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Bill Burk
08-16-2013, 11:48 PM
...reminds me I have much more interesting paint drying.

Oh, I thought you said you had a PRINT drying...

As I watched them hike, I wondered how they divided the load, one guy with the tripod lenses and film holders, the other with the camera body and frying pan.

Then they get to the viewpoint and ... wait... there's two of them!

*I guess they really aren't as good friends as I imagined on the outset of the video... True friends would have brought one camera and shared it.

*This is a facetious remark, friendship goes in phases where you start out having to carry two cameras, you get close enough that you can share stuff, then you get to a point where you can't stand each other anymore and have to carry two again. - Maybe they're really at that latter stage

Darkroom317
08-17-2013, 12:11 AM
Photography is art?

Please tell me you are joking. Of course it is

Ken Nadvornick
08-17-2013, 12:56 AM
Good gawd! Real photography, from back in the day when cameras were cameras, men were men, and sheep were scared...

:eek:

Ken

Davec101
08-17-2013, 01:18 AM
Kenro Izu has been moving around a 20x14 inch camera to some pretty inhospitable places around the world. I think he might use pack animals to help he though :) Someone should really do a documentary on him!

http://www.kenroizu.com/

http://www.kenroizu.com/image/Sacred_places/1998MUS9.jpg

clayne
08-17-2013, 01:51 AM
Man, I wonder how a negative that big would translate in... le gasp... megapixels.

At 4kdpi around 7300 megapixels. Hats off to shooting such a large format. True dedication.

Emile de Leon
08-17-2013, 01:00 PM
Pretty sure that is a Richard Ritter 20x24. Its pretty light for that format..
But I would think..
I would bring it to a different place than that..

ntenny
08-17-2013, 08:49 PM
I don't think carrying LF equipment is that big a deal, though obviously 20x24 is above and beyond! But the bulk is mainly in the lenses and holders; if you're only taking a couple of shots with one lens, I think almost any 8x10 field setup could be carried in a backpack, with the tripod strapped on or carried in one hand.

Remember too that the guys in the video are carrying an 11x14 as well! It seems like if it were just the monster camera, a team of two could make much lighter work of it.

-NT

Bill Burk
08-17-2013, 09:09 PM
I don't think carrying LF equipment is that big a deal, though obviously 20x24 is above and beyond! But the bulk is mainly in the lenses and holders; if you're only taking a couple of shots with one lens, I think almost any 8x10 field setup could be carried in a backpack, with the tripod strapped on or carried in one hand.

Remember too that the guys in the video are carrying an 11x14 as well! It seems like if it were just the monster camera, a team of two could make much lighter work of it.

-NT

My backpacking buddy Tom keeps reminding me... Bill, I'm carrying half that camera.

This is where I expected to see them pull out one big camera, not two. For a trip up the hill, I guess it's perfectly do-able. But for backpacking, it would take special planning and I would tip my hat to anyone with the courage to do a hike, like maybe the Pacific Crest or Appalachian trail with ULF.

For me, it's section hiking with 4x5 - because Tom doesn't really want me to have more than 15 pounds of camera gear.

Ken Nadvornick
08-18-2013, 06:38 PM
There is no perfect exposure for such shots. You choose between the overall image or you aim for perfect fireworks and everything else is underexposed to a point where the whole image is bad.

Or you double expose. First correctly for the fireworks. Then later after the show is over for the surrounding cityscape.

Ken

NB23
08-18-2013, 08:53 PM
Or you double expose. First correctly for the fireworks. Then later after the show is over for the surrounding cityscape.

Ken


Yes, yes! The good old trick of masking the lens and exposing many fireworks on a single frame! Been about 15 years since I shot fireworks.

MDR
08-19-2013, 12:09 PM
Why should they be Nutcases 20 x 24 is a fine format Kenro Izo has been mentioned and many 19th century photographers used what we now consider Mammoth Formats, we are so accustomed to small Formats that we forgot that not so far in the past 4x5 was considered a small amateur format and 35mm wasn't even a consideration for a pro.

jgjbowen
11-29-2013, 02:42 PM
Pretty sure that is a Richard Ritter 20x24. Its pretty light for that format..
But I would think..
I would bring it to a different place than that..

Yup, it's a Ritter. The film holder likely weighed almost as much as the camera.

gleaf
11-29-2013, 05:32 PM
77709Once upon a few years ago Clifford Ross and his R-1 was braving the pacific coast waves for surf edge photos. It was 20x24 if I remember right. 110 lbs.

j-dogg
12-08-2013, 07:59 AM
Longest I carried my 5x7 was 2 miles on flat pavement in the Keys and did 3 exposures.....I had my girlfriend carry some film holders to lighten the load, I also had a 5D d*****l and ultra-wide with me.

Was worth it despite dropping the lens and lensboard and having my shutter buy the farm, if I can't sort it out this week it will be in the hands of one of our trusty members.

CatLABS
12-08-2013, 09:05 AM
Good gawd! Real photography, from back in the day when cameras were cameras, men were men, and sheep were scared...

:eek:

Ken

EH Gombrich might disagree with that statement... :)