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View Full Version : LARGEST PHOTOGRAPH IN WORLD IS TAKEN IN TONOPAH BY CAMERA MANUFACTURED IN THIS CAMP



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Barry S
07-28-2008, 09:08 AM
Barry:

Isn't this the camera that was hauled around via flatcar to take a photo of a train?

Yes, it was commissioned by the Chicago and Alton Railway to promote a new train. The camera was built in Chicago and the photographer was George R. Lawrence--a very interesting guy. The size of the plate was 8 x 4 1/2 feet.

WarEaglemtn
07-28-2008, 09:08 AM
Sounds really great. I need a print to go in the living room. Can he get matting and a frame to match the pattern in my couch?

Seriously, sounds like a labor of love.

How does he mount and display this size image?

bobwysiwyg
07-28-2008, 10:41 AM
Interesting indeed. Thanks for the mentioning of his name.

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/panoramic_photo/pnphtgs.html

panoramic
07-28-2008, 10:58 AM
Here's another business card from my collection.

And you might like my website about the George Lawrence San Francisco project.

www.RonKleinPhotos.com

Ron in Alaska

Marco B
07-28-2008, 11:19 AM
Yes, it was commissioned by the Chicago and Alton Railway to promote a new train. The camera was built in Chicago and the photographer was George R. Lawrence--a very interesting guy. The size of the plate was 8 x 4 1/2 feet.

This about the size of the camera I saw in the photo museum in Antwerp. Maybe a bit smaller, but not much looking at the photograph you posted... an incredible machine. The camera was part of the AGFA-GEVAERT camera collection (Agfa Photo-Historama), which was divided into the cameras going to Antwerp, while the photographs of that collection ended up in Keulen.

Thomas Bertilsson
07-28-2008, 11:31 AM
I have read the rest of the thread and know about 1913, but here's a link to the new record anyway:

http://www.freestylephoto.biz/greatpicture.php

Just because it's interesting how they achieved it.


I thought the largest photograph in the world was much larger, something like 100 feet by 30 feet, and was taken in an aircraft hanger in southern California. The hanger was used as a camera oscura, and the image projected onto light sensitive cloth. I believe the hanger was later torn down, so the photo Jim is referring to may be the world's largest photo made by a non-disposable camera.

Don Wallace
07-28-2008, 12:13 PM
Not to muddy the waters more, but are you thinking of the swimming pool in Dawson City? Because that was movie film from the teens and twenties. I think...

That was a different discovery. I copied the text below from the Library of Congress.

This collection of early theatrical films, known more familiarly as the Dawson Collection, is most notable for its source: a Yukon swimming pool. During the summer of 1978, amid restoration of Dawson City (a gold rush era boom town in the Yukon Territory) workmen unearthed a cache of 35mm nitrate film. At the end of the distribution chain, some 500 reels had accumulated there, and in 1929 were dumped as fill in a swimming pool that had come to the end of its usefulness. The region's deep and abiding cold (still today the only known retardant of nitrate deterioration) contributed to a high survival rate of the buried treasure, although water damage took its toll, especially from the top layer. Quick, improvised action on the part of the Public Archives of Canada (now National Archives of Canada, Moving Image and Sound Archives), with the cooperation of the Library of Congress and the American Film Institute, was necessary in order to salvage the survivors. See Sam Kula's "There's Film in Them Thar Hills!" (American Film, July/August 1979) for an action- packed account of the discovery and rescue. LC has the U.S. productions, some 190 reels, and all have been preserved and cataloged.

Although a number of important, and rare, early films (including "Polly of the Circus" [1917], with Mae Marsh and "Bliss" [1917], with Harold Lloyd) were unearthed in Dawson City, many survive only as incomplete copies. There are features, shorts, several serials and some news films. Title cards are filed in the Film and Television Catalog, and copies of these cards have been collected for a subject file in the Reading Room.

Don12x20
07-28-2008, 03:22 PM
Looks like at least four very interesting (nonfiction) stories in this thread. Any pointers to additional information not listed would be most useful.
* the 22 inch Circuit Camera
* the San Francisco Kite adventure
* the Alton Railroad Photograph (this has been published in hardcover in at least one train book I've seen)
* the Dawson swimming pool find
(+ the Hanger in S California was well documented in several media types)

DougGrosjean
07-28-2008, 03:47 PM
I can verify that Google has a bunch of stuff on everything except the 22" Cirkut camera.

It might have stuff on that too, but I haven't looked for anything on that particular story.

Barry S
07-28-2008, 04:00 PM
Here's another business card from my collection.

And you might like my website about the George Lawrence San Francisco project.

www.RonKleinPhotos.com

Ron in Alaska

You sir, are also an interesting guy. That's quite an adventure re-photographing the Lawrence SF kite photograph. If you decide to reconstruct the great camera, consider my help at your disposal. :)

Tony Egan
07-29-2008, 05:09 AM
......
One of the views has been purchased by H H Bacon and is now attracting attention at his place of business. It was inspected by a large number of people yesterday and declared to be a work of art......
.

So the formula for "is photography art" was possessed by the good people of Tonopah back in 1913. Is that still lying around somewhere?!

Vaughn
08-01-2008, 12:57 AM
So the formula for "is photography art" was possessed by the good people of Tonopah back in 1913. Is that still lying around somewhere?!

Sorry, Tony...that mine on the out-skirts of Tonopah played out in the early 1920's...in fact, it is highly suspected that a collector from New Jersey might have actually seeded the mine with art. Shares in the mine were sold up and down the East Coast before it was discovered that there really is no art in Nevada.

Vaughn