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el wacho
05-23-2008, 10:03 AM
who is into abstract works - in particular b/w?


i'll start the ball rolling with Aaron Siskind. his work really spoke to me about what was possible with a camera....


i hope with this thread to be introduced to photographer's works that i've yet to see.


:)

rcoda
05-23-2008, 10:39 AM
I love abstracts... see my website.

For the famous photographers, look at Edward and Brett Weston, Oliver Gagliani and Minor White to start with. Also a personal friend of mine, Randy Efros (www.randyefros.com), who was Brett Weston's last assistant.

Inayat Noor
05-23-2008, 10:44 AM
Nick Johnson was one of my teachers at The New England School of Photograhy. While I was there he did a lot with concrete forms he mixed and created.

http://www.nickjohnsonphotography.com/

jnanian
05-23-2008, 11:56 AM
i really enjoy abstract imagery as well.
they allow the viewer to connect
at several different levels that some "straight" photographs don't or can't.
the line, form and texture but also at a subconscious and more personal level.
some abstractions allow the viewer to dream while s/he
are awake ... we all need to dream a little bit when we are awake

JosephineIsJosephine
05-23-2008, 03:44 PM
I have to admit (as a newbie) this is the first time I knowingly encounter abstract photography. Nick Johnson's pictures do rock. And Richard, I like some of your pictures.

Thanks for the inspiration! I think, carrying around my camera I encountered some things that would have been perfect for an abstract picture, but I was looking for a classic composition with subject und background and missed the opportunity to take a good abstract pic.

Tim Boehm
05-24-2008, 12:28 AM
Brett Weston

One of my favorites is Broken Glass, 1954, see it here:
http://www.brettwestonarchive.com/Images/ten

Abstract Portfolio #1:
http://www.brettwestonarchive.com/images/ABPI

Abstract Portfilio #2:
http://www.brettwestonarchive.com/images/ABPII

Les McLean
05-24-2008, 05:03 AM
David Williams a Scottish photographer currently working in colour but in B&W with his first major work "Is:Ecstacies I - XXII"

http://www.davidwilliamsphotographer.com/show.php?caseA=1&caseB=95

This is some of his colour work

http://www.davidwilliamsphotographer.com/show.php?caseA=1&caseB=93

http://www.davidwilliamsphotographer.com/show.php?caseA=1&caseB=92

c6h6o3
05-24-2008, 01:31 PM
"All good art is abstract in its structure."

--Paul Strand

Shinnya
06-03-2008, 03:58 PM
I understand exactly the same way as this quote.

Personally, I feel funny when people single out "abstract" as a category of photography. Also, when people talk about it, it seems to be always the details of some objects.

To me there is a spectrum between representation and abstraction which is applicable to any type of photography.

Isn't precisely this tension between representation and abstraction that we are supposed to enjoy in photography?

Warmly,
Tsuyoshi


"All good art is abstract in its structure."

--Paul Strand

TheFlyingCamera
06-03-2008, 04:09 PM
Even when a photograph is representational, it is still an abstract, in the sense that it is a removal from context of a specific visual slice of the subject and its environment. I think the only photographs that come close to escaping abstraction are casual snapshots, because they are lacking in intention. They are purely informational, and do not wish to convey artistic meaning. To take a photograph that has artistic meaning requires abstraction.

Merg Ross
06-21-2008, 06:29 PM
Depending on the definition, much of my work falls into this category. I also agree with the selection of Aaron Siskind and Brett Weston as being representative of abstract b&w photography.

http://mergross.com

mabman
06-23-2008, 09:22 PM
I thought of this topic immediately this past weekend - we had a photography expo, and some local photographers showed and sold their work. One woman whose name I now forget had some fascinating stuff - colour photos of various flowers shot *through* a variety of solid pieces of stained glass (which she also made). Some of them were obviously flowers, but with odd colourations, and some ended up just seemingly random, well, abstractions of something.

Very interesting work, although I don't think it sold well from the look of her booth.

Ole
06-24-2008, 03:27 AM
Abstract photography was almost "mainstream" in much of Europe at one time - have a look at Frantisek Drtikol.

rcoda
01-01-2009, 08:34 PM
To resurrect this topic...

I am the proud owner of Brett's Bank of America 1975 and his Abstraction 1954. I continue to seek out the "extraordinary in the ordinary".

I made this image this summer at the local library...

http://members.cox.net/rcoda/MustangLibrary.jpg

Abstract photography is everywhere... you just have to see it.

Bluesky1
05-04-2014, 05:20 PM
I have not been formerly taught about abstract photography, but I have tried to experiment a few times with it, and I was really amazed with the results.

It is something I would strongly recommend it. At least try it!

cliveh
05-04-2014, 05:30 PM
Even when a photograph is representational, it is still an abstract, in the sense that it is a removal from context of a specific visual slice of the subject and its environment. I think the only photographs that come close to escaping abstraction are casual snapshots, because they are lacking in intention. They are purely informational, and do not wish to convey artistic meaning. To take a photograph that has artistic meaning requires abstraction.

How true and well said.