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Kirk Keyes
10-14-2008, 11:09 AM
Has anyone heard of these books? -
Mitteilungen Aus Den Forschungslaboratorien Der Agfa, Volumes I-IV

I just bought a set. I know it's in German, so I guess I better study up. And does anyone know of a good German to English photographic dictionary?

Kirk

dwross
10-14-2008, 11:28 AM
Hi Kirk,
Cool! What is the copyright date on the set? I've been working through Eder with the help of "German-English Science Dictionary" by Louis De Vries, 1959, and "Heath's German Dictionary" by Elizabeth Weir, 1888. Between them, they seem to cover the bases.

I imagine you'll get some good advice from the German emulsioneers here.

Denise

AgX
10-14-2008, 01:21 PM
Kirk,

A decent photographic De/En dictionary is "Fachwörterbuch Optik, Foto, Video" by Günther Richter.
(on surplus over here right now)
But it won't be of much help concerning photochemical topics.

Kirk Keyes
10-14-2008, 02:38 PM
Denise - oldest volume is from about 1954 and then the others came out every two years or so. At least it will not be printed in the old deutsche Schrift - Fraktur I think it's called. I'm Ok with Eszetts, but the rest I find hard to read...

Photo Engineer
10-14-2008, 03:14 PM
Kirk;

I can help to some extent. Let me know where / if you get hung up. I have several dictionaries here, but overcoat in German translates into "basting sauce (as in roast)" with one dictionary, so it is not helpful unless I know the context. Of course, you usually don't use a basting sauce in emulsion making and coatinig. :D

PE

Struan Gray
10-15-2008, 02:36 AM
I find these two useful. Both have more technical terms than the common printed dictionaries.

http://dict.tu-chemnitz.de/

http://dict.leo.org/

AgX
10-15-2008, 04:07 AM
Kirk,

The most recent one, and seemingly covering the whole imaging field is:


Mühle: Wörterbuch der Bildtechnik - Dictionary of Imaging
Oscar Brandstetter Verlag


I have not held in my hands, but it's already on my wishlist.

But concerning that Agfa publication, you better take that offer by PE.

Uhner
10-15-2008, 04:15 AM
I find these two useful. Both have more technical terms than the common printed dictionaries.

http://dict.tu-chemnitz.de/

http://dict.leo.org/

I second that recommendation.

Just bear in mind that the German language has compound words and that you hence may have to search using headwords.

Photo Engineer
10-15-2008, 08:06 AM
I suggest that you all read "That Awful German Language" by Mark Twain. I hope I got that title right. I read it in College while taking German and had a very good laugh over compound words and split verbs.

One example that I remember approximately "she de from the train station parted". It was done as a practical joke by the author translating German literally into English and then making side comments.

PE

Struan Gray
10-15-2008, 08:21 AM
"Whenever the literary German dives into a sentence, that is the last you are going to see of him till he emerges on the other side of his Atlantic with his verb in his mouth."

From - I think - A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court.

The academic version of this is that German theses always come in two volumes. The second contains the verbs.

Photo Engineer
10-15-2008, 08:35 AM
Japanese is much the same in that respect. The verbs are at the end of the sentence.

PE

Marco B
10-15-2008, 08:47 AM
I second that recommendation.

Just bear in mind that the German language has compound words and that you hence may have to search using headwords.

This is a very common feature of Dutch as well, we can combine almost any combination of words, while still being valid Dutch, but bear in mind that the individual words a compound word is made up of, does NOT necessarily equate to the meaning of the compound...:o

For example in Dutch you can say "moederskindje" ("moeder" is mother in English, "kind" is child), as to mean a grown up or adolescent that is still being pampered by his mother, which is as you can see a completely different meaning than the individual "headwords"!

Lee L
10-15-2008, 08:59 AM
For example in Dutch you can say "moederskindje" ("moeder" is mother in English, "kind" is child), as to mean a grown up or adolescent that is still being pampered by his mother, which is as you can see a completely different meaning than the individual "headwords"!

Virtually identical to the English version with the same meaning, "mommy's boy".

Lee

Uhner
10-15-2008, 09:13 AM
This is a very common feature of Dutch as well, we can combine almost any combination of words

Yes, this is also a feature of the Scandinavian languages as well. But, given the increased use of English in everyday culture, education and the workplace, several people seems to have lost the ability to write compound words as one word. This is a problem at least in Sweden, I’m not sure of the situation in Denmark and Norway.

wildbillbugman
10-15-2008, 10:31 PM
[QUOTE=Uhner;694528]I second that recommendation.

"Just bear in mind that the German language has compound words "

I am so old that I can remember when American English actualy used compound words! Now even multi-sylible words are rare. I don't know about British English, but here anything that cannot be well represented by a stick drawing is beyond the kin of the "Publicly Educated".
Yes, I am just a "bitter old furt".
Bill

Kirk Keyes
10-15-2008, 10:57 PM
Yes, I am just a "bitter old furt".

Bill - you must have been publicly educated. Everyone knows you spell fart with an "a". It's one of the oldest words in the English language. Even back to Middle English, where it occurs in Chaucer's "Miller's Tale", one of the Canterbury Tales. ;^)

Kirk

keithwms
10-15-2008, 10:59 PM
Let me suggest that you try a real German dictionary. That eliminates the odd translation problem entirely. My favourite has been the Wahrig; I usually found it more useful than the Duden. You might need a more technical one but in any case, a good Deutsches Woerterbuch is less likely to steer you in the wrong direction than a German-English one.

Anyway, scientific German is quite easy for English speakers. Literature, now sometimes that can be just about untranslatable.

AgX
10-16-2008, 02:11 AM
But with all that whe should not forget that part of our problems are house-made.
To stay at the topic: in our world we know three different meanings of `grain´...

In German we more often differerentiate between `Kristall´ and `Korn´, but still this only slightly reduces the ambiguity.

Uhner
10-16-2008, 03:39 AM
But with all that whe should not forget that part of our problems are house-made.
To stay at the topic: in our world we know three different meanings of `grain´...

In German we more often differerentiate between `Kristall´ and `Korn´, but still this only slightly reduces the ambiguity.

:D

AgX
10-16-2008, 05:31 AM
Yes, in three lines I at least make two typing errors, and still overlook one after correcting the other...