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holmburgers
03-09-2011, 10:35 AM
Ok, edited to maintain a better level of privacy for PR. The remaining message is pretty harmless and I don't feel that it violates his privacy. If other's feel the same as Ray, please PM me and tell me so. I realize that my level of comfort with regards to online privacy probably differs from others and so it's certainly possible that some things that I don't bat an eye at would make other's skin crawl.

My thinking in posting this communication was that of a journalist; sharing the facts. Photoresearcher is self-admittedly not fond of the computer, and it occured to me that perhaps I had a "rare document" that would be of interest to anyone awaiting word on his project. By including his name (removed now) I thought in some naive way that maybe it was only fair; to give the credit to an actual person and not just an online persona.

Ray, I definitely see your point and concede to a degree, but in life and online, I'd rather push someone's comfort zone for the greater good than shy away for fear of the potential and thus leave nothing for nobody.

Ray Rogers
03-09-2011, 12:01 PM
Ray, I definitely see your point and concede to a degree, but in life and online, I'd rather push someone's comfort zone for the greater good than shy away for fear of the potential and thus leave nothing for nobody.

I think you did the right thing.

There certainly is a grey area when one is given information
yet not specifically instructed NOT to allow it to be passed on.

I am actively documenting this stuff myself,
so I run into the problem all the time...
but strangely, some people inexplicatively fall down when pushed!

Maybe he doesn't mind a bit and will ask you to be his "electronic interface" afterall.
:)

holmburgers
03-09-2011, 12:05 PM
Thanks Ray, let's hope so!

MrBaz
06-21-2011, 11:00 PM
Very interested in this thread. Subbed.

Jeff Kubach
06-21-2011, 11:41 PM
Very Impressive!

Jeff

MrBaz
06-24-2011, 11:53 PM
Any updates?

spacer
06-25-2011, 09:44 AM
Getting kodachrome back would be sweet, even if under another name...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZpaNJqF4po

Photo Engineer
06-25-2011, 12:45 PM
It is very difficult to replicate the Kodachrome film emulsions and coatings. It is just as difficult to replicate the process!

I seriously doubt if we will see anything but high quality B&W films from this effort.

PE

holmburgers
07-27-2011, 03:25 PM
I've been corresponding with photo researcher a bit lately and it sounds like he's making good progress. Very interesting stuff!

I've encouraged him to post some images, so fingers crossed.

EdoNork
01-30-2012, 10:20 AM
Is it finished yet? :)

holmburgers
01-30-2012, 11:01 AM
Not finished, but going well. PR is working very hard on it, and I've been in touch with him recently. I'm afraid all will have to wait a bit longer though...

paul ron
01-31-2012, 07:57 AM
Very impressive. I hope this inspires small fsctory film manufacturing, like micro breweries, to start popping up all over the place as the big boys take a nose dive.

Thanks for the tour.

holmburgers
02-22-2012, 02:08 PM
Seemed like the appropriate place to post this...

This Laboratory Drawdown Coater looks awesome -> http://www.chemsultants.com/testing-equipment-products/sample-preparation-devices/laboratory-drawdown-coater.aspx

Steve Smith
02-22-2012, 03:19 PM
Awesome indeed... and quite a simple thing to make.


Steve.

michaelbsc
02-22-2012, 03:33 PM
Seemed like the appropriate place to post this...

This Laboratory Drawdown Coater looks awesome -> http://www.chemsultants.com/testing-equipment-products/sample-preparation-devices/laboratory-drawdown-coater.aspx

Well, the difference between this and the ones I've seen is that all I have ever seen spray the fluid up and coat from the bottom, not the top.

I suspect that a top fed coater would have an issue that as the feed hopper fill height varied then the coating thickness would vary. But maybe not, or at least maybe not within a close enough range.

I do think you could modify this thing to keep it continuously fed with coating material, but you would have to have some way to dry the coating before rolling it up. That's going to take a bit of floor space in a dark area. And with no way to inspect your product before slitting your emulsion defects will be pretty hit or miss.

But what the hell, some film is better than no film, right?

MB

Photo Engineer
02-22-2012, 04:55 PM
This is very similar to Jim Browning's coater and also to my coating blade. It uses a doctor blade to surface the coating layer and adjust the thickness. Excess is collected and recycled.

PE

michaelbsc
02-23-2012, 03:05 PM
Awesome indeed... and quite a simple thing to make.


Steve.

And probably cheaper than to purchase. The quote from them came in at 6500.00 USD, but you must consider that this is new, with warranty, and expecting to be serviced, and prepared to offer support to an industrial customer instead of a hobby market.

All in all, it probably isn't too outrageous for an industrial customer that wants a coater that "just works out of the box" and doesn't want to fool with it. But it is a bit steep for a guy in a hobby market. I certainly have paid more than that for industrial equipment that "just works" although not quite something as simple as this looks.

But I'll bet something turns up on fleaBay once in a whole lots cheaper.

Discoman
02-25-2012, 02:30 PM
Well, the difference between this and the ones I've seen is that all I have ever seen spray the fluid up and coat from the bottom, not the top.

I suspect that a top fed coater would have an issue that as the feed hopper fill height varied then the coating thickness would vary. But maybe not, or at least maybe not within a close enough range.

I do think you could modify this thing to keep it continuously fed with coating material, but you would have to have some way to dry the coating before rolling it up. That's going to take a bit of floor space in a dark area. And with no way to inspect your product before slitting your emulsion defects will be pretty hit or miss.

But what the hell, some film is better than no film, right?

MB

Don't these kinds of machines use rollers to get the coating thickness desired, then used a sized blade to cut the coating from the roller and drop it onto the film/paper/whatever?
I had a PDF of a really old book that had some detailed drawings of glass plate coating machines that worked like that.

Photo Engineer
02-25-2012, 03:50 PM
That is probably correct, that a roller and doctor blade (name of the blade) is used, but it may just use a dip and blade or a cascade and blade. There are a multitude of methods out there. They all work in one way or another.

The coating blades that I have sold are like that and we used a variety of similar methods at EK.

PE

Prof_Pixel
02-26-2012, 05:42 PM
In browsing around the Kodak website I ran across the following for the Small Scale Slide Hopper Coater: http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jhtml?pq-path=14809/14845/2301126&pq-locale=en_US

Note that several other coating machines can also be found by following links from that page.