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Dan Fromm
07-12-2006, 11:14 AM
Yup, found that. The shutter is a Supermatic with an Ektar 127mm in it - a stunningly contrasty lens. It is great for handheld shots - now where did I put that pack of #5 flashbulbs...
I'm going to try and get another speed graphic without lens to strip down and turn into a field camera as I don't really want to mess with the accuracy of the camming on my current Graphic.

LachlanWhy ruin a pefectly good camera? The tubular VF slides off, if you think it will get in the way. The RF adds little weight, and once removed from the camera its parts will slowly disappear. You're young and should be able to bear the weight.

Lachlan Young
07-12-2006, 11:24 AM
Why ruin a pefectly good camera? The tubular VF slides off, if you think it will get in the way. The RF adds little weight, and once removed from the camera its parts will slowly disappear. You're young and should be able to bear the weight.

No, I am not going to ruin my current working Speed Graphic but I am looking for another Speed Graphic with a knackered RF & possibly a dead body shutter too - there is a good page on Jon Grepstad's site about refinishing a Crown Graphic into a field camera and I don't see why the same couldn't be done to a Speed.

Lachlan

Dan Fromm
07-12-2006, 12:08 PM
No, I am not going to ruin my current working Speed Graphic but I am looking for another Speed Graphic with a knackered RF & possibly a dead body shutter too - there is a good page on Jon Grepstad's site about refinishing a Crown Graphic into a field camera and I don't see why the same couldn't be done to a Speed.

LachlanUm, the only advantage a butchered Speed has over a butchered Crown is greater maximum extension. The Speed will weigh more, but as I've remarked you're young and probably strong.

The two advantages a butchered Crown has over a butchered Speed are somewhat less weight and shorter minimum extension.

A Speed with a working focal plane shutter can use lenses in barrel. They're often relatively inexpensive. Since you're a student and probably short of cash a Speed with a good FPS -- hang the add'l weight and inability to use short lenses -- may make best sense for you.

Cheers,

Dan

Donald Qualls
07-12-2006, 09:30 PM
Well, and "short lenses" in terms of not working with a Speed means shorter than 90 mm. A Crown can focus infinity with a 65 mm, but if you're a student short on funds, you're very unlikely to afford a 65 mm that will cover 4x5.

The *other* advantage of a Speed is that you can get them in pre-Pacemaker models, like the Anniversary. No movements to speak of (though I don't see any reason you couldn't fabricate a replacement front standard to support fall, swings, and tilts in addition to the stock rise and shifts), but the simple 4x4 rabetted lens board is something anyone with access to a table saw and adjustable hole saw can turn out in half an hour each, plus glue drying time. The stamped boards for the Pacemaker Speed and Crown are much harder to come by, and more expensive; with an Anny or pre-Anny, there's no excuse for not having each lens on its own board.

Lachlan Young
07-13-2006, 08:51 AM
A Speed with a working focal plane shutter can use lenses in barrel. They're often relatively inexpensive. Since you're a student and probably short of cash a Speed with a good FPS -- hang the add'l weight and inability to use short lenses -- may make best sense for you.


That was pretty close to what I am looking for - ideally with a non functioning RF, knackered body leather, and with a dead or missing viewfinder but with a functioning body shutter and otherwise in good mechanical condition. An Anniversary Speed, or pre Anniversary, or Pacemaker Speed in the above condition would be quite acceptable - anyway I am not really intending to use WA lenses, well no wider than 90mm anyway.

Thanks for the advice,

Lachlan

Paul Howell
07-13-2006, 03:29 PM
You may want to look for a Graflex, like a Speed but a 4X5 SLR, they were also make in 41/4 X 3 1/4. Not as handy as a good working Range Finder, but usable. ICA and few other firms made 4X5 SLRs.

Chan Tran
07-14-2006, 03:07 PM
More than 20 years ago I bought an old Polaroid 150 for $15. I probably over paid for it at that time. I shot a few roll of polaroid roll film and then I couldn't get the film any more. I went out and get me a box of 10 sheet 4x5 of Kodak Vericolor type S film (It's called portra now I think) and simply put a sheet of film in the camera and close the back. I used a changing bag to do this. It took aprox 3.5x4.5 image on the 4x5 sheet. The result was actually very good.

theandy
07-16-2006, 12:49 PM
I think it's just a matter of fun to shoot with an old, "cheap" camera. When it comes to terms I choose my good camera of course. But somehow it's more fun to take pictures with an old model, maybe even a box camera. It's that special "feeling" when you hold it in your hands, feeling the weight, the shape, the form.
I don't expect the best pictures from those cameras, sometimes the result doesn't even matter to me but rather the whole process before.
I recently bought an Lubitel 166 U Box camera and I don't know wether it is good in handling or taking pictures... I just hope it works :-)
Has anyone experiences with that camera?

Andy

Ole
07-16-2006, 01:04 PM
... with a non functioning RF, knackered body leather, and with a dead or missing viewfinder but with a functioning body shutter and otherwise in good mechanical condition. An Anniversary Speed, or pre Anniversary, ...

That's what I've just bought, except the only thing which seems to be missing is the lens board. That doesn't matter, since I have a small stack of them. It remains to be seen whether I can mount my smallest iris holder on one and still fit it to the camera - if I can, then that's my new Aplanat test bed. ;)

Lachlan Young
07-16-2006, 02:24 PM
That's what I've just bought, except the only thing which seems to be missing is the lens board. That doesn't matter, since I have a small stack of them. It remains to be seen whether I can mount my smallest iris holder on one and still fit it to the camera - if I can, then that's my new Aplanat test bed. ;)


I'm going green with envy!! :)

Lachlan

Ole
07-26-2006, 10:04 AM
That's what I've just bought, except the only thing which seems to be missing is the lens board. That doesn't matter, since I have a small stack of them. It remains to be seen whether I can mount my smallest iris holder on one and still fit it to the camera - if I can, then that's my new Aplanat test bed. ;)

It's here!

Pre Anniversary model, functioning Kalart rangefinder, functioning focal plane shutter and all. No "tubular viewfinder" though, but I swear I saw one in a drawer somewhere. And a set of masks, too?

There was a lens board included. Not that I realy needed it - by digging through some odd boxes I found no less than 12 (!) boards! Anyone need one?

The small iris mount will - mount, and without interfering with anything. Weehee!!

Now I just need to find some screws which are both long enough and thin enough to mount it with, and I'll be shooting old barrel lenses at 1/500th of a second. :D

ricksplace
07-26-2006, 10:46 AM
[QUOTE=Ole]It's here!

Pre Anniversary model, functioning Kalart rangefinder, functioning focal plane shutter and all.

Ole -I have the same camera. What a blast to use! I have many barrel lenses that I use, each with its own board (since they're so easy to make). Some of the old enlarging lenses give beautiful images when stopped down to f16 or so. I have a 161mm Enlarging Ektanon that works surprisingly well. If you happen to use a beseler enlarger as I do, the 4X4 lensboards fit perfectly on the pre-anny. Talk about versatile!

My camera has the dreaded "graflex" back, which I think is great. I have four bagmags loaded which gives me 48 shots. The rangefinder is set for a 127/4.7 Ektar. With a bagmag and that lens, it's focus with the rangefinder, shoot, cycle the bagmag, repeat. No filmholders banging around and twice as many shots as a graphmatic. The bagmags come up on ebay every so often, and they're not that expensive.

Enjoy.

Rick.

Ole
07-26-2006, 11:35 AM
... I have many barrel lenses that I use, each with its own board (since they're so easy to make). ...

That's a thought - I have enough lens boards!

But for the old lenses without retaining ring or flange, the small iris mount is perfect :)

Gerald Koch
07-26-2006, 12:24 PM
The thing to rememberr about old box cameras like the Kodak Brownie is that their simple lenses are optimized for subjects at near distances, say between 6 to 12 feet. If you stay within this range they are capable of taking quite good photographs.

Schlapp
07-26-2006, 12:43 PM
I've read this thread with great interest since I shoot mostly, no, almost entirely on what have been called crappy old cameras.
One of my cameras came from a rubbish skip yet once cleaned gives great results [Franka Rolfix 6x9]. I now have another of these now given to me complete with 6x6 mask.
Lenses are suprisingly good on some of these beasts. My Agfa Record -Apotar and the Voigtlander Perkeo I -Vaskar are sharp as you like. The KOWA 6mm is a brilliant tool.
Others have charm and a wonderful softness about them. My Cosmic 35 brings out something in the images that I can get from no other lens. And the Houghton & Butcher box is my fav box of the lot - despite it's simple construction in wood - and produces lovely images.
But, and this is the main point, all are fun and engaging to work with. Nothing automatic or semi-automatic to help you. They are wonderful cheap tools in the making of an image - and surely, having fun and making images are what it's all about.

Ole
07-27-2006, 10:42 AM
The deed is done.

Now my new old Speed Graphic "pre-Anniversary" sports a modified aluminium lensboard with an iris lens mount mounted at a slight angle. I found the best candidate for mounting the iris was an aluminium board with the right size hole (saved a lot of cutting), drilled and tapped four holes, screwed the iris on, and there it is! My new Aplanat-shooter!

I must admit it looks rather nice - I just put a Meyer Aristoplan F:7,2 No.5 270mm on to try it. That's the absolutely largest lens that can be put in that iris. :)

Donald Qualls
07-28-2006, 01:31 PM
I just put a Meyer Aristoplan F:7,2 No.5 270mm on to try it. That's the absolutely largest lens that can be put in that iris. :)

Not to mention very close to the longest lens that can be focused to useful distances on that camera. IIRC, your maximum bellows is under 300 mm...