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ReallyBigCameras
01-16-2007, 02:50 PM
Kerry,

It was definitely one of the older ones, single coated and made in the late 1970s. I owned a 180mm version of the older lens and I am fairly certain it would cover 80 degrees, but the 360mm specimen definitely did not cover that much. I figure it was more like 75-77 degrees because it takes about 79 degrees to cover the 12X20 format and the one I had definitely missed. I thought I read somewhere that the longer versions of this lens, i.e. 360mm and 480mm, had slightly less coverage in degrees than the shorter ones, but I can not find the referene.

Sandy

Sandy,

I just went back and checked through my stack of old Fujinon brochures. From what I can tell, other than the coatings, there was no change to the design from the orignal 360mm f6.3 Fujinon-W until the 360mm f6.5 CM Fujinon-W was introduced in the mid-1990s.

The original Fujinon-W line, introduced in the early 1970s were single coated and advertised to cover 80 degrees at f22. Very early literature shows the coverage of all focal lengths from 135mm - 360mm to be 70 degrees wide open and 80 degrees at f22. A brochure I have from July, 1973 lists the image circle of the 360mm f6.3 Fujinon-W as 608mm at f22. By March of 1976, this figure had been reduced to 485mm (but the angular coverage was still listed as 80 degrees).

Starting around January 1979, the shorter members of the Fujinon-W line were redesigned. At that time, the EBC multicoated NWS line was introduced. A brochure dated January, 1979 includes both the older single coated WS line and several new NWS models. In the NWS series, the 135mm, 150mm and 180mm focal lengths were 6/6 construction. The 210mm NWS was a 6/5 design and the 250mm f6.3 was a 6/4 plasmat type. Coverage of the 6/6 designs was listed as 76 degrees. The 6/5 210mm design was rated to cover 71 degrees and the 250mm f6.3 model had only 64 degrees of coverage.

The two longer focal lengths, 300mm and 360mm, continued to be called W (or WS). They were now EBC multicoated, but continued to be groupd with the older, sngle coated WS line. Other than the coating change, the specs remained unchanged. Still, a 485mm mage circle and an incorrect 80 angular coverage. These specs remained unchanged until September, 1984 when someone finally noticed that the 485mm image circle spec didn't correlate with the claimed 80 degree coverage. At that time, the angular coverage was changed to 68 degrees to match the rated image circle. These specs, and the lens construction remained the same through the the mid-1990s when the NWS Fujinon-W line was discontinued and replaced by the current CM Fujinon-W line.

So, as far as I can tell, prior to the introduction of the CM-W line, there were no design changes to the 360mm f6.3 Fujinon-W. Specs caged, but they seem to be for the purpose of correcting errors, rather than reflecting actual design changes. Fujinon literature from the 1980s is full of errors. In one brochure I have from 1982, someone manually glued little tiny correction slips in several boxes in the specification tables to correct printed errors.

So, I'm hopeful that my multicoated 360mm f6.3 Fujinon-W will cover just as much as your older, single coated model. Based on Emile's report, it sounds like it might. In any case, it will cover at least 7x17 just based on the manufacturer's specs. Perhaps the usable coverage will be a bit more, maybe enough for 8x20 straight on, which would give me a bit of head room for movemens on 7x17.

Kerry

Rick Olson
01-16-2007, 04:35 PM
Kerry ... sure makes buying one of these Fuji lenses a little challenging with all of the different degree measures, images circles, etc.

Rick

ReallyBigCameras
01-16-2007, 05:05 PM
Kerry ... sure makes buying one of these Fuji lenses a little challenging with all of the different degree measures, images circles, etc.

Rick

Rick,

It was for this very reason I started collecting Fuji brochures several years ago and created my unofficial Fujinon LF lens pages (http://www.thalmann.com/largeformat/fujinon.htm). I also wrote a more detailed (and more up-to-date article on Fujinon lenses for View Camera. I think it was published in the Nov/Dec 2001 issue, but I'd have to check to be sure.

Fuji hasn't had an official US dstributor for their LF lenses since the late 1980s. With the new global economy and dealers like Badger Graphic and Midwest Photo Exchange, you can easily get new Fuji LF lenses, but information on older Fuji lenses is hard to come by.

Kerry

sanking
01-17-2007, 11:09 AM
Kerry ... sure makes buying one of these Fuji lenses a little challenging with all of the different degree measures, images circles, etc.

Rick


The same challenges exist with lenses by other manufactuerers when the issue is ULF. Virtually all lens manufacturers give coverage at f22 for projection type printing where several magnifications are involved. For ULF works, where we normally would never enlarge more than about 2X, one can generally use all of the circle of illumination (if you stop down enough), which is usually way more than stated coverage.

Another thing you have to take into consideration is that while the lens itself may provide X amount of coverage shutter mounting may reduce this coverage. In theory a 14ĘDagor should cover 12X20 with an inch or two of movements, but in practice many don┤t. In fact, I have even seen a 16.5ĘDagor that would not cover 12X20.

Sandy King

Rick Olson
01-17-2007, 08:40 PM
Sandy ... is there some type of factor or estimate for getting the estimated "full" image circle compared to what is published by the manufacturer at f-22? The Fuji 360mm that I have at the top of this thread has an image circle at 485 at f-22. What might I expect the "full" circle to be? What type of shutters might limit the circle? Is that called mechanical vignetting? Are the Copal 1 shutters less prone to this due to their larger size?

Thanks,
Rick

sanking
01-18-2007, 10:39 AM
Sandy ... is there some type of factor or estimate for getting the estimated "full" image circle compared to what is published by the manufacturer at f-22? The Fuji 360mm that I have at the top of this thread has an image circle at 485 at f-22. What might I expect the "full" circle to be? What type of shutters might limit the circle? Is that called mechanical vignetting? Are the Copal 1 shutters less prone to this due to their larger size?

Thanks,
Rick

The actual circle of illumination varies a lot even when we compare lenses of the same design, i.e. dagors, plasmats, etc. However, virtually all plasmats are capable of at least 70 degrees of coverage, and most are capable of 77 degrees or slightly more. However, the only factor I am aware of that you can use to determine actual coverage at the extreme limits for ULF work is the human factor, i.e. experience.

I am not personally familiar with the Fujinon L lens. Is this a tessar or plasmat type lens. If it is a tessar type the coverage should be less than for the plasmat type -W series, but it still should be enough to cover 7X17 with a couple of inches of movement.

Sandy King



Sandy King

Harrigan
01-18-2007, 12:18 PM
"Another thing you have to take into consideration is that while the lens itself may provide X amount of coverage shutter mounting may reduce this coverage."

Shutter mounting lenses does not change the lens image circle if done to the proper lens spacing pecs. If the lens spacing is altered this can and will effect the size of the image circle and cause other problems with abberations.

If you have a lens shutter mounted and the image circle is altered then most likely the lens spacing has not been properly matched to the original spec. I think commonly extreme wide angle lenses are spaced very tightly and when you shutter mount them this tight spacing might not be possible in a shutter mount, the lens spacing is altered thus effecting the lens image circle. Shutter mounting a lens alone should not have any effect on the image circle if done properly.

Colin Graham
01-18-2007, 08:16 PM
(Front-mounting can substantially reduce the image circle, where the shutter clips the light path, just to avoid confusion.)

sanking
01-19-2007, 10:59 AM
(Front-mounting can substantially reduce the image circle, where the shutter clips the light path, just to avoid confusion.)

Spacing that is too wide can definitely reduce coverage wtih wide angle designs. A shutter opening that is too small can also cause the lens to vignette, either with front mounting as above, or with regular mounting.

Sandy King

Harrigan
01-19-2007, 11:38 AM
Spacing that is too wide can definitely reduce coverage wtih wide angle designs. A shutter opening that is too small can also cause the lens to vignette, either with front mounting as above, or with regular mounting.

Sandy King

You are right a front mounted lens can get cut off by the shutter and vignette but only under very rare circumstances will a shutter vignette with a normal type mounting and only if if gets in the way of the lens or blocks the optics or some other rare circumstance. Perhaps a hypergon or a very long lens that is slowed down if f-opening by the shutter. These are rare circumstances but yes it can happen but not normally with regular lenses.

Luther
12-11-2011, 01:00 AM
I have the older 6.3 model, its MC, and use it on 11x14, without problems, even with 2-3 inches of front rise. Its an outstanding lens.

Hello All,

I am new to the Forum and obviously a late arriver to this thread. I just bought a Fujinon-W 360MM F6.3 W/Copal 3 shutter for US $395.00. I have a Fuji 300 C, which is supposed to provide complete 8x10 coverage. However, I thought that buying the Fujinon-W 360MM F6.3 will provide more than enough movement. I used the information in your thread to make the determination. The purchase includes a quality CoPal 3 shutter and the proper lens caps.
If any of you happen upon this thread again, please provide me some feed back on my buying decision as the Fujinon Compact 300mm/8.5 is now $1,199.99 at Badger Graphics in the USA. The cost of a new Fuji lens in the 300 mm range is now well over $1000.00. Used Fuji lenses at 300 mm and above are commanding premium prices.

FredW
12-11-2011, 02:02 AM
Hello All,

I am new to the Forum and obviously a late arriver to this thread. I just bought a Fujinon-W 360MM F6.3 W/Copal 3 shutter for US $395.00. I have a Fuji 300 C, which is supposed to provide complete 8x10 coverage. However, I thought that buying the Fujinon-W 360MM F6.3 will provide more than enough movement. I used the information in your thread to make the determination. The purchase includes a quality CoPal 3 shutter and the proper lens caps.
If any of you happen upon this thread again, please provide me some feed back on my buying decision as the Fujinon Compact 300mm/8.5 is now $1,199.99 at Badger Graphics in the USA. The cost of a new Fuji lens in the 300 mm range is now well over $1000.00. Used Fuji lenses at 300 mm and above are commanding premium prices.

You got a great deal, it has plenty of coverage for 8x10, I use it as my standard lens on 8x10. Though the lens is much bigger than the 300C, but the corresponding lens from Rodenstock and Schneider are much larger and heavier, at least that was what i recall from when I purchased some 20 years ago.