

So, are we all supposed to like beets, okra, and Stephen Shore's work too?

Leigh B
09-01-2012, 07:37 PM
So, are we all supposed to like beets...
I like beets.

Oh... Did you mean that we should like photographs of beets???

- Leigh

markbarendt
09-01-2012, 07:43 PM
I like beets.

Oh... Did you mean that we should like photographs of beets???

- Leigh

At least it's only one outta the three. ;)

Leigh B
09-01-2012, 07:46 PM
Well, I'm ambivalent about okra, and I don't know Stephen Shore at all, so I decided to restrict my comments. :D

- Leigh

Sirius Glass
09-01-2012, 08:07 PM
Well if green peppers were included then that would include Ed Weston.

bdial
09-01-2012, 08:30 PM
IMO, no one's opinion matters but yours in the judgement of things you want to look at.
If you like it, then it's good, if not, then it isn't. I have this conversation often with my wife. That you may not like something that lots of other people do doesn't make your opinion invalid. Vive la difference!

As for that particular photo, I happen to like it, FWIW. Interestingly, earlier this year I went to a talk by John Sexton, and he showed two examples of that photograph, one was a straight print, the other was what we're all familiar with. As noted earlier, the straight print is awful. It's a good lesson in how important the final rendering of a negative into a print is.
(assuming you like the picture in the first place ;))