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Gay Larson
08-16-2006, 08:14 PM
I would love to have a macro forum. I want to learn more about macro. Many times I have read forums with questions I didn't know to ask and have learned a great deal. I think it is important to remember that the APUG community is comprised of many levels of expertise and it is good to try to serve all. Perhaps we should divide the forums into beginner, intermediate and advanced or pro. Then when a beginner asked a beginners question in the pro forum, they can be banished immediately to the beginners forum. (I'm kidding)

Bruce Osgood
08-16-2006, 08:52 PM
Cate said as well as anybody could. I agree.

A Macro forum can be as valuable as Large Format/ULF/Alternate Process forums.

anyte
08-17-2006, 05:27 PM
I see that you've got the idea.

The typical question about macro raised on photo.net is a short one that requires a long answer. Writing a long answer can be a pain; IMO asking for one can be an imposition. And answers to most of the questions raised there and here are fairly easy to find.

I'm sorry that you're tired and that your blood sugar is low. Hope you sleep better tonight and eat better tomorrow.

Cheers,

Dan

Thank you for the kind words. I think I'm all caught up on my sleeping and eating now.

Writing a long answer is a pain, but we need not feel compelled to respond to every post in which we have something to contribute. I replied, even while overly tired, because I was already invested in the discussion. I will not post to some discussions because I know from the outset that I do not wish to invest the time in presenting my views or addressing replies.

I know that it can be frustrating to those who feel compelled to correct poorly given or inaccurate advice, but this is where a person must decide to either check out and let it go as a learning experience or provide a simple link or book recommendation that will clear up inaccuracies. There is no need to provide lengthy explanations when a simple link or two will suffice.

I think I have made my point and I believe I understand the points you make, but, on that note, I think this is where I step down and just read (no guarantees though). :) This has been a pleasant exchange and I thank you for that.


Annette

glbeas
08-18-2006, 04:49 PM
I think we could probably have as a first message in the forum a FAQ list for folks to browse through when searching for answers and the OP could possibly update it when something interesting surfaces that is relevant. This might save some frustration here and there.

df cardwell
08-18-2006, 07:24 PM
There has been a lot of juggling based on the premise that beginners will irritate knowledgeable experts.

My teachers were very patient with me when I began in macroscopy. Very patient. I can't pay them back, but I'm happy to share what little remains of what I was taught :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

There tend to be two types of macro photographer, one who has a picture they want to make and just needs a little guidance to get there. Then there are the ones who want to argue theory. We'll see who wants to participate.

It might be good to begin, and just see how it goes. If there comes a time when new APUG members, or new macro shooters, become an irritation, an FAQ would pretty much write itself.

Sean
08-29-2006, 03:23 PM
The Macro Photography forum is up :)

Thanks,
Sean

David A. Goldfarb
08-29-2006, 05:22 PM
Okay, to get the ball rolling, I've moved a bunch of related threads from other forums into the Macro Forum.

Aggie
08-29-2006, 06:00 PM
TY Sean and David

copake_ham
08-29-2006, 06:10 PM
Late to the thread but I second Aggie's comment.

I've always wanted to learn about Macro. I'll make a point of viewing the new forum and learning from some the experts!

naturephoto1
08-29-2006, 06:16 PM
Thanks Sean and David for setting up the new forum.

Rich

catem
08-30-2006, 07:39 AM
Yes, thanks to Sean and David - it's good to have everything in one place and easy to find!

Cate

Carol
08-30-2006, 07:49 AM
May I add my thanks to Sean and David. Your work is much appreciated.

Tom Hicks
09-02-2006, 10:19 PM
Anupam, congrates on getting this forum started. I think it will take off and be a very active forum for APUG. You have your work cut out.

For others that don't know me , I started and moderate the macro forum at www.fredmiranda.com . Yes there will be the same questions asked over and over again . And with over 18,433 post later they are still being asked . I started a Macro resource link on the forum where we put links to all types of macro , equipment , articles etc . even with that and directing members to it , they still ask the same ? over and over . Most younger photogs seem to be to lazy to do the research on their on even when they have the greatest resource right onder their fingers , (Anupam I think is one exception to this ,because one of the times I was in contact with him he was in the library.
unlike the old guys where we had to go to the library for research, they tend to ask and hope other will do the research for them . there is no way around this sorry to say . Most beginners in macro photograph don't want to put in the time or investment to experiment and learn from their on mistakes. I found the best way to teach macro was for me to take the initiative, produce some work, post it and have them ask how I did it , posting pics of the setup , stiring there intrest , then challeging them to do the same , with monthly assignment. Through these assignment , and experimentation , we all learned .

Writing article, giving tips and posting shots of setups and pics are always helpful.

Examples :

Basic Composition
http://www.shutterfreaks.com/Tips/tomhicksBasicComposition.html

Seeing Photographs
http://www.shutterfreaks.com/Tips/tomhicksSeeingPhotographs.html

Macro for beginners
http://www.shutterfreaks.com/Tips/tomhicksmacros.html

Good luck to everyone here , and thanks to the those involved in getting this going, Anupam don't be a stranger, come see me . I mostly lurk here , I have a renewed intrest in the analog way of photography, so I will be popping in to learn as well .

Good luck,

Tom Hicks
www.natureswildscapes.com

roteague
09-02-2006, 11:21 PM
Examples :

Basic Composition
http://www.shutterfreaks.com/Tips/tomhicksBasicComposition.html

Seeing Photographs
http://www.shutterfreaks.com/Tips/tomhicksSeeingPhotographs.html

Macro for beginners
http://www.shutterfreaks.com/Tips/tomhicksmacros.html



Thanks Tom, I enjoyed the articles and the images contained in them.

Not to distract from the value of what you posted, but unfortunately, ShutterFreaks seems too much like a digi lovers paradise for my tastes - every person in the "Our Team" page has the same story "photography came alive when I went digital". Do you happen to know of any of web site that focuses on macro, and whose main point of reference is film, not digital?

Tom Hicks
09-02-2006, 11:40 PM
Thanks Tom, I enjoyed the articles and the images contained in them.

Not to distract from the value of what you posted, but unfortunately, ShutterFreaks seems too much like a digi lovers paradise for my tastes - every person in the "Our Team" page has the same story "photography came alive when I went digital". Do you happen to know of any of web site that focuses on macro, and whose main point of reference is film, not digital?

Robert I don't know of any, but please remember that everything in macro is basicly the same be it for digital or film . I will try to put in what I know and may start some threads here , on rev of lens and post pics of the setup. hope this helps .

Amupam has started something great here , we just all need to nurture it and watch it grow.

Tom

hortense
09-02-2006, 11:41 PM
Don't know what to say now that we are all straight on this forum!
However, Welcome to your new forum. I expect to learn a lot. Just got 16mm and 32mm Hasselblad tubes. What I am trying to learn is how to mount delicate/awkward specimens on some sort of pedestal or whatever. Lighting. I use soft window light but should use a gauze tent.

roteague
09-02-2006, 11:50 PM
Robert I don't know of any, but please remember that everything in macro is basicly the same be it for digital or film . I will try to put in what I know and may start some threads here , on rev of lens and post pics of the setup. hope this helps.

Thanks Tom, I am looking forward to your contributions. I recently purchased a book "Close-Up & Macro - A Photographer's Guide" by Robert Thompson, and am truly interested in the process. One thing in particular that I am interested in is doing macro with Large Format, although I am not adverse to doing it in MF or 35mm.

Ole
09-03-2006, 07:07 AM
... Just got 16mm and 32mm Hasselblad tubes. ...
By pure coincidence I just got a pair of MF tubes too - 14 and 42mm tubes for Bronica ETRS. I'm going to have fun. And do lots of old mistakes all over again. :)

David H. Bebbington
09-03-2006, 08:53 AM
Robert I don't know of any, but please remember that everything in macro is basicly the same be it for digital or film . I will try to put in what I know and may start some threads here , on rev of lens and post pics of the setup. hope this helps .

Amupam has started something great here , we just all need to nurture it and watch it grow.

Tom
One big difference is that with LF film you need more magnification to fill the frame! I cannot recall seeing anyone but scientific specialists practising macro photography at anything bigger than 1x to 1.5x life size. LF macro is a different world, covering the range of roughly 1x to 10x life size. Compared with smaller formats, it can be very cheap - lenses such as the Tominons sold for the Polaroid MP3/MP4 sell for not too much, no other special accessories are required, just a means of focusing by moving the whole camera (or the subject - otherwise you will go insane!) - and the brightest cold light source you can find! And of course a good working knowledge of exposure increase factors as a function of bellows extension!

Regards,

David

Tom Hicks
09-03-2006, 09:03 AM
One big difference is that with LF film you need more magnification to fill the frame! I cannot recall seeing anyone but scientific specialists practising macro photography at anything bigger than 1x to 1.5x life size. LF macro is a different world, covering the range of roughly 1x to 10x life size. Compared with smaller formats, it can be very cheap - lenses such as the Tominons sold for the Polaroid MP3/MP4 sell for not too much, no other special accessories are required, just a means of focusing by moving the whole camera (or the subject - otherwise you will go insane!) - and the brightest cold light source you can find! And of course a good working knowledge of exposure increase factors as a function of bellows extension!

Regards,

David

David, I forget you guys shoot alot of MF and Lf , that's above my head, and have no clue to the challenges ya'll face in that world . but if I hang around here I know I will learn and look forward to it. I have a limited knowledge of macro that I can share but it will be 35mm based.

Tom