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scratched&grainy
04-15-2013, 12:39 PM
Hi,
does anyone know how to remove the emulsion from a b&w or colour neg/slide and to transfer it (at least bits of it) onto another neg/slide?
thanks
mark

StoneNYC
04-15-2013, 02:26 PM
Hi,
does anyone know how to remove the emulsion from a b&w or colour neg/slide and to transfer it (at least bits of it) onto another neg/slide?
thanks
mark

I have a friend Scott Chasteen who does tons of emulsion lifts from Polaroids as large as 24x30 so I can see if he knows.


~Stone

Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk

AndreasT
04-15-2013, 03:27 PM
This interests me as well, as far as I know in the olden days people also took the emulsions of photos and put them on a new surface to make a panorama. At least according to the legend.

Sirius Glass
04-15-2013, 05:10 PM
Riveria Frameworks in Rocherster New York 585 458 8840 sends out photographic prints for removing the emulsion and remounting on wood by Plak-It. I have had them do it for me many times.

OzJohn
04-16-2013, 12:02 AM
It's relatively easy to strip the top PE layer and therefore the emulsion off RC paper prints but I'd think it impossible to do something similar with film. OzJohn

mark
04-16-2013, 12:22 PM
This works for old film and might work for new. I used this technique to make copy negs of severely damaged important BW negs for a special collections department when I was in college. Imagine putting together a floating emulsion puzzle some days.

You will need distilled water, foto-flo or something similar, a tray, squeegee, what you are transferring to, a temporary base bigger than the original and something like fixed out film or over head transparency film, micro spatula, scalpel or exacto, and lots of patience.

Score or cut a couple millimeters off the edges off the film. Use a new Exacto or scalpel. Put the neg in very warm-hot distilled water and a couple drops of foto-flo

If it is going to work you will see the emulsion begin to come off as it expands in the warm water. This can take a really long time. I would keep my tray on a heating pad and do something else while I waited. Some popped right up others took a LONG time

If the edges start to come off calm down take a deep breath and get comfortable. Get the micro spatula and start working it VERY slowly between the emulsion and the base. Be patient, work very slow. It will not just come off.

Eventually you will have the base separated from the emulsion. Take out the base, and slide in the temp base. If you try to take the emulsion out it will be destroyed. Slowly position the emulsion onto the new base and gently raise it out of the tray straight up. If you tilt, the emulsion will most likely slide off.

Place the temp base and emulsion onto piece of glass place the permanent base on top of the emulsion. It has to be dry. Squeegee the two together. Most of the time you should be able to peel the temp base off with no issue. The dry permanent base will hold the emulsion. I destroyed a lot of meaningless negs figuring out how to do this and I did not need to do it on anything color, or younger than the 1960s. I did try and was able to do it on a negative from the eighties but that was one negative.

Hope this helps.

AgX
04-16-2013, 12:32 PM
Score or cut a couple millimeters off the edges off the film.

If I understand you right, by scoring the emulsion or cutting off a piece of film completely you gained a "more fresh" edge of emulsion.

But what use would that have?
Or is it just about getting rid of the perforations?

mark
04-16-2013, 02:12 PM
I was never able to successfully remove an emulsion without it tearing unless I removed a little of each edge. In my experiments the emulsion would eventually seperate in the middle of the neg but stay adhered on the edge or fray. The older the film the more likely it was to fray. The younger the film, the more likely is was to stay adhered.

The older the film the more likely it was to fray as it separated itself from the base. If you run your fingers along the edge of some older film (circa 1940s) the edges are pretty rough. This was very common with nitro negs. Scoring or cutting gave a clean smooth edge that did not fray.

Younger films needed to be cut because whatever was adhering the film to the edge to stop it from separating did not dissolve in water.

AgX
04-16-2013, 02:24 PM
The slicing and perforating may have caused the effect you describe.

gandolfi
04-16-2013, 03:19 PM
sounds like something to try!!

Like this guy? .

https://www.google.com/search?q=michal+macku&safe=off&rls=com.microsoft:da:IE-SearchBox&rlz=1I7AURU_daDK499&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=H7JtUdPKNoKPtAbHkYCYCg&ved=0CDQQsAQ&biw=1601&bih=809

mark
04-16-2013, 03:40 PM
That is my assumption on the films that were not nitrocellulose. Nitrocellulose was just nasty stuff: cracked, volatile, would shrink. One of those good ideas at the time but a conservator's nightmare.

I really should have pursued that career. I really enjoyed it.