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Early Riser
08-08-2006, 07:45 PM
I like landscape, preferably B&W.

David Henderson
08-08-2006, 08:44 PM
I like antiques and I like modern painting. By which I mean that amongst a mass of uninteresting and downright unpleasant material there is a small proportion of items that I enjoy greatly. It's the same with landscape photography. Most examples have little or a sharply transient appeal, but sometimes I see photographs that excite and inspire me. They can be in colour or b&w, but either way they are likely to be an imaginative and individual way of treating a subject rather than a piece of national park in nice light. They are as likely to be an urban scene as a wilderness.

I'm finding it increasingly difficult to become enthused by simply capturing an attractive place in good light- whether I've done it or its someone else's work. The application of imagination and/or some element of personal style is now much more important to me than the accurate, natural rendition of a scene as it appears to the eye.

bjorke
08-08-2006, 10:58 PM
df, I liked your shot and the fact that it was neither stock golden-hour beach nor a post-Adams brutalised landscape but something at once contemporary in feel and beautiful.


there is a great deal more to be said in the key of C major.

bjorke
08-09-2006, 04:35 AM
As to the original question I'd say B&W because I dislike dealing with labs. My current project is making me rethink that (and unlike most of my recent-years color work, I don't want to do it in digital).

http://www.apug.org/gallery/data/2/Aug06g-11-apug.jpg

roteague
08-09-2006, 01:58 PM
I've avoided answer this question, because in my case the answer would be quite obvious, and because I wanted to provide more depth in my reasons.

Yes, I like landscapes, and I only do them in color. I see nothing wrong or limiting in B&W, but B&W fails to meet my vision. When I walk around during the day, I constantly amazed at the vibrant color I see around me, simple things like the color of the sky, the water, even cars and buildings.

Color is part of our natural world. It impacts even how we feel about ourselves and the world around us, and can impart a sense of "moment". When I am out photographing, this sense of "moment" is what I am striving to capture. For example, in the following image:

http://www.visionlandscapes.com/Images/HI5074A.jpg

In this image, the moment includes the movement of the wave as it crashes on the shore, it includes the hightlight of the sun on the plants in the foreground, it includes the reflection of the sun on the sand. This is a moment that has happened, and will never happen again.

I know a lot of people, including some here, want to dismiss the idea of color landscapes as simply "trite" or "colorful calendar" art, but to do so, IMO, shows a lack of awareness of what can be seen in the natural world. Some people see their photography as a means of expressing the "art" within them, but I see my photography as a means of expressing the glory of the world that we live in. We live in an ugly world, my images are my attempt to bring about a sense of beauty.

Dinesh
08-09-2006, 02:09 PM
Great image, and an even better explanation of your choice.

bjorke
08-09-2006, 02:11 PM
We live in an ugly world, my images are my attempt to bring about a sense of beauty.And that's certainly a pretty pic and illustrative of your desire for a 'moment' (exactly what I thought about even before reading your description).

Given that we do live in a world that contains so many postcards and calendars, are there ways to excercise your sense of beauty beyond the obvious sources (I've spent plenty of time on the windward beaches too -- and know well that they are beutiful without having to do much extra work)? I think your desire for a 'moment' is a step in that direction

jimcollum
08-09-2006, 03:25 PM
I'll go either way, depending on the scene and the impact. when shooting film, i'd ususally carry both color and b/w holders.

http://www.jcollum.com/fm/portage-ice-4a.jpg


or

http://www.jcollum.com/BW/web_silver-surf2.jpg

either could have worked with the other's film.. i felt the most impact emotionally with the way there were captured.

roteague
08-09-2006, 04:42 PM
Love that top image, Jim. I can feel the cold all the way over here in Hawaii.

roteague
08-09-2006, 04:44 PM
And that's certainly a pretty pic and illustrative of your desire for a 'moment' (exactly what I thought about even before reading your description).

Thanks bjorke. Moment is what made HCB the renowned photographer he was.

Claire Senft
08-09-2006, 05:19 PM
Yes, both, equally.

jimcollum
08-09-2006, 07:32 PM
since it's been asked, the black 'sky' in the iceflow shot is actually the bottom part of another iceberg behind it. the bottom half was covered with dirt/mud. placing that as black, allowed me to keep detail in the highlights in the flows in the foreground (although when printing on cibachrome, it requires a good contrast mask). Fuji 4x5 RDP

naturephoto1
08-10-2006, 01:24 AM
Hi Jim,

I agree with Robert, I like the first image of the iceflow very much as well. I have not personally had the opportunity yet to see blue ice; but I have heard about and I have seen other photos.

Rich

DanielOB
05-31-2008, 05:00 PM
Color photographs are made and will be made. However color is not given to photography just because noway to control it. Doing color photograhy always endup as: it comes what comes, out of control, and photog has only one choice, yes it is I want, nice. There are so many variables influencing colors that it is all just random.
If anyone ever think this is not correct ask yourself how you can get (e.g.) alizarin crimson of specific value and chroma?
So I think, not just landscape, but the whole photography revolve around B&W. If one wish colors there are other mediums beter addapted to such request.

Daniel OB
www.Leica-R.com

mark
06-01-2008, 10:02 PM
That is funny Daniel. You are not serious are you. If you are I would suggest you read works by Joe Cornish, Jack Dykinga, Freeman Patterson and I am sure others here can name a few others.

Painting and photography are two different mediums.

Wyno
06-01-2008, 11:17 PM
I prefer to do landscape photography, and I do most of my owrk in Black and White. Here in Australia colour is so expensive. Over $10 for each sheet of film and then $20 to process it. Then scanning, then a print. Ouch.
Mike

patricia de roeck
06-02-2008, 01:44 AM
Been doing a bit of pondering on this lately because I have 3 backs for my Bronica 645, one for B&W slow, one for B&W fast and one for Velvia film - just realised the other day that my colour back had only 2 exposures over a 10 month period while I've been racing through the other film. I'm simply passionate about landscape and the way light plays across it - its just beguiling and I only seem to interpret it into the black and white tonal range when I look at it, so I guess I've caught mono-mania. I've noticed lately that the colour images at Galleries and Exhibtions seem to very lurid and unsubtle and wondered if it was to do with the fact that most of the curators are 40 and under and after a lifetime of visual exposure to the cartoon colours of TV, film and Games, they just don't have an emotional response to anything that isn't 'in your face"., when selecting work to hang. Never seem to see images with the depth and subtlety like those of Joe Cornish or Charlie Waite etc. Just a theory, but its interesting. Maybe when your're waaaay over 40 like I am you just drift into a creative Zen state and apply the KISS theory to just about everything.
Wyno from the Big Island will probably understand when I say that I actually moved here just for the light, truly magical.
Patricia

Wyno
06-02-2008, 04:54 AM
You're right Patricia, the light is special in Tassie. I've only been there once (last year) but I want to see more, so I'm coming back. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED. LOL.
Mike

mark
06-02-2008, 10:59 AM
I am only able to shoot one type of film at a time. If I carry both BW and color I shoot only one. For me they take two different mind sets. I have found myself shooting more color lately and really enjoying it.

COlor is not as expensive here in the states as there so I can burn through the film and not feel guilty.

jovo
06-02-2008, 11:55 AM
I've noticed lately that the colour images at Galleries and Exhibtions seem to very lurid and unsubtle and wondered if it was to do with the fact that most of the curators are 40 and under and after a lifetime of visual exposure to the cartoon colours of TV, film and Games, they just don't have an emotional response to anything that isn't 'in your face"., when selecting work to hang.

That's an interesting observation since a lot of NYC galleries have been showing large, larger, and largest color work in anything but hyper-color....washed out in fact. But, the notion that under 40ish curators are cartoon conditioned makes me wonder if those galleries are run by much older gallerists. Again, interesting.