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Michael Kadillak
10-23-2007, 08:34 PM
Brush develop those massive sheets one negative at a time. Absolutely beautiful results and I have never scratched a negative with a brush.Being clumsy and gouging one with a nail coming out of the wash ...yes. But never during development. When understanding brush development and what agitation means with a pyro/metol developer like WD2D... you'll see results that will put a smile on your face. Robert

Correct me if I am wrong here but WD2D when the two parts are mixed is an acidic one shot developer that can only last a very limited amount of time in the tray. How many sheets can you brush develop in one developer tray without adding more carbonate to the solution and changing the ionic chemical activity ratio? Two sheets maybe? If you have the time and willing to be that patient then good for you.

I can get two batches of six sheets of 8x20 done at one time out of a single developer mixing in a single 16x20 tray with zero scratches. I have a dedicated 8x20 sheet film washer that takes six sheets at a time so I do not have to concern myself about scratching sheet film in the wash tray.

Cheers!

RobertP
10-24-2007, 02:18 AM
I can shuffle 8 sheets of tmax all day long with good results. Efke pl 50 and 100 are a different story. The film is very easily scratched. Yes brush development takes longer but seldom do I come back from a days shoot with more than a dozen negs. No matter what film I've used I've gotten better results from brush development than I have shuffling. Yes I've learned a lot about patience since moving up to ULF. I mix my own developers so the amount used is not an issue especially at the cost of ULF sheet film. Also over the course of a days shoot I may shoot some scenes that will require different developing times than others so putting them all in one stack and shuffling them all at one developing time wouldn't give me the best results. I don't do DBI and I don't use night vision goggles. I just know my developer and film. If you think brush development is slow (8-11 min) you should talk to some of the ones using stand development...they take naps while developing film. Now I've taken patience to even another level...I started doing wet plate collodion. As they say....different strokes....

John Snyder
04-25-2008, 05:18 PM
Apologies for having sunk out of sight for so long. After being interrupted by travel, the holidays, sickness, more travel, sickness (and so on...), I showed the insert prototype to a manufacturing engineer on a recent trip to Portland. He said that just to get dies made for injection molding--the means I was proposing--could run about $100,000, and, offhand, another workable manufacturing method didn't come to mind.

It's a fairly simply item--one that would be useful to me and, apparently, others--but the dies would need to be large, hefty items that are intricate to make. I haven't given up completely, but haven't seen the way clear yet. Either I find a way to produce the insert, or find a space for a traditional darkroom. If I do find a way to manufacture this, I'll check in.

John

jonw
04-25-2008, 05:59 PM
It is just a thought John, but if it is possible to get a sufficently thick flexible plastic and then use nylon nuts, bolts, and washers strategically placed on the sheet, this could work. I recently was very fortunate to purchase an 11x14 and a 16x20 JOBO insert. If you are in Boise sometime, contact me and I will be happy to show them to you. Jon

Keith Pitman
04-28-2008, 11:56 AM
I was able to fabricate an insert for the 3063 drum for 7x17. See this link:

http://www.apug.org/forums/forum187/44903-eureka-jobo-3063-insert-7x17.html

It's a bit crude, and you have to watch (in the dark!) what you are doing when you load it, but it develops film fine.

TheFlyingCamera
04-27-2010, 07:51 PM
I was able to fabricate an insert for the 3063 drum for 7x17. See this link:

http://www.apug.org/forums/forum187/44903-eureka-jobo-3063-insert-7x17.html

It's a bit crude, and you have to watch (in the dark!) what you are doing when you load it, but it develops film fine.

I realize this is a very old thread, but what developer were you using? which side of the shelf liner did you have toward the film - the smooth or the ribbed? How have the button fixtures fared in the intervening two years?