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clayne
03-16-2009, 06:56 AM
If you have to ask...

Anyways, short and simple: 35mm / 135 film.

Jeff Kubach
03-16-2009, 07:26 AM
In my limited experience in street photograpy, I found that my Rollei TLR was the best for me.

Jeff

oldnick
03-16-2009, 08:22 AM
Anyone have used old Hasselblads in streets or are they too "look my pro camera" type of cameras?

Anton Lukoszevieze
03-16-2009, 08:28 AM
Pinhole, no-one ever notices you sitting there with a small wooden box next to you. :)

Tom Stanworth
03-17-2009, 08:32 AM
35mm is the out and out winner for street work IMHO. Technically less perfect than bigger formats but tonnes more good shots grabbed because it is smaller, faster, has more DOF, fewer film changes etc.

35mm can be effectively grain free at 20x16. Try any modern 100 speed film (Delta 100, Tmax 100, Acros etc) in dilute Xtol. D100 is great with xtol 1+1 and you will find grain only on inspection. Who cares though? I love some crisp grain with my street work and prefer films with more grain and grit.

clayne
03-17-2009, 10:10 PM
Yep grain is life. A good portion of the grain-whiners have already gone digital anyways.

glockman99
03-20-2009, 04:22 PM
For my street-shooting I use one of my Nikon F3HP cameras, (with MD-4 motordrive). I generally use my Nikkor ED 180mm lens when I want to be "sneeky", or my Nikkor 35mm f/2.8 lens when I want to include the surroundings. My "walk-about" lens is a very nice Tokina AT-X 28-85mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. Sometimes I even plug my waist-level finder onto my F3, and pretend to be just "foolin'-around" with my camera, in-order to get people's "guard" down.

TheFlyingCamera
03-21-2009, 08:52 AM
Anyone have used old Hasselblads in streets or are they too "look my pro camera" type of cameras?

Actually, it's not so much the look of the camera as it is the "Ka-THWUNK" of the mirror and body doors popping open and closed on the Hassy that kills it for street photography. You may get your first shot if nobody is aware of you, but you'll not get a second.

I was amazed at the rangefinder phenomenon - how people really do seem to ignore rangefinders but get all freaked about SLRs. I haven't really tried my Rolleiflex TLR for that kind of work yet, so I can't say how much better it would be than a 35mm rangefinder, but I've expanded my Contax G system inventory for travel, I like it so much, and that's coming from someone who thinks of a 4x5 as a point-n-shoot.

Taslim Abdani
03-26-2009, 09:15 AM
For me, the absolute best camera for street photography is the Konica Hexar AF. It is no bigger than a Leica and it is about as quiet. In "Stealth mode." it is even quieter. It is very fast with a 35mm f2 lens that rivals the best lenses ever made. My street photography has become more "street" using this camera.

pesphoto
03-26-2009, 09:26 AM
Honestly, The Yashica GSN is a great street shooter. 40mm lens and F1.7 The "Poor man's" Hexar..........:)

Blacknoise
10-28-2009, 08:37 PM
I quite like using the rolleiflex, just because the WLF means that most people done even realise im taking a photo, and the shutter is almost silent too. But I mostly use my Leica IIIf, I don't know if its the HCB vibe, but it just works for me...

Colin Corneau
10-28-2009, 09:24 PM
I did quite a lot of what would be called "street" photography overseas with my Bronica SQ-Ai...with a 45-degree prism finder it worked beautifully. Repeating oneself by saying "what works for you" but it's true.

FWIW I've found the TMax films used with TMax developer gave (seemingly) non-existent grain if that's the criteria. If you're using 35mm film it's a fine choice for that.

Katier
10-30-2009, 01:13 PM
In my limited experience in street photograpy, I found that my Rollei TLR was the best for me.

Jeff

Same here, I use a Yashicamat LM and it's easier, quicker and simpler to use than any other camera I've used.

When doing street I preset the exposure to allow a depth of field in the range I expect. Something around 2-10m or there abouts. I then pre-focus to (in this example ) about 5m and remember the lightmeter reading from when I setup the camera.

I then just adjust the shutter speed if the light changes dramatically ( which it rarely does ) and the large WLF allows quick and simple composition. Much easier than 35mm.

Karl K
10-30-2009, 06:28 PM
Have you ever tried a Yashica T4 or T4 Super (T5)? They are point 'n shoot 35mm cameras with spectacular wide angle Zeiss T* lenses. Autofocus, autoexposure, auto film advance, and built-in/fill-in flash. Great for street shooting.

Katier
10-30-2009, 06:45 PM
Have you ever tried a Yashica T4 or T4 Super (T5)? They are point 'n shoot 35mm cameras with spectacular wide angle Zeiss T* lenses. Autofocus, autoexposure, auto film advance, and built-in/fill-in flash. Great for street shooting.

Personally Not sure it would be a good option. The main reasons are two fold.

1) don't want autofocus.
2) don't want autoexposure.

Depth of field control is important in street and you don't have time for autofocus to find it's focus.. heck your likely to miss shots if the subject is moving.

Joe VanCleave
10-30-2009, 10:04 PM
I also have a Yashica LM, great camera; I'm going to hafta put down the Lumix G1 digital for a while and do some more medium format street work.

Katier, I like your idea of prefocusing and presetting the aperture, then varying the shutter speed for varying light. Sounds like a smart strategy. Hmm, I may have to try that with my other cameras.

~Joe

benjiboy
10-31-2009, 05:39 AM
The way people react to photographers these days I tend to use a Minox 35 GT compact, because it's quiet, has a very sharp 35mm 2.8 lens that can be focused at the hyperfocal distance, aperture priority exposure, and above all is smaller than a pack of cigarettes, so if my subject takes offense and sticks it " where the Sun don't shine" it won't be too painful :)

firecracker
10-31-2009, 06:30 AM
I still use Contax T3 for my B&W stuff. It's a damn good camera.

wobsy
10-31-2009, 10:31 AM
It comes down to what you are wanting to photograph.
I would suggest if your target is architectural then go the whole hog with tripod and whatever camera you want. But 'street photography' in my understanding usually means people doing things - or not. The problem here in the UK has got a whole lot worse recently with the 'terrorist suspect' thing so that a small unobtrusive camera seems to be the necessary tool. In my case I have ditched my OM4Ti in these instances for its older smaller brother the XA. Pre-set focus, pre-set aperture, auto exposure, - good most of the time - and built in back light compensation.

HarryW
10-31-2009, 12:43 PM
Tri-X
Leica M2
CV 40mm f1.4
Weston Master V

Harry