PDA

View Full Version : Sheet Film insert for Jobo Drum



Clueless
02-25-2007, 07:06 PM
Once, custom made for oversize film developing in Paper drums now no longer available but can be constructed DIY. For the second time someone has "found" my references. I have some images of the insert once again. Would it be useful to place someplace on the internet. As I just don't leave images setting on my computer please give me some directions.

jgjbowen
02-25-2007, 07:14 PM
With the increased demand for ULF, I hope somoene figures out how to, once again, make these custom inserts

Jim Noel
07-12-2007, 04:39 PM
I think beng on the web is a great idea, but I don't know how that is done. The only idea that pops into my head is perhaps a youtube link.

would it be possible for you to pm the images to me?

MattKing
07-12-2007, 05:50 PM
Why not post them into an Article here on APUG?

Matt

jp80874
07-13-2007, 06:00 AM
PM sent with email included:
Clueless,

I would be ever so grateful if you would send photos and or directions to my email. xxxxxxxxx. If it helps to specify, I am trying to develop three sheets of 7x17 at a time in a 3063 drum. Currently I do two sheets at a time in combined 2560 & 2830 tanks. My goal of course is to develop more sheets in the same amount of time with the same quality.

Thanks,

John Powers

Keith Pitman
07-14-2007, 02:14 AM
I've tried to get this info also from Clueless and others. No luck yet, however, here is a link showing the former Jobo product:

http://www.jobousadarkroom.com/instructions/instructions_misc_302728.htm

jp80874
07-14-2007, 06:51 AM
Thank you Kapitman. I notice in Clueless’ profile that he was last on APUG June 19th. I sent an email in hope it might reach him elsewhere.

Does anyone know what material is used to make the insert and what are the "pins" that hold the film? The material looks translucent in the link. Is it a fine mesh plastic screening, possibly window screen from a hardware store? Does the material completely fill the inner circumference of the drum? If so I am guessing the rotation and fluid hold the mesh and film against the inner wall of the drum. However, retired salesmen don’t make good engineers. Please anyone contribute if you know more.

Thanks,

John Powers

Denis P.
07-14-2007, 08:21 AM
Please anyone contribute if you know more.

Thanks,

John Powers

John,

http://www.apug.org/forums/forum43/23456-5x7-film-processing-jobo-print-drum.html

and

http://www.galerie-photo.com/porte-film-jobo.html


The first is a link to a thread where I described my experience with a DIY sheet film insert, although a bit smaller (for 5x7 negs) - but the principle is the same.

The second link is the original article (in French, but with lots of photos, so it' easy to follow) which gave me the idea.

As for the materials, the holder is made of construction-grade translucent plastic, found at the local equivalent of Home Depot - must be some window screening stuff or something, it's designated as "UV-protection" or something. But, it's not a mesh, it's solid sheet of PVC. I used hot air gun to make "dimples" to prevent the negatives sticking to the holder.
Pins I make from whatever is at hand - mostly plastic plugs, etc. Keep in mind the material has to be water-resistant - you don't want rust in there...

BTW; I also have the original JOBO sheet film holder - but it's actually not a sheet film holder - they call it "JOBO Formathalter/Format holder" and I think it was made for developing test strips. JOBO code #4206, and it's small - you could probably fit just one 5x7 neg onto it.


HTH,

Denis

Brickbird
07-14-2007, 08:34 AM
John,

http://www.apug.org/forums/forum43/23456-5x7-film-processing-jobo-print-drum.html

and

http://www.galerie-photo.com/porte-film-jobo.html


The first is a link to a thread where I described my experience with a DIY sheet film insert, although a bit smaller (for 5x7 negs) - but the principle is the same.

The second link is the original article (in French, but with lots of photos, so it' easy to follow) which gave me the idea.

As for the materials, the holder is made of construction-grade translucent plastic, found at the local equivalent of Home Depot - must be some window screening stuff or something, it's designated as "UV-protection" or something. But, it's not a mesh, it's solid sheet of PVC. I used hot air gun to make "dimples" to prevent the negatives sticking to the holder.
Pins I make from whatever is at hand - mostly plastic plugs, etc. Keep in mind the material has to be water-resistant - you don't want rust in there...

BTW; I also have the original JOBO sheet film holder - but it's actually not a sheet film holder - they call it "JOBO Formathalter/Format holder" and I think it was made for developing test strips. JOBO code #4206, and it's small - you could probably fit just one 5x7 neg onto it.


HTH,

Denis

I have the 11x14 Jobo sheet film holder. I am leaving shortly for a wedding shoot in Temple, Texas but will post specs on the material and attempt to post close-up shots of it on Sunday. The pins would seem to be the hardest item to find.

Tav Walraven

Ole
07-14-2007, 08:47 AM
I do my larger films in print drums, just as if they were prints.

I haven't yet had any need for a "Formathalter" or something like that, I just use the little thingies that are meant to hold papers in place.

On the very rare occasion when there has been a trace of anti-halation dye on the back of the sheet I let it sit in a tray with water for ten minutes. That has always fixed that particular "problem".

jp80874
07-14-2007, 11:56 AM
Thank you all. It is begining to come together. Thank you Tav for what you can add on Sunday.

John

Brickbird
07-14-2007, 08:05 PM
Thank you all. It is begining to come together. Thank you Tav for what you can add on Sunday.

John

John....I used to use the Jobo holder but started using the Cibachrome black tubes years ago for 11x14 and now 12x20. I have acquired all the sizes and about 8 base rollers that reverse agitation. I just put the film in the tube and pour in the dev. and off we go. No streaks, no fuss. The tubes are on Ebay quite often and so are the base rollers. PM me for more detailed info if you like.

Tav Walraven

jp80874
07-14-2007, 08:58 PM
Tav,
Thanks for the idea. That may be where I have to go. As mentioned above I already have the CPP-2 and am doing two sheets at a time in combined 2560 & 2830 tanks. I bought a 3063 drum (20x24 paper) with the understanding that someone else was going to provide an insert. That fell through so my first effort would be to get that working. Two at a time produce good results. I am just trying to do three sheets of 7x17 in the time it now takes to do two.

Could you tell us any more about the construction and parts of the Jobo insert? If you still have it, are interested in selling and it would work with 7x17 and a 3063 please let me know.

Thanks,

John

Don12x20
07-16-2007, 10:51 AM
Brief Description of the Jobo Inserts:

I have both 7x17 (2 per insert) and 12x20 (1 per insert) - no, they are not for sale.

The material is a clear, flexible plastic.
They are built for a specific film format and cannot be changed.

The film is held in place with black pins (same material as the base of the Jobo CPA2/CPP2 probably - molded by the Jobo people). The black pins are on top of a raised area in the clear plastic material -- obviously vacuum formed. By using these raised areas to rest the film on , and kept in place with dimples, a good bit of the chemistry is able to reach the backside (to clear the antihalation layer, etc).


When the material is curved and slides inside the drum, then the film EXACTLY fits into the region between the pins (on all four sides of the film). This holds the film off the surface on the backside (those vacuum formed raised areas are approximately 1/4 inch tall).

While it is hard to make the material lay flat -- it tends to have a natural curve to fit inside the drum -- the area that the film occupies is smaller than the region contained by the pins, by perhaps an inch or slightly more, in the curved direction.

These were custom built by the staff at Jobo USA, and ordered through Rod Klukas at Photomark in Phoenix. I am sorry to hear that they are no longer made -- they work very well for ULF development. One of the sad fates of this ULF hobby is that excellent products get made, then go out of existence pretty quickly -- I've learned to pick things up when I see them.

A friend had a similar insert built for (2x) 11x14.

The only problem I have has is that the black pins get knocked out of the plastic insert -- they are just press fit into the plastic sheet. Once the plastic sheet's hole gets enlarged, the pins no longer stay seated. At this point, a small amount of RTV (non-acetic acid emitting while curing variety) is used to hold the pins in place.

Regards
Don

jp80874
07-16-2007, 12:47 PM
Thanks Don for taking the time to describe. That explains a lot.

Were these inserts made to fit the 3063 (20x24 paper) drum? If so my objective of processing three 7x17 in one cycle may not be attainable. I am developing two sheets at a time now without an insert in the combined 2560 & 2830 tanks. Are you aware of any insert that allows three film sheets at a time in a 3063 or any other drum? My measurement of the interior of the 3063 indicates that there is room for three. I don't know how much space between the sheets if any is needed for circulation of chemicals.

Thanks for your contribution.

John

argus
08-17-2007, 02:05 AM
I just use the little thingies that are meant to hold papers in place.

Ole,

I did the same some time ago with 2 8x10 sheets in a 4xxx drum and got heavily underdeveloped areas near where the black plastic retainers were.


G