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MattKing
01-09-2014, 12:21 AM
What the heck - may as well add a tree/forest photo of my own.

Hope it survives the manipulations necessary to squeeze in on to the page - it looks a lot better as a print or, best yet, a projected transparency.

Vaughn
01-09-2014, 12:51 AM
It survived nicely, Matt! Good feeling of depth.

VaryaV
01-09-2014, 08:02 AM
Vaughn and Matt - those pics are breathtaking! WOW! WOW! OMG! I know the 'groups' have all but died but a 'tree gallery' would be spectacular. I spend all day looking at Moersch and Morali trees on iPernity. Maybe we could just do something like that here. How beautiful and majestic they are! Take a deep breath and I can just smell the wet cedar and dampness from the lichen.

Oh we must have a tree gallery! :)

Thomas Bertilsson
01-09-2014, 08:44 AM
For me it's all about capturing the spirit of a place. If there are trees in it, I still focus on the place they are in, because that's important in how the tree developed into what it is.
The woods and trees are magical to me, so I try to capture that wonder, always interested in the light that surround them. Like Vaughn, I think the light makes the photograph come alive.

VaryaV
01-09-2014, 01:10 PM
Those are lovely Thomas. That 3rd one looks exactly like my dad's driveway. (sniff, sniff) Which I am really regretting not taking over now! I'd be a stone's throw from Photostock!!!!

Keep 'em coming folks! These are awesome.

Vaughn
01-09-2014, 01:30 PM
Most excellent images, Thomas.

irvd2x
01-09-2014, 01:32 PM
Thomas,wonderful images!Well done.I would love a book filled with images of this quality and atmosphere!

Sent from my LG-P509 using Tapatalk 2

cliveh
01-09-2014, 01:43 PM
Oh we must have a tree gallery! :)

I'm in favour of this and I know the argument against would be why not have a portrait gallery, or a landscape gallery, but perhaps galleries covering some on specific genres would be a good idea. If APUG ever produces a book or ventures into online exhibitions, such galleries could prove useful.

Thomas Bertilsson
01-09-2014, 02:21 PM
Emerald Ash Borer is killing all the ash trees in the central US.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emerald_ash_borer

Although the cold snap of late may drastically reduce the impact. We need deep freezes like that to reduce the effect of vermin.

Thomas Bertilsson
01-09-2014, 02:27 PM
That and long-scale photographic processes!

What is amazing is to see a ring of huge redwoods that started out as sprouts around the 'parent' tree. The parent tree has completely disappeared...and it takes a long time for a standing redwood to rot away. So the sprouts are somewhere around 1000 years old (give or take 500), and the parent tree might have lived that long, or longer. The sprouts are genetically the same tree as the parent tree, so it could be argued that they are 2000+ years old.

This photo is from 1986 and the redwood had fallen within about ten years of this photo. Now the trunk is an elevated forest -- no space to walk (or lay) on it anymore (The wood imp might still be there, but I never saw her again...;) )

PS -- thanks, Bill. I have been photographing along this section of creek for over 30 years...never tire of it...always something new.

I love this photograph and cheer every time I see it.

Thomas Bertilsson
01-09-2014, 02:29 PM
What the heck - may as well add a tree/forest photo of my own.

Hope it survives the manipulations necessary to squeeze in on to the page - it looks a lot better as a print or, best yet, a projected transparency.

That's wonderful, Matt. Luminous.

Vaughn
01-09-2014, 02:37 PM
Thanks, Thomas. One of these days I'll re-copy the print and re-post a decent image of it. The reproduction ended up with much too much contrast -- in the original the only area without shadow detail is right under the root wad, and the highlight values are much more controlled.

DREW WILEY
01-09-2014, 02:52 PM
Nothing the web is capable of conveying can do justice to your actual carbon prints, Vaughn. It's like trying to listen to a symphony with one's
head buried in the sand.

VaryaV
01-09-2014, 02:53 PM
Thanks, Thomas. One of these days I'll re-copy the print and re-post a decent image of it. The reproduction ended up with much too much contrast -- in the original the only area without shadow detail is right under the root wad, and the highlight values are much more controlled.

What? I totally disagree with you Vaughn. The way you presented the image show just how bloody 'hot and arid' the desert is. Especially Death Valley. I think it's perfect as is. I think if you had more shadow detail it would lose that sense of aridity. I could be wrong but the feeling it conveys is perfect to me. Love that tone.


I think breaking down the galleries would be a great idea. I wonder where I would post my stuff... the sandbox gallery? :D:D

StoneNYC
01-09-2014, 02:57 PM
For me it's all about capturing the spirit of a place. If there are trees in it, I still focus on the place they are in, because that's important in how the tree developed into what it is.
The woods and trees are magical to me, so I try to capture that wonder, always interested in the light that surround them. Like Vaughn, I think the light makes the photograph come alive.

We had a discussion long ago about TMY-2 and Rodinal, and I took your advice with agitation (part of it) and have now incorporated it into my normal technique, for that I thank you. That tree image has also grown on me significantly, the second one, it took me a long time to appreciate it for some reason, and now it understand, it's awesome.

That's all I got.

StoneNYC
01-09-2014, 02:58 PM
What the heck - may as well add a tree/forest photo of my own.

Hope it survives the manipulations necessary to squeeze in on to the page - it looks a lot better as a print or, best yet, a projected transparency.

Nice job!

Vaughn
01-09-2014, 03:19 PM
What? I totally disagree with you Vaughn. The way you presented the image show just how bloody 'hot and arid' the desert is. Especially Death Valley. I think it's perfect as is. I think if you had more shadow detail it would lose that sense of aridity. I could be wrong but the feeling it conveys is perfect to me. Love that tone....

Actually, I think Thomas was talking about image of the nude on the fallen redwood ( a 7x19 silver gelatin print from a 4x5 neg). The desert palm image is pretty close to the original -- just lost a little highlight detail in the foreground in the reproduction -- thanks for the comment on the desert image, though!

VaryaV
01-09-2014, 03:24 PM
Speaking of GREAT news! My Curry Leaf trees survived the cold blast. I can't believe it. Everything else bit the dust. I wrapped those babies up in blankets and as many sheets as I could find over bamboo poles. They're native to India and don't like temps under 55(F). About 5' tall now and tap root would kill the tree if I dug them out. I am so happy. They are part of my food forest I use for cooking. I snapped a few pics of them in D100/Pyro-HD. I'll print them over the weekend and show them. I have been protecting them, the leaves are so heavily-scented you get a wonderful aroma every time you brush by them... of course they are planted right along the path to the d/r. Unfortunately almost everything else died. It got down to 12 & 18 (F) for 3 consecutive days with no snow cover to protect them.

VaryaV
01-09-2014, 03:25 PM
Actually, I think Thomas was talking about image of the nude on the fallen redwood. The desert palm image is pretty close to the original -- just lost a little highlight detail in the foreground in the reproduction -- thanks for the comment on the desert image, though!

Well, it wouldn't be the first time I made a dork of myself. ;)

MattKing
01-09-2014, 04:09 PM
Thanks all.

I have lots of shots of trees - my wife sometimes accuses me of being unable to shoot anything that doesn't have a rock or a tree in it.

But I must say that this thread makes me think of Tolkein and the elves.