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John Bragg
09-13-2006, 10:03 AM
Hi Folks, This is one of the many pictures taken by the late James Ravilious. He loved using older Leica lenses and mastered the wonderful nature of uncoated optics in skilled hands. (He fashioned his own lens hoods to prevent fllare).


http://www.jamesravilious.com/gallerypic.asp?gallery_id=12

David H. Bebbington
09-13-2006, 10:23 AM
Is the picture you meant on this site?

http://www.jamesravilious.com/

Regards,

David

John Bragg
09-13-2006, 10:29 AM
Sorry David. It is on the Corbis site, and I can not get the link to work. I have posted an alternative from the site you suggested, equally as good.

Regards, John.

David H. Bebbington
09-13-2006, 11:42 AM
My main feeling about JR's photography is the way in which he is apparently totally in tune with his subject matter. As John says, he sought out good examples of uncoated Leica lenses, in no way as a collector but simply because they gave a unique image quality which was just right for him.

SuzanneR
09-13-2006, 11:54 AM
I love his work! I have never heard of him before, but there is a wonderful quality to his images, and he has captured rural life with such dignity. His work also reminds me of the French painter Millet. Thank you for pointing this work out. It's just wonderful!

John Bragg
09-13-2006, 12:09 PM
I love his work! I have never heard of him before, but there is a wonderful quality to his images, and he has captured rural life with such dignity. His work also reminds me of the French painter Millet. Thank you for pointing this work out. It's just wonderful!


Hi Suzanne,

He had a very strong affinity with painting, since his father was the painter Eric Ravilious.

Regards, John

blansky
09-13-2006, 01:09 PM
It must be the light there, but I find it fascinating the lack of contrast between the highlights and the shadows.

It's almost a 3:1 ratio in broad daylight, with the pattern of the trees creating shadows on the ground. In most places I've been the ration is far far higher.


They must have a very subdued partial cloudy/sunlight there.


Michael

Juraj Kovacik
09-13-2006, 01:43 PM
Light on his pictures is different from normal light. I don't know if it is only about lenses or something different - soft developer or what.

What I love on his pictures is his choose of scenes - everyday simple life. And yes, he can how to find and show beauty of it. Maybe I like his "point of view" more then that special light.

Curt
09-13-2006, 02:02 PM
It's very fine and could have been 1882. Are the members aware of the "Corbis" business? A certain billlllionair started the business to buy the rights to as many pictures as he can. Then for a fee you can rent a look at them under rigid conditions.

Gay Larson
09-13-2006, 04:20 PM
I lso had not see his work before but really love it. I had to check the dates myself because at first I thought is was much earlier. They make me want to visit there myself.

David H. Bebbington
09-13-2006, 08:36 PM
It must be the light there, but I find it fascinating the lack of contrast between the highlights and the shadows.

It's almost a 3:1 ratio in broad daylight, with the pattern of the trees creating shadows on the ground. In most places I've been the ration is far far higher.


They must have a very subdued partial cloudy/sunlight there.


Michael
This was in fact the reason why he used the old uncoated lenses - makes quite a difference. I knew someone once who did a series of pictures of a village in the South of France at midday, normally a total no-no because of the screaming contrast of the overhead sun, but he used an old Nikon F and original lens, which shortened the tone scale considerably and gave a very pleasing effect. I use an uncoated 5 cm Elmar myself from time to time for the same reason.

Regards,

David

blansky
09-13-2006, 10:05 PM
David, I'll take your word for it but I think it is more than just a lens that creates this effect. I think he worked in a softbox type of diffused thin layer of clouds.

Granted the lens may have had an effect but I doubt this much.


Michael

Dave Wooten
09-13-2006, 11:10 PM
John,

Thanks for posting this!

John Bragg
09-14-2006, 04:18 AM
[QUOTE=Dave Wooten]John,

Thanks for posting this![/QUOTE

It,s a pleasure. A few more technical details on Ravilious, technique; He favoured Tri-X pull processed in D76 @ 250 iso as far as I recall. He printed all his own, until a skin condition prevented this in latter years.

Regards, John.

Jeff Voorhees
09-28-2006, 05:23 PM
I happened upon "An English Eye" in a used bookstore a couple years ago. Funny enough, I've been going through for the past week. His mastery of uncoated optics and his development techinque make for beautifully produced photographs. What I'd like to see is how he masked "a proprietary Leitz" model hood so he could shoot into the sun.

tom_micklin
09-28-2006, 05:34 PM
It's beautiful work. I love the softness.

childers-jk
09-28-2006, 06:07 PM
Forgive me if I am wrong, but it looks like two of these picutures were taken either into the sun or with a very strong side light. (I'm juding by the shadows.) With an uncoated lens and even an impovised hood, would this tend to cause the very soft feeling and lack of harsh contrast? Either way, I really like these a lot, thanks for posting.

copake_ham
09-28-2006, 08:17 PM
Forgive me if I am wrong, but it looks like two of these picutures were taken either into the sun or with a very strong side light. (I'm juding by the shadows.) With an uncoated lens and even an impovised hood, would this tend to cause the very soft feeling and lack of harsh contrast? Either way, I really like these a lot, thanks for posting.

I noticed that too. I also checked the gallery and noticed that many other shots have similar "soft shadows". So I'm inclined to think that it does have to do, in part, with the uncoated nature of the lenses (wouldn't coating result in some degree of polarizing?).

But I did notice that some of the shots that included "sky" showed partly cloudy conditions....so maybe he did favor "supple" conditions?

Oh, btw, the shots and subject matter are great - as I watch the Copake countryside slip away into exurbian sprawl - I wonder how idyllic these shots are and how much they were "selectively rural"?

catem
10-07-2006, 05:09 PM
I completely missed this thread!

Thanks for posting it, John. Wonderful work...

Cate

Charles Webb
10-07-2006, 11:06 PM
I had never heard of Ravilious the photographer, his work is in my opinion very, very good. I appreciate your posting his name etc.


Charlie...............................