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avandesande
02-24-2006, 06:08 AM
They are doing this to protect your credit card! (or at least to make sure it is really yours)
By far the most secure normal way to do something like this is to fax it.


I have been to that website and indeed I can orde from there.
Mailing it will cost 30 dollar extra.... (relativally cheap though compared to other sites). BUT

They asked me to send a copy of my creditcard!!!!! by mail or email. I have read a lot about this site on the internet and it seems to be safe, but I won't send copy of my creditcard nowhere!

Best regards Sam

Nick Zentena
02-24-2006, 07:44 AM
hmm kodak.com indicates it's only available in us canada and japan....

guess I'll have to order from overseas....
anyone knows one that is good ad quick and carries uc1oo?
Best regards Sam

Doesn't Kodak call it something else in Europe? Wouldn't be the first time.

game
02-24-2006, 05:09 PM
Doesn't Kodak call it something else in Europe? Wouldn't be the first time.

yeah, I posted earlier in this topics about that.
It seems that kokdak has a similar film called 'kodak elite color' it's a pro negative film, but only exists in 200/400 iso. Kinda weird.
It is located on the same place on the european website as ultra color on the American, but I am not sure it's the same.
From what I have heard about uc100, that's more a portra film with more saturation, but still nice skin tones. I get the feeling 'our' eilte film is more of a kodak gold kinda consmuer film, alltough it is marketed as a pro film....

Sam

roteague
02-24-2006, 05:17 PM
I bought a roll of Kodak Elite Chrome in New Zealand, I was looking for a Fuji film, but took what I could get. It actually isn't a bad film, the images look good, but I haven't had the chance to scan them yet.

game
02-24-2006, 07:45 PM
I bought a roll of Kodak Elite Chrome in New Zealand, I was looking for a Fuji film, but took what I could get. It actually isn't a bad film, the images look good, but I haven't had the chance to scan them yet.

eilte chrome is something completally different though. The one I ment is print film...

game
02-25-2006, 08:48 AM
i've shot some realla today, will be having prints next week...

game
02-28-2006, 02:43 PM
I picked up my negatieves and contactsheet. REALA is a beautifull film i mus say. It has that same decentness of the portra, but with a littlle more snap to it.
I can't be to concusive on this, because I shot only one roll under different circumcences and my expusure time is not OK yet, but I do feel reala is a film to watch.

Game

Patzer
08-27-2008, 02:30 PM
I do not know if it is "professional", but probably the most popular color one is Velvia 50.

StorminMatt
11-25-2008, 05:38 AM
I do not know if it is "professional", but probably the most popular color one is Velvia 50.

Velvia, along with Provia and Astia, are professional films. Sensia is the only amateur slide film made by Fuji. Generally speaking, I have found that there seems to be little to no difference between amateur and professional slide films. For instance, I challenge you to see what is better about a shot taken with regular Kodachrome and Professional Kodachrome. On the other hand, there seems to be more to be gained by using professional negative film vs amateur negative film. Maybe this is because manufacturers look at anyone who shoots slide film of any kind as being higher up the 'photography food chain' than someone who just shoots amateur C41 film.

In any case, if you are looking for a good C41 film for landscapes, how about the new Ektar 100? I actually never wanted to touch C41 until I shot a roll of Ektar 25 that I got bundled with several rolls of Kodachrome 25 on ebay. And I have to say that it is the BEST C41 film I have EVER shot. It certainly comes closer than ANY other C41 film when it comes to getting the goodness of a transparency film in a C41. Of course, I don't know if the new Ektar 100 is as good (Ive not tried it yet). But if it is half as good as the old stuff, it would be worth looking into over portrait-style C41 films. I don't think it is available as 120 or sheet film, though.

Curt
11-25-2008, 07:08 AM
This is an old thread but where can a person get transparencies developed these days?

Paul Jenkin
11-25-2008, 02:21 PM
If you haven't seen this website before, it's worth checking out:

http://choose-film.com/

Have a look at the 'shop' heading as it's a link to Fujilab professional shop.

Paul.

StorminMatt
11-25-2008, 04:13 PM
This is an old thread but where can a person get transparencies developed these days?

I guess that all depend on where you live. There is actually an E6 lab right here where I live. I can drop off my film through their door slot after a day of shooting, and have it done the following afternoon. The cost is about $8.00 for 36 exposures - more than C41 done at a typical Walgreens. But less than having C41 processed and printed at an actual professional lab. Of course, Kodachrome has to be sent to Kansas for processing.

alex gard
12-16-2013, 06:28 PM
I'm just an amateur and relatively new to film but have used a few different types of film and here is what I've found: Ektar is a really good film to use on overcast days, it has awesome green tones especially in foliage under canopy. It can be quite 'moody' in this kind of environment. Portra is really a really great all rounder (I've only used 160 and haven't ran any 400 yet) and I love the reds. It shines on sunny days but even in lower light it still works great. Reala is ok but probably not my cup of tea. It has a very strong "70s" colour tone to it (well the roll I shot, anyway) but I was not a fan of the latitude. It renders a scene in a kind of retro way which might suit some people. I have not processed any of my velvia or provia yet but should be in the next couple of weeks. It seems that most people in the know prefer to shoot velvia 50 if they can afford it (I paid $130 AUD for a box of 20 in 4x5 and around $65 for a box of 120) In saing all this I am leaning more towards black and white these days and am actually going to look forward to blowing through all this colour film I have and just sticking to tmax, acros and ektar/portra/velvia. I like acros especially for the reciprocity characteristics and tmax has wonderful contrast

jerrybro
12-17-2013, 10:08 PM
I'm just an amateur and relatively new to film but have used a few different types of film and here is what I've found: Ektar is a really good film to use on overcast days, it has awesome green tones especially in foliage under canopy. It can be quite 'moody' in this kind of environment. Portra is really a really great all rounder (I've only used 160 and haven't ran any 400 yet) and I love the reds. It shines on sunny days but even in lower light it still works great. Reala is ok but probably not my cup of tea. It has a very strong "70s" colour tone to it (well the roll I shot, anyway) but I was not a fan of the latitude. It renders a scene in a kind of retro way which might suit some people. I have not processed any of my velvia or provia yet but should be in the next couple of weeks. It seems that most people in the know prefer to shoot velvia 50 if they can afford it (I paid $130 AUD for a box of 20 in 4x5 and around $65 for a box of 120) In saing all this I am leaning more towards black and white these days and am actually going to look forward to blowing through all this colour film I have and just sticking to tmax, acros and ektar/portra/velvia. I like acros especially for the reciprocity characteristics and tmax has wonderful contrast

I suggest that you do not evaluate film based on prints someone else made. Today, with a limited amount of color paper choices, matching the negative to the paper is critical. And with the limited paper choices available to the home printer, it unfortunately leads us to scanning the negs to compare.

On another forum I mentioned that bad C41 processing from the 70s led me into slide film and Kodak/Kodalux processing. (I was told I was wrong and that all procesing was fine until about 5 years ago, I left that forum) As I went through the the 80s and early 90s I was happy with the mail order process I'd worked out. In the mid 90s I started doing my own developing. Then the big D started to change everything. Procesing options started to disappear very quickly, the higher quality, mass market ones went first. Today you are left with 3 choices, mass market that you wouldn't trust to lick a stamp; hi end hi price hi quality houses; do it yourself. DiY comes in 2 flavors, analog printing and digital printing/sharing.

polyglot
12-17-2013, 11:42 PM
Guys, this thread is like a decade old and stale.

Regular Rod
12-18-2013, 05:44 AM
Hi everyone,
I have been looking all over the internet for a good professional color negative film for landscape, but I can't find it.
I have been using Kodak's portra vc in 35mm version, and just shot a 120 roll of portra Nc with my new 6x7.

I shoot artpictures, always landscapes/cityscapes. I don't need my photo's to be extremely colorish. I just want them to be corresponding to what I see.

Portra obviousy is made for portraits. At my artschool everyone is using portra.... But portrait is not what I am shooting.
Anyone any ideas for a film? evything is welcome, also any other comments on portra.

Best regards Sam

Portra is very good for landscapes, but I prefer Ektar 100. The colours seem to me to be more natural and the grain is very fine indeed.

RR

Alan Klein
12-18-2013, 08:43 AM
I hope after 7 years you've chosen a film to use for landscapes. You are still shooting film, aren't you? :)

Sirius Glass
12-18-2013, 10:52 AM
I use Kodak Portra 400 unless there is the subject is highly colorful such as sunrises, sunsets, red rock in the Four Corners Area of the US then I use Kodak Ultra Color 400 or Kodak Vivid Color from my stash in the freezer. The advantage of the Hasselblad or any MF camera that has changeable film backs or LF is that one can change film backs without lossing frames.