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Terence
04-25-2007, 12:28 PM
I'm currently just trying to get my arms around using my Korona 8x20, so I'm not currently up to the challenge of learning alternative processes at this time.

My question is, those of you shooting 8x20, or 7x17, etc., what do you print to when not doing an alternative process? Seems like I could cut down 16x20 print paper, but this leaves no room for a border. Same with using 20" roll paper from Ilford, etc.

I'm looking to use a fiber-based paper, would like to have at least a little border to make matting easier, but don't want to waste huge amounts of paper, for economic and environmental reasons.

Nick Zentena
04-25-2007, 12:44 PM
Would 10" roll paper work? 1" borders.

Terence
04-25-2007, 12:49 PM
The only 10" rolls I've been able to find are RC, not fiber.

Hugo Zhang
04-25-2007, 01:04 PM
Terence,

I just cut some 16x20 in half and some in 10x20. You can use the 6x20 stripes for testing.

Steve_7x
04-25-2007, 01:16 PM
... or use 20x24 paper, cut into 2 12x20 sheets and you have a 2" border top and bottom.

Scott Peters
04-25-2007, 02:05 PM
Cut down 16 x 20. The actual image size should be less than 8 x 20 anyway. The actual size on 7 x 17 is more like 6 1/2 x 16 1/2 for actual image size...

I cut down 20 x 24 for my 7 x 17's as well. Don't see why this wouldn't work for 8 x 20 too. I use MUCH smaller sizes for test contacts....to mazimize paper. Pick a small area with lots of tonal range..

jamie young
04-25-2007, 09:49 PM
I always cut 20x24 into 10x24 sheets which gave a nice borders for handling.
I made trays to fit the 10x24 paper and save sink space out of plexi.
works great.
Jamie

Peter Schrager
04-26-2007, 12:39 AM
just in recievership of a nice 8x20 camera and would like to elaborate on this thread-if no one minds. things like storage for the film;any or all hints/ advice well taken....
thanks, Peter

jamie young
04-26-2007, 07:08 AM
for 8x20 storage I get a 16x20 box and divide it in two sides. I get 16x20 acid free paper from light impressions, fold it in half, and keep the negs in there.
More on trays and stuff later.
Jamie

Dan Dozer
04-27-2007, 02:35 AM
Peter,

I'm new to 8 x 20 myself. Just today I got my order from clearbags.com - you can get film storage sleeves pretty inexpensively ($13.00 for 100 clear bags that are 8 7/16" x 20 1/4". I plan on making a storage box or two out of foam core so I can make it to just the size I want.

bobherbst
04-28-2007, 12:44 AM
On a related note, consider Hollinger boxes - http://www.genealogicalstorageproducts.com/ullafofibo1.html
for boxes sized for storing your 8x20 negatives. Purchase buffered 16x20 paper and fold in half for negative storage in the Hollinger boxes. Sliding negatives into and out of plastic/mylar sleves will create static attracting dust to your negatives. You may also find one of the other sizes of their boxes useful for storing your prints depending on what size of paper on which you choose to print.

Bob

Cliff
06-08-2007, 07:53 PM
Freestyle has 20 inch x 30 ft FB mural paper http://www.freestylephoto.biz/sc_prod.php?cat_id=503&pid=1000001665

sanking
06-09-2007, 05:25 PM
I'm currently just trying to get my arms around using my Korona 8x20, so I'm not currently up to the challenge of learning alternative processes at this time.

My question is, those of you shooting 8x20, or 7x17, etc., what do you print to when not doing an alternative process? Seems like I could cut down 16x20 print paper, but this leaves no room for a border. Same with using 20" roll paper from Ilford, etc.

I'm looking to use a fiber-based paper, would like to have at least a little border to make matting easier, but don't want to waste huge amounts of paper, for economic and environmental reasons.

Terence,

Some of the alternative processes are remarkably simple. Coating and printing with processes like cyanotype and vandyke are much less complicated than using an 8X20 camera, and they give beautiful results. The materials are also quite inexpensive. And alternative processes open a wide door of creative possibilities not available with silver papers.

Sandy King

Jim Fitzgerald
06-09-2007, 08:40 PM
Terence,

Some of the alternative processes are remarkably simple. Coating and printing with processes like cyanotype and vandyke are much less complicated than using an 8X20 camera, and they give beautiful results. The materials are also quite inexpensive. And alternative processes open a wide door of creative possibilities not available with silver papers.

Sandy King

Sandy, this gives me some ideas also. I just need to get the bellows completed and my 8x20 will be done. I was thinking about other processes. From what I've read some of them sound confusing but I must agree probably no more difficult than building an 8x20 for your first project. I was thinking about Van Dyke or Kallitype when i do make the jump to alternative. I have read your articles on Unblinking Eye and I thank you for explaning it so well. I guess you just have to do it. I would have to start by using the Sun for my UV source. I'm busy building a Walnut 11x14 now so the light box will have to wait.

Jim

sanking
06-10-2007, 12:37 AM
Sandy, this gives me some ideas also. I just need to get the bellows completed and my 8x20 will be done. I was thinking about other processes. From what I've read some of them sound confusing but I must agree probably no more difficult than building an 8x20 for your first project. I was thinking about Van Dyke or Kallitype when i do make the jump to alternative. I have read your articles on Unblinking Eye and I thank you for explaning it so well. I guess you just have to do it. I would have to start by using the Sun for my UV source. I'm busy building a Walnut 11x14 now so the light box will have to wait.

Jim


Jim,

Yes, you just have to dive in. Processes like cyanotype and vandyke are really remarkably simple so you should not have a problem.

And by all means use the sun if you don't have an artificial light source. Very inxpensive and very powerful.

Sandy

Jim Fitzgerald
06-10-2007, 10:43 AM
Sandy, thanks for the words of encouragement. I don't have a problem jumping into just about anything. I will post some results when I have them.

Jim