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BetterSense
03-03-2009, 12:19 PM
Apparently this film was pre-safety film? I'm surprised no mention was made of the flamability of the film stock or precautions for fire safety.

Kirk Keyes
03-03-2009, 01:34 PM
Post safety film. Cellulose can be converted into cellulose triacetate and that (along with other variations of cellulose esters) was often used as safety film. As you mention in the other thread, other polyesters can be used as well.

BetterSense
03-03-2009, 05:15 PM
Oh. I remembered the video mentioning nitric acid during the emulsion-making part, so I assumed it was the old nitrocellulose film.

Toffle
03-03-2009, 05:54 PM
I have watched this a few times since the first buzz a month or so ago. Very informative and entertaining... but it is the sound that has been echoing in my mind these last few weeks. After thinking about it, (or rather, clearing my mind and letting the associations create themselves) I am almost certain that the musical soundtrack may have been composed by Raymond Leppard, the British conductor and film composer. Of course, it could just be a product of its time, but the music is very similar to his soundtrack for Lord of the Flies, from the same era.

... just a little bit of trivia of absolutely no consequence...

By the way, I met Mr. Leppard in the late '70s while studying for my music degree in Windsor, ON. Charming fellow (who cussed like a trucker... :D )

Cheers,

John Shriver
03-03-2009, 07:09 PM
So far as I can tell from my inventory, the beveling/feathering of the edges of the backing paper continued until the switch to a plastic backed backing paper. It was certainly still so treated when 120 switched to plastic spools in the 1970's. (The other roll film sizes used metal spools to the end.)

From the patent, I think that the paper was "distressed" before it was cut. Pretty much just run it over a flange that stretches it, and puts a dent in the paper. Then cut down the middle of the dent.

Ray Rogers
03-03-2009, 08:45 PM
I have watched this a few times since the first buzz a month or so ago. Very informative and entertaining... but it is the sound that has been echoing in my mind these last few weeks. After thinking about it, (or rather, clearing my mind and letting the associations create themselves) I am almost certain that the musical soundtrack may have been composed by Raymond Leppard, the British conductor and film composer. Of course, it could just be a product of its time, but the music is very similar to his soundtrack for Lord of the Flies, from the same era.


Interesting...
I was doing something a few days ago, my mind is jumping now and I can't focus clearly but I thought I heard part of the music in a movie or commercial... I thought about documenting it but was tired and thought "Why?" "Who cares?"
Maybe I was wrong.
Now I wish I would have looked into it a bit more...
the music is quite distinctive!

Is there a way to hear some of that soundtrack?

Ray

Marco B
03-04-2009, 02:51 AM
Here maybe? Well, it's the official trailer at least, but it doesn't feature much music. Much more hits for Lord of the Flies on YouTube if you search for it using that title... Unfortunately, many fragments don't seem to use original sound and music, but there might be something.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehuMZjyA6z8&feature=related

Marco

Marco B
03-04-2009, 04:38 AM
Oh. I remembered the video mentioning nitric acid during the emulsion-making part, so I assumed it was the old nitrocellulose film.

Nitric acid was only mentioned in conjunction with the dissolving of silver bars to form silvernitrate, not in conjunction with the film base.

Toffle
03-04-2009, 06:42 AM
Here maybe? Well, it's the official trailer at least, but it doesn't feature much music. Much more hits for Lord of the Flies on YouTube if you search for it using that title... Unfortunately, many fragments don't seem to use original sound and music, but there might be something.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehuMZjyA6z8&feature=related

Marco

I used to have this film on VHS when I taught senior English to unsuspecting teenagers. :D I probably left it in the English department video library. (I never had much success with that book in the classroom) You might find it at your local video rental... but get the 1963 black and white version, not the horrendous remake) In the original film, director Peter Brook used a paperback copy of the novel as a shooting script, and interspersed "reality" footage of the kids interacting. The film seems artless, but is quite effective.

Cheers,

Prest_400
03-04-2009, 11:03 AM
Nice to see how Kodak made film those years.
"hundreds of films are packaged every minute" now, I guess none of the manufacturer makes that much quantity.
Also, they used 14T of silver a week, that would cost a lot today.

AgX
02-02-2013, 01:35 PM
Here is the first part of this film in its original English version:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u3dtm9IjQAA&feature=player_detailpage

dwross
02-06-2013, 11:18 AM
Excellent! What fun. Thank you for posting the link.

Photo Engineer
02-06-2013, 02:15 PM
I played it and only got 7' out of about 70'. When it ran the 7' it gave me an option of part2, but that part is in Dutch again.

Oh, and the order of the scenes seems to have changed, with some additions to the English part.

PE

AgX
02-07-2013, 03:49 AM
I only found that first part, and have no idea where to find the other part(s). I did not check thoroughly contentwise.
Thank you PE for hinting at those additions!