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VaryaV
01-09-2014, 05:14 PM
But I must say that this thread makes me think of Tolkein and the elves.

You know, I was thinking that very thought myself!! Tom Bombadil and his maiden lady Goldberry.

Vaughn
01-09-2014, 05:35 PM
Well, it wouldn't be the first time I made a dork of myself. ;)

No worries...It was not obvious.

Sometimes one finds an image with-in an image. After taking the one of my boys (159mm lens on 8x10), I noticed the redwood off in the light in the far back left. I used a 19" lens for it (4x10). I was set-up about 15 to 20 feet above the ground on some fallen redwoods. Both are platinum prints.

VaryaV
01-10-2014, 06:14 AM
Magical. Words can not describe the beauty but my eyes of joy do...

Vaughn
01-10-2014, 03:00 PM
You know, I was thinking that very thought myself!! Tom Bombadil and his maiden lady Goldberry.

And Ents! Many things 'wrong' with the LotR movies. 1) No Tom Bombadil and his maiden lady Goldberry and 2) the Ents got trashed and turned into comic characters that had be tricked by hobbits to act!

And I have to toss in another image -- Three Boys, Three Snags, Prairie Creek Pedwoods State Park, 8x10 carbon print

StoneNYC
01-10-2014, 03:23 PM
And Ents! Many things 'wrong' with the LotR movies. 1) No Tom Bombadil and his maiden lady Goldberry and 2) the Ents got trashed and turned into comic characters that had be tricked by hobbits to act!

And I have to toss in another image -- Three Boys, Three Snags, Prairie Creek Pedwoods State Park, 8x10 carbon print

Wow, incredible! And I can only find 2 boys... Where's Waldo?

kintatsu
01-10-2014, 03:40 PM
For me, it has to do with the feeling of the scene or area. Trees are part of the scenes I shoot most, so how they feel in the scene determines a lot.

Vaughn
01-10-2014, 03:44 PM
Wow, incredible! And I can only find 2 boys... Where's Waldo?

Hunkered down between the two boys in white. It was a two-minute exposure...the boys are good at holding still!

On a Mac, one can click on the image, click on it again (brings it to a new window, and to its best quality level), then enlarge it many times (Command-+) and find Bryce easily. Don't know how to enlarge the screen on a PC.

StoneNYC
01-10-2014, 04:08 PM
Hunkered down between the two boys in white. It was a two-minute exposure...the boys are good at holding still!

On a Mac, one can click on the image, click on it again (brings it to a new window, and to its best quality level), then enlarge it many times (Command-+) and find Bryce easily. Don't know how to enlarge the screen on a PC.

Ahhh haha, I'm on a iPhone.... Hahaha

But I have a Mac at home :)

VaryaV
01-10-2014, 04:49 PM
And Ents! Many things 'wrong' with the LotR movies. 1) No Tom Bombadil and his maiden lady Goldberry and 2) the Ents got trashed and turned into comic characters that had be tricked by hobbits to act!

And I have to toss in another image -- Three Boys, Three Snags, Prairie Creek Pedwoods State Park, 8x10 carbon print

Yes, I was VERY upset there was NO Bombadil. He was the MOST important character in the whole series for me... the ring had NO power over him. How they could have left that out was shocking. The Ents are the wise-old caretakers of the forests. To make a mockery of them was blasphemy! grrrr! Anyway I grew up with the books and read them cover to cover and how many sets were just destroyed... should have gone with the hardcovers. So I was really picky about the film....


I love that pic, Vaughn, really puts humans in perspective to those humble giants...("puny, defenseless bipeds," as Tom Baker said.) I can see the 3rd one Stone but on an iPhone it's probably too small for you, he is swallowed up by the shear size of the 'Ent' snag being in dark clothes but you can make the head out.

All these trees and forests are wonderful!

Toffle
01-10-2014, 05:23 PM
I don't know how I've missed this thread. There are some stunning images here. I am humbled by the awesome talent these photographs represent.

Seeing as we seem to be speaking of Hobbits here, as Samwise would say, there's tress and then there's trees. In isolation a tree becomes a monument, a testament, an Ent. In a tight-knit forest a challenge is to find the light that allows the subject to distinguish itself from its neighbours. The old expression can get turned on its head - you can't see the tree for the forest. As I said, I am humbled; I don't think there is a single tree in my gallery that could stand next to the amazing work here.

Cheers,
Tom

Bill Burk
01-11-2014, 11:03 AM
I'm a bit behind developing so my shots from last weekend are still latent images... hopefully I'll get them developed and printed before the MSA is finished 'cause I used a cheap camera for some...

Toffle, your DeLaurier Trail Marsh 3 fits in well, your poetic approach shows. Trees are not an exclusive club. So many of us love them for deep reasons.

Some of my fascination with trees comes from my childhood. I used to climb trees and make treehouses, chase snakes out to the thinnest branches, fall down into beds of soft nettle. I'd walk barefoot under Live Oaks, climb up to check out galls and ants.

Ralph,

You don't have to change your approach, I am a hunter, I rarely "make" photographs. But I understand the difference and we need both kinds. Instead of making Bonsai, you can go out and get the trees and bring them indoors...

80042

NedL
01-11-2014, 11:16 AM
I've enjoyed reading this thread very much!

Steve Smith
01-11-2014, 11:22 AM
Here is one of mine which won first prize in a competition. The prize... to climb a tree!

80043

http://www.goodleaf.co.uk/


Steve.

StoneNYC
01-11-2014, 11:30 AM
I'm a bit behind developing so my shots from last weekend are still latent images... hopefully I'll get them developed and printed before the MSA is finished 'cause I used a cheap camera for some...

Toffle, your DeLaurier Trail Marsh 3 fits in well, your poetic approach shows. Trees are not an exclusive club. So many of us love them for deep reasons.

Some of my fascination with trees comes from my childhood. I used to climb trees and make treehouses, chase snakes out to the thinnest branches, fall down into beds of soft nettle. I'd walk barefoot under Live Oaks, climb up to check out galls and ants.

Ralph,

You don't have to change your approach, I am a hunter, I rarely "make" photographs. But I understand the difference and we need both kinds. Instead of making Bonsai, you can go out and get the trees and bring them indoors...

80042

That lens bokeh is beautiful.

Bill Burk
01-11-2014, 11:42 AM
It's the lens from my dad's Spotmatic II (but on a Spotmatic F) - the golden colored SMCT 50mm f/1.4 - wide open - I needed the highest shutter speed I could get, I think 1/30 and a deep breath.

Toffle
01-11-2014, 02:56 PM
Toffle, your DeLaurier Trail Marsh 3 fits in well, your poetic approach shows. Trees are not an exclusive club. So many of us love them for deep reasons.

Thanks, Bill. I remember the (dismal) day I shot that scene, and remember sweating my man parts off in the darkroom trying to bring some light to the details of an otherwise dark print.

Cheers,
Tom

Vaughn
01-11-2014, 04:50 PM
Here is one of mine which won first prize in a competition. The prize... to climb a tree!

Steve.

Congrats! FINEST KIND!

Bill Burk
01-12-2014, 12:53 AM
Here is one of mine which won first prize in a competition. The prize... to climb a tree!

80043

http://www.goodleaf.co.uk/


Steve.

Wow, safe tree climbing. It's necessary... I won't let my kids do what I did. But that is the way to go! All fun, no dread for fear of life and limb.

Steve Smith
01-12-2014, 04:23 AM
The competition was judged based on a 1000 pixel image posted on their website so they were quite surprised when I presented them with a mounted 12" x 16" print.


I made very slow progress climbing up the rope. Meanwhile, a ten year old girl on the other side of the tree went to the top and back down again three times whilst I struggled!


Steve.

Vaughn
01-12-2014, 11:21 AM
Wow, safe tree climbing. It's necessary... I won't let my kids do what I did. But that is the way to go! All fun, no dread for fear of life and limb.

I started taking my three boys hiking in the redwoods when they were 4 yrs old or so. Between climbing trees in the woods and rocks at the beach, they got quite a bit of experience, both in climbing and in falling (okay, their mom was never with us...LOL!). All the broken bones and injuries requiring stitches happened at home or at the playgrounds of the school and parks...not out in the 'wilds'!