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View Full Version : Discuss a Jeff Brouws Photograph



Jim Chinn
10-22-2006, 09:38 AM
time to post a new photo for consideration.

I remeber seeing this image in a magazine several years ago and then saw it again on the web. It is one of those "atmospheric" images that instantly take you to a time and place if you have experienced it.

I also love this image because it takes place at that perfect time of day, either prior to sunrise or after sunset when the ambient light and manmade light are balanced or one is just starting to gain primacy.

I assume this photo was made on film. I don't know what medium he works in today but here is a link to more of his work at Robert Klein Gallery: http://www.robertkleingallery.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=17849

His website:http://www.jeffbrouws.com/index.html

Jeff Brouws, Mobil, Highway 395, Inyokern, CA, 1990

Claire Senft
10-22-2006, 11:36 AM
I do not find this to be a photograph that interests me.

reellis67
11-06-2006, 03:31 PM
Jim,

I think I get where your feeling is coming from with this shot. I spent a lot of time on the road when I was younger (and wish I could spend more time there now) and I think that certain elements presented here really call to those memories. The old Pegasus is one for certain - it was a ubiquitous image on the road in the 70's, at least for me. The other thing that draws me is the old Air stream - another icon of the past.

I also like the lighting here, as you mentioned. That time of day is so fleeting that it always seems magical. Without these background experiences though, I can see why it would not impart the same feelings in others.

- Randy

blansky
11-06-2006, 04:52 PM
I like it in a nostalgic Route 66 kind of way.

There is always something sort of romantic as well as sad and lonely about the open road.

On a personal note in a great big who cares kind of way, I always feel the most lonely and most homesick at dusk when on the road. That is unless I'm parked in my hotel room or in a bar.


Michael

skillian
11-06-2006, 07:29 PM
I find some of Jeff's work to be quite interesting, particularly his book Approaching Nowhere. If you haven't looked closely at his Website, I highly recommend doing so.

reellis67
11-06-2006, 07:55 PM
Scott, I thought that name sounded familiar - I have his 'Readymades' book. I didn't remember until I browsed his site a bit.

Michael, I know what you mean. I get that way once the light is finaly gone - it takes the fun of being on the road with it. I have to say that I've never found a hotel room large enough to park in - bars, of course, are another matter, lots of room in a bar.

- Randy

bruce terry
11-06-2006, 09:58 PM
Strongly Egglestonian, this picture, as well as others on his site. Depersonalized in a good way, subtle color and yes, constructively depressing if you go with the flow.

My primary reaction is that square doesn't work here, holds the viewer too distant, doesn't sweep you and your feelings into the image like a rectanglar format would.

Still, the 'Mobil' in it connects as I worked for the company back then, when thousands of dealers had to be arm-wrestled away from the old and very dominant Flying Horse signs.

Bruce

Alex Hawley
11-06-2006, 10:21 PM
I like this one quite well. Pure Americana with some noir lighting. There were a few others of similar scenes done by other prominent photographers. I've liked all of them.

Jim, you sure about the year of the photo? From the looks of the vehicle and camping trailer, I would say more like 1960 than 1990. Think the Flying Horse logo was pretty much extinct by 1990 too.

Bill Mitchell
11-06-2006, 11:36 PM
"square doesn't work here, holds the viewer too distant, doesn't sweep you and your feelings into the image like a rectanglar format would"
Sounds like a PSA-approved critique at the local camera club. I don't buy it.

Alex Hawley
11-07-2006, 12:06 AM
Jim, you sure about the year of the photo? From the looks of the vehicle and camping trailer, I would say more like 1960 than 1990. Think the Flying Horse logo was pretty much extinct by 1990 too.

Never mind. I looked at his website and he was born in 1955. What a find that scene was!

bruce terry
11-07-2006, 03:00 PM
Bill Mitchell quoting bruce terry: "square doesn't work here, holds the viewer too distant, doesn't sweep you and your feelings into the image like a rectanglar format would"
Sounds like a PSA-approved critique at the local camera club. I don't buy it.


Hey Bill - You talk'n bout Me? A simple picture-taker who has never had need of a camera club or 'PSA' except in the context of the Prostate-Specific Antigen Test?

With the preface, understand my comment: "My personal reaction is square doesn't work here, etc." See, this stuff is out of my head, nobody else's. You say what I say is from some knee-jerk-know-it-all? Then you my friend gotta join me in The Box ... but since we are both very good guys I think we forget The Box, go knock someone else side of the head.

Bruce

Gay Larson
11-08-2006, 10:58 PM
It really speaks to me. My Dad was career Army and we moved almost every year. On the road a lot and I remember that sign a lot, when I needed to stop, he just kept on going.

David Henderson
11-09-2006, 06:11 AM
I like this a lot, and much of his other work; this is beautifully exposed/lit, perfectly composed in my view, and communicates the isolation of the environment really well. Besides which it reminds me of Hopper and that's rarely a bad thing. Interesting decision to exclude part of the vehicle and the tip of the canopy.

To me the photograph owes much to the extent of sky and foreground, which adds to its sparse nature. A rectangular approach would not have offered this and the ability to exclude part of the vehicle /canopy. Square is important to this photograph I think.