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baachitraka
10-29-2013, 11:46 AM
You do not see anything on the paper after it is exposed to the light. So, next step is to develop with paper developers. Please, do not ask which one is the best. :-)

After development, you may pass it into a stop bath and finally into the fixer(must).

Cheryl Jacobs
10-29-2013, 07:21 PM
The light is just fine for a portrait, but the tones are very flat.

Raffay
10-29-2013, 09:04 PM
The light is just fine for a portrait, but the tones are very flat.

What can I do to improve tones? Is it the developer or something else.

Raffay
10-29-2013, 09:05 PM
You do not see anything on the paper after it is exposed to the light. So, next step is to develop with paper developers. Please, do not ask which one is the best. :-)

After development, you may pass it into a stop bath and finally into the fixer(must).

I will not ask which is the best developer, but would like to know if there is something that I can develop mixing readily available chemicals.

L Gebhardt
10-30-2013, 08:23 AM
There are plenty of recipes for paper developers that you can mix yourself. I like Ansco 130 the best. It keeps very well, so you don't need to constantly mix up new, and it has some of the nicest tones on the warm tone paper I like. The recipe is posted in many places, but here's one such link: http://www.apug.org/forums/viewpost.php?p=1371914

I don't know how readily available the chemicals will be in Pakistan, but I imagine you could mail order them.

I personally don't think 4x5 is big enough for contact printing, so before you get setup for this make sure you will be happy with the 4x5 inch prints. If I had limited space I would go with either a medium format system like a Hasselblad and a smaller medium format enlarger, or an 8x10 camera and make contact prints. It really depends how you want to work. I know it's heretical to say on this board, but you can also produce excellent work scanning and printing digitally. I still like darkroom prints better, but at some point the reality of space and chemical availability must be factored in.

jeffreyg
10-30-2013, 09:36 AM
You mention that a cousin could bring you supplies from Canada. If so you might try some of Ilford's direct positive paper as well. It is available in 4x5 size. It is very slow so portraits could be tricky and some testing to find the right exposure for your equipment may be necessary. You would develop and fix as with regular photographic paper.

I see nothing wrong with 4x5 prints and make 4x5 platinum/palladium contact prints. In my opinion print size should be determined by how far from the print the viewers would be. Consider that books generally have small prints. If as suggested scanning is an option but you still want to print with "traditional" photographic paper you can scan and enlarge a negative on to transparent media such as the Pictorico transparent film and contact print from that.

http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

pbromaghin
10-30-2013, 01:06 PM
I know it's heretical to say on this board, but you can also produce excellent work scanning and printing digitally. I still like darkroom prints better, but at some point the reality of space and chemical availability must be factored in.

Agreed on all points. You will lose some detail from the highest highlights and deepest shadows, but it is a pretty easy way to start printing, and lots of people on here do it. We just go over to dpug.org to talk about it.