PDA

View Full Version : <warning> Boring BS Soft Focus Pics </warning> Spencer Portland Achromatic Meniscus!



Pages : 1 [2]

jimgalli
08-24-2007, 12:03 PM
Hi Jim and Charley...

You've found the most difficult aspect of using one of these lenses!

Where do you set the aperture? How much fuzz do you allow / want?

Different subjects require different settings and therein lies the whole problem of the choices you need to make for a successful photograph.

Alex Hollmann
09-12-2007, 08:14 PM
I hope this is not a stupid question, but here goes anyway: how do you produce those different speeds with a Packard Ideal shutter? I thought it was either B or 1/25 (sort of, if you're lucky). Or is this holding the Packard open and then using your patented shutter system (two black cards at right angles to each other)?

Mark Sawyer
09-15-2007, 03:11 PM
I hope this is not a stupid question, but here goes anyway: how do you produce those different speeds with a Packard Ideal shutter? I thought it was either B or 1/25 (sort of, if you're lucky). Or is this holding the Packard open and then using your patented shutter system (two black cards at right angles to each other)?

Butting in, I'll note that using the Packard is a bit of an art, even in the "Instant" mode. Squeezing the bulb with different presures can give results from about 1/25 to 1/8 or more, though risking shutter-stutters and hang-ups at slower speeds. An evening with a shutter-speed tester and the Packard teaches a lot, and I still make a few practice squeezes before pulling the dark slide.

One can also do multiple instant exposures, though reciprocity failure can creep in with many films.

Neutral density filters are also handy, as soft focus lenses do well in hard (meaning often bright) light, and get their effect at wide apertures. It's nice to have the option of a multiple-second exposure in sunlight on a 400 speed film wide open...

jimgalli
09-15-2007, 10:41 PM
I hope this is not a stupid question, but here goes anyway: how do you produce those different speeds with a Packard Ideal shutter? I thought it was either B or 1/25 (sort of, if you're lucky). Or is this holding the Packard open and then using your patented shutter system (two black cards at right angles to each other)?

I'll add a little to Mark's excellent answer. Most Packards have a pin that selects for instant and bulb. In bulb mode it is very responsive to negative air pressure. So you squeeze to open and release the bulb to "suck" it closed again. It's possible to get about 1/8 second doing this. Slower is simply holding the air pressure a moment longer before the bulb sucks it closed. With practice you can listen to a Nikon FM's 1/4 second and get a perfect 1/4 with the packard. Same for 1/2, 1, etc. In instant, a hard squeeze will give a very repeatable 1/25th 1/30th. An easier squeeze will give a longer exposure. I've grown so comfy with them that it's rare indeed for me to be spoiled these days with a modern shutter.

Alex Hollmann
09-15-2007, 11:36 PM
Thanks a lot, Mark and Jim! I have a Packard on a 9 inch board that came with my 360mm Heliar, and haven't got round to using it. This will help a lot when I get started. And once I order a bulb.

colrehogan
09-16-2007, 02:21 PM
Jim,
Where is the pin you mention on the Packard shutter?

freygr
09-16-2007, 07:59 PM
I'll add a little to Mark's excellent answer. Most Packards have a pin that selects for instant and bulb. In bulb mode it is very responsive to negative air pressure. So you squeeze to open and release the bulb to "suck" it closed again. It's possible to get about 1/8 second doing this. Slower is simply holding the air pressure a moment longer before the bulb sucks it closed. With practice you can listen to a Nikon FM's 1/4 second and get a perfect 1/4 with the packard. Same for 1/2, 1, etc. In instant, a hard squeeze will give a very repeatable 1/25th 1/30th. An easier squeeze will give a longer exposure. I've grown so comfy with them that it's rare indeed for me to be spoiled these days with a modern shutter.

I have a Packard with two air cylinders, one opens and closes the shutter for focusing, and the other air cylinder is the instantaneous only and no pins to select function mode. Then I have a larger one without any place to install a pin.

jimgalli
09-17-2007, 12:36 PM
Jim,
Where is the pin you mention on the Packard shutter?

Actually the pin was included in the original boxes when they were new and was mounted out in front on the wood lens board. Nowadays they are largely missing but if you are looking at the piston side of the shutter, look near the top mid-right area above the piston and hopefully you'll see a little protruding round thing. Flip the shutter over and you'll see a matching hole where a small finish nail can go in as replacement for the original pin.

There were 3 types in the old days. A #5 did not have this feature. It would only open and close with the bulb, period. A #6 is as I've described above. With the pin in the hole it is in instantaneous mode. No pin equals bulb mode. A #8 is the one with 2 pistons. One for instant and one for time, or bulb.

Does anyone know which issue of VC mag had the great article about these about 6 years ago?