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View Full Version : What film for Polaroid Land Camera Automatic 100 ?



david b
11-08-2005, 12:59 AM
I just realized I had this old camera in my office and was wondering if film for it is still around?

If so, what film and where can I buy it?

thanks,
david

Dave Parker
11-08-2005, 01:06 AM
If I remember right David, the film for those models have been discontinued a ways back, many of the older land film cameras no longer have film being made..The model 100 used type 41 pack film...

You might look at this page:

http://www.krphoto.com/polaroid.html

Dave

david b
11-08-2005, 01:08 AM
thanks Dave.

Now I can put it away and forget about it again.

Paul Sorensen
11-08-2005, 01:15 AM
David, don't pitch it! It uses the standard pack film that is still available. (Ex: 669, 664, 667, etc)

Here is info from the Land List: http://www.rwhirled.com/landlist/landdcam-pack.htm#100

RichSBV
11-08-2005, 01:34 AM
I was just going to dispute this (politely), until I read the film page at that site. I have a 100 laying around here somewhere bought new when they first came out. I knew it used the 100 series pack film. I just took it for granted that the 100 series and 600 series packs were different. It would seem from that site that they are interchangable? And That's a suprise to me! I might have to dig out the old camera and see if it still works now...

Dave Parker
11-08-2005, 01:35 AM
David, don't pitch it! It uses the standard pack film that is still available. (Ex: 669, 664, 667, etc)

Here is info from the Land List: http://www.rwhirled.com/landlist/landdcam-pack.htm#100

Paul,

Thats what I love about Polaroids, the information is always so confusing as to if you can still or can't find film for them!!!

David, it that is the case, then you can use the really nice Fuji FP100 C color film, which is a very nice film with good color...

I stand corrected.

LOL

Dave

david b
11-08-2005, 01:49 AM
Okay boys...shoot 'em if you got 'em!!!!

eric
11-08-2005, 01:52 AM
David, don't pitch it! It uses the standard pack film that is still available. (Ex: 669, 664, 667, etc)

Here is info from the Land List: http://www.rwhirled.com/landlist/landdcam-pack.htm#100
I think you may need a px19 battery for it as well. It looks like an AA battery with 9v type ends to it. You can get it from Adorama for < $10 bucks. The battery is used to power the shutter.

Donald Qualls
11-08-2005, 12:55 PM
The Model 100 uses either a 531 or 532 battery, both still available from Polaroid (if the contacts aren't corroded beyond help); make sure you have the correct type, though; the 531 is 4.5 V, while the 532 is 3 V, but they're identical size and connectors and too much voltage could damage the shutter while too little won't run it. IMO, it's simpler to clip out the (probalby green) connectors and wire in a 2xAAA or 3xAAA battery holder; the camera will work fine on these batteries, and they'll be obtainable for the next 30-40 years at least. The 2xAAA will even fit inside the original battery compartment without modifying any of the hardware (I've done it on my Model 350).

The Model 100, with Scene Selector as well as four ASA speed settings, can be used with every 660 series film Polaroid sells -- I recommend Type 667, 690, and 665 (the last will require setting the camera to ASA 75 and then turning the lighten-darken dial about one to 1 1/2 large divisions toward lighten to give good negatives, or about one one small division for the print). The auto exposure in these cameras works correctly (with all films) with bulb flash, but you'll have to use guide numbers and either filters or trickery to get correct exposure with electronic flash (though with Type 667 film, you hardly need flash). The synch socket on the side of the shutter is X synch, and the L shaped slot above operates a switch that sets the exposure circuit for flash operation.

Paul Sorensen
11-08-2005, 12:59 PM
The Model 100 uses either a 531 or 532 battery, both still available from Polaroid (if the contacts aren't corroded beyond help); make sure you have the correct type, though; the 531 is 4.5 V, while the 532 is 3 V, but they're identical size and connectors and too much voltage could damage the shutter while too little won't run it. IMO, it's simpler to clip out the (probalby green) connectors and wire in a 2xAAA or 3xAAA battery holder; the camera will work fine on these batteries, and they'll be obtainable for the next 30-40 years at least. The 2xAAA will even fit inside the original battery compartment without modifying any of the hardware (I've done it on my Model 350).

The Model 100, with Scene Selector as well as four ASA speed settings, can be used with every 660 series film Polaroid sells -- I recommend Type 667, 690, and 665 (the last will require setting the camera to ASA 75 and then turning the lighten-darken dial about one to 1 1/2 large divisions toward lighten to give good negatives, or about one one small division for the print). The auto exposure in these cameras works correctly (with all films) with bulb flash, but you'll have to use guide numbers and either filters or trickery to get correct exposure with electronic flash (though with Type 667 film, you hardly need flash). The synch socket on the side of the shutter is X synch, and the L shaped slot above operates a switch that sets the exposure circuit for flash operation.
Seems that you could also use an auto flash like a Vivitar 283 and just set it to the correct setting for your film speed and aperture. That is if there is any reliable data regarding the actual aperture on these cameras.

eric
11-08-2005, 01:27 PM
The Model 100 uses either a 531 or 532 battery, both still available from Polaroid (if the contacts aren't corroded beyond help); make sure you have the correct type, though; the 531 is 4.5 V, while the 532 is 3 V, but they're identical size and connectors and too much voltage could
Donald,
Great information. On my similar 250, it uses a 4.5v 531 battery and Adorama has one for it. I did hear that Polaroid sells them too.



the (probalby green) connectors and wire in a 2xAAA or 3xAAA battery holder; the camera will work fine on these batteries, and they'll be obtainable

I've seen jpegs on the web that has these and I'm electronically illerate so I didn't try it.


690, and 665 (the last will require setting the camera to ASA 75 and then turning the lighten-darken dial about one to 1 1/2 large divisions toward

Thanks for this tip. I'll be experimenting with 665 pretty soon and I'll try this


need flash). The synch socket on the side of the shutter is X synch, and the L shaped slot above operates a switch that sets the exposure circuit for flash operation.
Not sure how the 100 looks like but I've wanted to see if I can figure out how to set up an external flash with mine.

PhotoPete
11-08-2005, 02:08 PM
I have illustrated instructions on converting packfilm cameras to use standard N size batteries. It requires no soldering (it's optional), and the N cells are small enough that you can mount them and their holders inside the existing battery changer. I can send these out if anyone is interested.

I would also make a plug for the Fuji color film. It develops slower, but the colors are richer than the Polaroid, IMHO.

Donald Qualls
11-08-2005, 04:44 PM
Seems that you could also use an auto flash like a Vivitar 283 and just set it to the correct setting for your film speed and aperture. That is if there is any reliable data regarding the actual aperture on these cameras.

Most likely you could -- with the camera set for "indoor without flash" on ASA 3000, or "Bright or Dull Day, also Flash" with ASA 75, you can count on f/8.8, which is too small for my little automatic flash, but might work with a more powerful unit like the Vivitar. The Land List shows the smallest aperture for the Model 100 at f/42, but doesn't seem to have information on any intermediate apertures; if you ever have the lens off, it should be possible to measure the actual apertures and do the arithmetic (114 mm focal length). Some later models changed the smallest aperture from f/42 to f/48 or so (I think this was the 300 series). Or you could compare guide numbers of your flash against an M2B in a 3-inch polished bowl (with the filter on the flash unit, it acts like a blue bulb even with a clear bulb in the socket) to extrapolate a workable distance for the above apertures, as I'll do with my small strobe if I ever use it (I have enough M2B bulbs to last me a couple years or more at the rate I use them).