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Markok765
06-23-2006, 09:36 PM
I dont take photos of homeless, druggies, preformers when asking, and petty criminals and drunks.
I DO however take photos of anyone with a camera.
What about you?

DBP
06-23-2006, 09:38 PM
What, no poll?

Markok765
06-23-2006, 09:40 PM
What, no poll?
I guess i could make a multi-option poll with diffrent choices. but i would have to add choises after ppl make suggestions

waynecrider
06-23-2006, 10:34 PM
I try not to have the street showing too much.

Markok765
06-23-2006, 10:36 PM
Someone once said. if your phots age not good, get closer. my teacher says fill the framw whth the subject

DBP
06-23-2006, 11:04 PM
"If your pictures aren't good enough, you're not close enough," - Robert Capa

But while his photographs are worthy, I would not advise follwing in his footsteps.

Markok765
06-23-2006, 11:14 PM
"If your pictures aren't good enough, you're not close enough," - Robert Capa

But while his photographs are worthy, I would not advise follwing in his footsteps.
Why would you advise that

HerrBremerhaven
06-23-2006, 11:25 PM
Robert Capa stepped on a land mine in Vietnam. He also came quite close to being shot on numerous occaissions. Someone else might fill in more details, though if you are interested in him and his images, he is quite the interesting photographer to read about.

Ciao!

Gordon

Mike Kennedy
06-24-2006, 02:54 AM
Good list Marko. I would also include drunks and petty criminals.

Most of my street photography is devoid of 2 legged critters. I figure that pointing a camera at someone,without their approval , is pretty rude.I don't want MY photo taken when I'm out and about and figure most folks feel the same way. If you do ask first then all you get is a badly posed "Year Book" type of shot.

Mike

Andy K
06-24-2006, 02:59 AM
Street Photography: What dont you take photos of?

Kids. Just isn't worth the hassle.

gnashings
06-24-2006, 03:27 AM
Given an attention span just a tad longer than that of a hamster on crystal meth, one could scroll half way down this very forum and find.... a long and involved discussion of street photography! Fancy that.
Also, this is supposed to be creative and individual - what do YOU want to photograph?

Peter.

Roger Hicks
06-24-2006, 03:46 AM
I don't want MY photo taken when I'm out and about... Mike

Why not?

Cheers,

Roger (www.rogerandfrances.com)

kunihiko
06-24-2006, 04:19 AM
a combo of a showy young girl and a gent which doesn't look like family.

anyte
06-24-2006, 09:17 AM
Most of my street photography is devoid of 2 legged critters. I figure that pointing a camera at someone,without their approval , is pretty rude.I don't want MY photo taken when I'm out and about and figure most folks feel the same way. If you do ask first then all you get is a badly posed "Year Book" type of shot.

Mike

Thank you. I hate that some people think they have a right to photograph me (or anyone else) just because I was so unfortunate as to have to leave my home to get a gallon of milk or mail a bill. I like photographing things, but I do not like being photographed and the idea that there may be people out there photographing me without my permission or knowledge troubles me.

For the record, I don't shoot street photography. I just read a bit of everything for the learning.

firecracker
06-24-2006, 09:22 AM
Trouble kids (underage) in their troubled moments with the law.

Troy
06-24-2006, 10:09 AM
There's nothing I don't shoot. I'm in automatic mode when street shooting. Editing what's OK or not OK comes later, when I'm looking at the contacts. If I have to stop and ponder in the street it's often too late to shoot the moment I was thinking about shooting. It's the nature of the genre.

As an aside, why do some of us take the time to write in a forum just to say this has already been talked about? Seems like a waste of time to me.

Roger Hicks
06-24-2006, 10:15 AM
Thank you. I hate that some people think they have a right to photograph me (or anyone else) just because I was so unfortunate as to have to leave my home to get a gallon of milk or mail a bill. I like photographing things, but I do not like being photographed and the idea that there may be people out there photographing me without my permission or knowledge troubles me..

Again: why?

I am genuinely puzzled by this.

Cheers,

Roger

gnashings
06-24-2006, 12:31 PM
There's nothing I don't shoot. I'm in automatic mode when street shooting. Editing what's OK or not OK comes later, when I'm looking at the contacts. If I have to stop and ponder in the street it's often too late to shoot the moment I was thinking about shooting. It's the nature of the genre.

As an aside, why do some of us take the time to write in a forum just to say this has already been talked about? Seems like a waste of time to me.


Because someone may not be aware of that fact, and may want to read through a much more extensive thread on that topic they may not be aware of. This generally happens to newer people, and they sit and wonder why this bunch of snobs don't chime in on their topics - all the while its because they already responded at length elsewhere on the same topic.
But I guess you can just ignore people - that'll learn 'em!
Of course, when the thread is almost exactly two lines down from the one you started... well, then I just do it to be a smart ass. Do you mind?
:D

Peter.

Markok765
06-24-2006, 04:37 PM
I agree, if your not with your wife or something, ppl WILL consider you a pedophile.
Thats the answer to the post from andy k about photgraphing kids

Bob Carnie
06-24-2006, 05:25 PM
Shooting the homeless, sick ederly, and those enhanced with life struggling problems.

These topics should be photographed, with sensitivity to the subjects and also with an ability to show a possible solution to their problems.
It is very easy to walk in any city or countryside worldwide and find the above topics and photograph.
What you do with the images, what advococy you bring to the causes, that is important. Injustice, poverty is worldwide, the camera can expose this.
How you as a photographer can tell the story and bring forth some solutions is important.
I think Salgado was not the first to photograph the displaced people of this world, but he made sure their plight was recognized.
A casual sampling of homelessness just does not cut it today, How do you as a photographer offer something to their situation, that is what is important.