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Vaughn
10-14-2013, 08:51 PM
A father of 4 teenage girls actually wrote "Tweak the knobs"?!

Carbon printing -- aka, Jell-O printing. It takes the time I might spend on emulsion making for film. When I print something in a hurry I platinum print!

PS -- I got boys...two of them are escorting homecoming princesses Friday!

Bill Burk
10-14-2013, 09:09 PM
PS -- I got boys...two of them are escorting homecoming princesses Friday!

They couldn't find triplet princesses?

jnanian
10-14-2013, 09:17 PM
hey denise

id love to see more posts here about emulsion making and the use of liquid emulsions.
they are a lot of fun. as a university student i fiddled around with making emulsions
mind didn't come out very good, but i did manage to make one, but then was turned onto liquid light
which became my go-to for years.

ive been kind of stagnant since the spring .. and was coating glass and metal plates
as well as paper and doing some fun-stuff, but the summer rolled around and other obligations set in
so i put everything on the back burner .. maybe this fall+winter i will get back on the wagon i fell off of :)

not sure how much less expensive making emulsion from scratch is or might be, or even using it from a bottle,
but it is definitely a lot of fun seeing an image appear on something that was hand coated because a lot of the time
things change between uses as the emulsion ages or whatever
its really like the movie run lola run sometimes ...

Vaughn
10-14-2013, 09:19 PM
They couldn't find triplet princesses?
:p

Ian Grant
10-15-2013, 03:50 AM
I'm not quite sure if I'm addressing your statement about "parameters", but I'll offer that I've learned (the hard way) that time/temp/reagent conc. during "finishing" (sulfur/gold) can be critical when trying to squeeze another stop or two from an emulsion. Some of the procedures are probably easier done a large scale as opposed to a basement lab scale.

That's exactly what I meant. :) Somewhere in my old notes I drew up a diagram on how different parameters could affect an emulsion, I'm fairly sure it came from studying "The Photographic Emulsion" by Carroll, Hubbard, and Kretschman, The Focal Press. (A PDF version of the book can be found at TheLightFarm).

Ian

dwross
10-15-2013, 11:49 AM
A father of 4 teenage girls actually wrote "Tweak the knobs"?!

Carbon printing -- aka, Jell-O printing. It takes the time I might spend on emulsion making for film. When I print something in a hurry I platinum print!

PS -- I got boys...two of them are escorting homecoming princesses Friday!


Just as handsome as their daddy :). I could see that one coming when they were just twelve!

Congrats on the new house and soon-to-be darkroom! Hopefully, it won't be too long before we can try dry plate and carbon combos.

dwross
10-15-2013, 11:58 AM
...

the summer rolled around and other obligations set in
so i put everything on the back burner .. maybe this fall+winter i will get back on the wagon i fell off of :)

...

"off the wagon" happens (at least to me and everyone else I know). I figure it's just the Universe giving you space to refill the creative well. Best of luck.

Speaking of which, I'm procrastinating on making a set of autochrome screen tests. You probably know the feeling. Everything is lined up and ready to go. That was the easy part. The "plunge" into the unknown, on the other hand...

David Foy
10-27-2013, 03:08 PM
One of the interesting things about the emulsion discussions on APUG, interesting to me anyway, is how they illuminate two distinct, and distinctly different, approaches.
One is what I think of as the engineering approach. Calling the other the artistic approach is too glib, and a little dismissive, but useful enough that I'll go ahead and do it, hoping readers understand that I mean no disrespect.
People who are deeply committed to one approach or the other sometimes find themselves offended when their assumptions are challenged. To tell an engineer that all his/her hoo-rah and foo-fraw is unnecessary, or to tell artists that they're not being careful enough, is about something other than emulsion-making, it's about how to live and get things done, and it's a rubbing that can create sparks.
There are accomplished people here working from both viewpoints, whom I learn a lot from, and I appreciate it when they share with me. I expect to be making my first emulsion in a few weeks. I don't happen to believe that my artistic vision is so good that I should publish or display my photographs, and I will never be an engineer, but I will be making use of both kinds of experience. I will share what I learn.
Everybody who posts here has my thanks.

wildbillbugman
11-02-2013, 05:24 PM
Vaughn,
I know, only because you said so, that your triplets are not identical. You coulda fooled me. I knew a man who's two identical sons married two identical twins. At the same ceremony. That's wilder than emulsion making could ever be.

MattKing
11-03-2013, 12:19 PM
Vaughn,
I know, only because you said so, that your triplets are not identical. You coulda fooled me. I knew a man who's two identical sons married two identical twins. At the same ceremony. That's wilder than emulsion making could ever be.

I'm glad I wasn't the wedding photographer - just think how difficult it would be organizing print orders!

totalamateur
12-13-2013, 04:16 PM
I got into emulsion making because I wanted to do carbon prints. I needed big negatives. Then I discovered X-ray film and Duplication film thus negating the "need" for home - brew emulsions.

I have not given up on the home brew; but working 60+ hours and a baby on the way means all photography pursuits, whether store bought film and paper, digital, carbon prints, cyanotypes, or dry plates (and hopefully some day a 20X24 camera and daguerrotypes) must be carefully prioritized. Unfortunately, this means I stick with Tri X and oriental seagull. I find that for a high ratio of quality over time invested, my TLR beats my digital SLR every time. I cannot say the same for my carbon and emulsion efforts.

I forget which treatise said it, but someone stated that carbon printing is a process for the "unemployed or idle rich" I think the same may be said for emulsion making, although given the expense of AGNO3, gold and dye, It might just be for the latter.

I dearly hope to be idly rich soon; build a new darkroom (baby will be taking over the old one) and once again fire up the mixing hotplate.

Realistically, I will have no contributions in the forseeable future.