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CatLABS
08-15-2013, 10:45 AM
This was posted in LFF, but should also be seen here (because its effin amazing!):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwI5By945R0

Or

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwI5By945R0

Robert Hall
08-15-2013, 11:31 AM
Ties off with a rope... rookie. :)

jnanian
08-15-2013, 11:38 AM
:) great video !

Thomas Bertilsson
08-15-2013, 12:16 PM
Fantastic. Those are hard working photographers.

ROL
08-15-2013, 12:26 PM
OK, so let's say I admire everything about their dedication and process, but watching these two fat asses drag their gear up those switchbacks for well over 2 minutes of this video reminds me I have much more interesting paint drying.

wildbill
08-15-2013, 12:30 PM
OK, so let's say I admire everything about their dedication and process, but watching these two fat asses drag their gear up those switchbacks for well over 2 minutes of this video reminds me I have much more interesting paint drying.

hehe, yeah that first two minutes was killer

DanielStone
08-15-2013, 01:15 PM
how's that saying go:

"It's not about the destination, it's about the journey" ;)

not sure if I'd want to tote those big cameras around myself. A 5x7 Deardorff and a few lenses & holders can poop me out after 10-15 miles!

Newt_on_Swings
08-15-2013, 02:55 PM
very cool! that hike down must have sucked in the dark!

Pasto
08-15-2013, 03:23 PM
I think that's amazing! Makes my 8x10 look like a toy....my 14 year old daughter thinks they're crazy but did volunteer to help me carry a 20x24 if I buy one :)

pbromaghin
08-15-2013, 06:22 PM
Way cool. Thanks for posting.

ntenny
08-15-2013, 07:53 PM
It is pretty amazing, but I'd rather have seen more of the setup process and less of the hike. Also, all that effort and the result was one very expensively underexposed negative? Ouch!

-NT

Louis Nargi
08-15-2013, 09:35 PM
Can't see it yet till I get a better computer

CatLABS
08-16-2013, 12:35 AM
It is pretty amazing, but I'd rather have seen more of the setup process and less of the hike. Also, all that effort and the result was one very expensively underexposed negative? Ouch!

-NT

Its a night time/long exposure, how can you tell its underexposed? The end result is phenomenal, in any scale or standard.

ntenny
08-16-2013, 01:14 AM
Its a night time/long exposure, how can you tell its underexposed? The end result is phenomenal, in any scale or standard.

Oops, my French failed and I parsed "surexposee" as meaning under- rather than over-. And if you take a look at the photo as shown at about 6:10 (when the caption says "mais surexposee!!") you can see that the fireworks blew out in the center. The two 11x14 chromes look good, but as I interpret the video, it seems like Aziz the 20x24 shooter came home without a keeper.

-NT

NB23
08-16-2013, 02:06 AM
Its a night time/long exposure, how can you tell its underexposed? The end result is phenomenal, in any scale or standard.

I agree.

I would have been much more frustrated about the slight movement. The exposure was quite subjective. There is no perfect exposure for such shots. You choose between the overall image or you aim for perfect fireworks and everything else is underexposed to a point where the whole image is bad.

Nathan Riehl
08-16-2013, 02:59 AM
Man, I wonder how a negative that big would translate in... le gasp... megapixels.

Michel Hardy-Vallée
08-16-2013, 11:28 AM
The first lesson is: PACK MULE!

That descent in the dark just scared me, though.

Michael R 1974
08-16-2013, 02:02 PM
I might be alone on this, but I don't really get the point. It seems to me when people use anything bigger than 5x7 or maybe 8x10 it becomes all about trying to manage impossibly gigantic equipment and the photography itself goes pretty much out the window. It always seems like there's just too much else involved to spend any time or energy thinking about the art.

CatLABS
08-16-2013, 03:29 PM
Photography is art?

NB23
08-16-2013, 10:12 PM
I might be alone on this, but I don't really get the point. It seems to me when people use anything bigger than 5x7 or maybe 8x10 it becomes all about trying to manage impossibly gigantic equipment and the photography itself goes pretty much out the window. It always seems like there's just too much else involved to spend any time or energy thinking about the art.

Isn't all the fun about getting there, the Journey?
Besides, the big PITA isn't the format but the photo spot itself, IMO.

I know I'd have tremendous fun shooting 20x24... But I wouldn't go into mountains and remote places. Medium format would be the MAX size for such remote places...