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Emulsion
12-24-2007, 01:59 AM
PE,

I'm very interested in learning more. Count me in.

Emulsion.

richard ide
12-25-2007, 01:58 AM
PE
I second the comments about valuable resource and am thoroughly interested.

Regards

Curt
12-25-2007, 02:19 AM
I'm interested only if you can tell me what a "tit" is in an X-omat processor.

Curt

Curt
12-27-2007, 12:49 AM
I got it straight from a Kodak instructor in a Kodak class.

Photo Engineer
12-27-2007, 10:02 AM
I got it straight from a Kodak instructor in a Kodak class.

I have no idea. Why didn't you ask him?

:D

PE

Kino
12-27-2007, 11:14 AM
Oh, yes, please!

I will also offer this: I would be happy to collaborate with you on a few 2D and 3D animation clips that might be needed to communicate a particular concept in your lectures. I also have non-linear editing and post production tools for video up to 2K resolution.

Let me know how I can help/contribute.

Frank

Photo Engineer
12-27-2007, 11:52 AM
Thanks Frank.

PE

Photo Engineer
12-29-2007, 01:40 PM
We have here now about 20 responses out of 20,000+ members. The thread on system engineering would take considerable work (but being in progress in part for the book anyhow). But, with only a 0.1 % response, this is similar to the disinterest shown on PN. I appreciate the enthusiasm of those who responded but I wonder about the viability of such a thread or sub forum.

I want to remind all, that in my own words elsewhere, you can throw a log across a stream to get to the other side, but that does not mean that you are an engineer. What I intend to offer is the difference between those two positions. Books like Wall and Baker offer no clue as to the science of photo systems. They were throwing logs back then.

PE

Removed Account
12-29-2007, 02:03 PM
Make that 21, Ron! I'm definitely interested in reading, even if practical work is beyond my means at the moment. Do you think my housemates would get upset if I accidentally left some silver nitrate in the bathtub? :D

- Justin

Gigabitfilm
12-29-2007, 02:21 PM
One question: tutorials on photo system design - does them include new methods for detecting the colour in a pan bw-film?

rmazzullo
12-29-2007, 02:33 PM
We have here now about 20 responses out of 20,000+ members. The thread on system engineering would take considerable work (but being in progress in part for the book anyhow). But, with only a 0.1 % response, this is similar to the disinterest shown on PN. I appreciate the enthusiasm of those who responded but I wonder about the viability of such a thread or sub forum.

I want to remind all, that in my own words elsewhere, you can throw a log across a stream to get to the other side, but that does not mean that you are an engineer. What I intend to offer is the difference between those two positions. Books like Wall and Baker offer no clue as to the science of photo systems. They were throwing logs back then.

PE

I'd be willing to bet that if more people knew about the proposed tutorials, they would respond positively. Also, there are probably many more who lurk and are interested, but choose not to respond for one reason or another.

If there was a way for Sean to put up some sort of notice at the home page of APUG informing users about the tutorials, you might get a better idea about the interest level.

Besides, the announcement was made at the height of the holiday season, so maybe there were coincidentally less folks checking in to the forum / threads.

Bob M.

Photo Engineer
12-29-2007, 03:51 PM
Bob;

I'm willing to wait. That is one reason for the post, to raise it back into view. See the number of 'holiday hits' for other threads though. Then compare it to this thread.

The point is that someone wanting to build a coating machine or make an emulsion will need the information I plan on raising. So, it is useless to think you can do something "throwing a log across a stream" when you cannot "build a bridge". See the hits on the coating machine thread. Lots of interest. I wish I could build one but it takes $$$ which I don't have to spend. I'm very happy someone was able to build it and show it. But without more information it will be a useless stand alone experiment.

I would say that if you were to build an exact replica of that machine, you would not be able to coat anything worth-while without lots of experimentation or someone like the original builder to impart that knowledge.

My goal is to start imparting that type of knowledge and also to hopefully get this individual to share his with us as well as get others invovled in a dialog. Otherwise it will be lost forever.

PE

Tom Kershaw
12-29-2007, 10:11 PM
Ron,

I think what you are doing is really very important and goes beyond the issues of current materials availability.

Thanks very much,

Tom

snowblind
01-22-2008, 02:43 PM
Yes please!! Remember, if all 20,000 members were to respond, this thread alone would crash the server and all of our browsers... Knowledge like this needs to be passed on while it still can.

snowblind
01-22-2008, 02:44 PM
Also the title of the thread doesn't exactly convey the importance of it's content. Doesn't jump out like "Film Coating Machine" does. Maybe a change (if allowed) would attract more attention?

Jerevan
01-22-2008, 05:25 PM
Just wanted to say that I'm interested, as always. Your work is very welcome. In five years' time it may prove even more valuable than it already is.

Dan Henderson
01-23-2008, 07:00 AM
Ron: I always click on and usually read your posts here. Having people like you here is one of the great strengths of this site. I think your idea is certainly worth pursuing. Perhaps do a test article to see how well it is read and then decide if it is worth the work you have to put into it.
Dan Henderson

BobNewYork
01-23-2008, 08:20 AM
I would really welcome this. I'm new to APUG but it's clear to me that you possess a wealth of knowledge in this area from which all of us could benefit. I'm neither an engineer nor a chemist but what has become clear to me over the years is that the quest for a particular photographic quality in materials involves trade-offs. (Simple example would be a fine grained, high acutance developer) I would be interested in the 'Whys' of this.

It also seems to me that further significant research on film-based photography will come not from industry but from groups of enthusiasts. Individuals who have the knowledge and interest in pursuing research will need the assistance of groups of this nature for testing, feedback etc.

Go for it and good luck!

Bob

Sirius Glass
01-23-2008, 01:03 PM
PE,

I am interested.

Steve

Justus
01-23-2008, 09:40 PM
Ron,

I am interested.

justus