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View Full Version : How are Glass Plates Packaged?



Ray Rogers
05-22-2009, 03:41 AM
Hello everyone,

This is my first post in this forum...
:)

I was wondering if anyone has seen different packaging methods for glass plates?

What was the best method you have come across?

Are there (Were there?) any unique or manufacturer specific methods?

How about today, for those who still manage to buy plates, are current methods any different ?

Thanks...

Ray

Schlapp
05-22-2009, 04:52 AM
Most of mine I see are packed emulsion to emulsion in pairs with little cardboard thingies at each end. Covered in black paper, put in a nice cardboard box with a nice label. eh?

Michael W
05-22-2009, 05:52 AM
The older plates always seemed to be packed emulsion to emulsion. If there were 12 plates in the box they would be separated into 3 sets of 4 plates, with each set wrapped in dark paper. I have some Ferrania IR plates that had 6 plates in the box, wrapped in green paper in 3 groups of 2 plates, emulsion to emulsion. The 3 sets in green paper were further covered in some metal foil, presumably to help them keep in storage. The most recent plates I've used are Agfa Gevaert APX 100 & they are packed differently. 10 in a box, held apart by plastic tabs. The plates are packed all emulsion down except for the bottom one which is emulsion up. That is according to the product pdf as well as my experience.

MikeSeb
05-22-2009, 06:19 AM
One can still buy plates? Where?

Cool.

jnanian
05-22-2009, 07:25 AM
mike

there used to be an outfit in eastern europe / russia slavich ( i think )
that made dry plates .. i don't know if they still make them.
it isn't hard to coat your own, i have done that on and off since about 1987ish.

have fun!
john

PHOTOTONE
05-22-2009, 09:20 AM
In general, there are NO commercial glass plates made anywhere, none. With the possible exception of Slavich in Russia, but their plates (if still made) are not available in the USA or Western Europe (to my knowledge).

Ray Rogers
05-22-2009, 10:14 AM
The older plates always seemed to be packed emulsion to emulsion... The most recent plates I've used are Agfa Gevaert APX 100 & they are packed differently. 10 in a box, held apart by plastic tabs.

So in the older material, there were no cardboard or plastic tabs?
Just emulsion to emulsion, glass to glass, emulsion to emulsion and so on?

What do the cardboard/plastic tabs look like?

There were no interleaving tissues, say between the glass to glass surface?

---
PHOTOTONE; Ilford coats on glass plates...

AgX
05-22-2009, 10:45 AM
60 years ago Gevaert packaged plates as set of four wrapped as a whole in paper. Two plates each facing emulsion sides. A U-bent paper strip was inserted with its ends between the two emulsion surfaces of the two sets

Markus Röhling
05-22-2009, 01:34 PM
In general, there are NO commercial glass plates made anywhere, none. With the possible exception of Slavich in Russia, but their plates (if still made) are not available in the USA or Western Europe (to my knowledge).

Slavich plates are for instance available from Banse + Grohmann (Wephota) (http://www.wephota.de/fotogra.htm ) and Lumière (http://www.lumiere-shop.de/index.php?cat=c446_Glas-Mikroplatten.html ). Or you can order directly from Slavich: http://www.slavich.ru

Markus

AgX
05-22-2009, 02:50 PM
In case someone is looking for plates at Wephota:
They have not been listed in their price-lists (pdf's) the lasts years. But they are listed in their product overview ("Produktübersicht").

Markus Röhling
05-22-2009, 06:15 PM
In case someone is looking for plates at Wephota:
They have not been listed in their price-lists (pdf's) the lasts years. But they are listed in their product overview ("Produktübersicht").
And they will send you a price list for plates if asked.

Markus

Michael W
05-22-2009, 09:11 PM
So in the older material, there were no cardboard or plastic tabs?
Just emulsion to emulsion, glass to glass, emulsion to emulsion and so on?

What do the cardboard/plastic tabs look like?

There were no interleaving tissues, say between the glass to glass surface
Hi Ray, yes the older plates have no separation & are packed emulsion to emulsion & glass to glass.

With the one box of modern Agfa plates I used the plastic separators were along the length of the plate (6.5cm). Imagine a thin length of plastic with a groove cut in it. The end of the plate fits into the groove & the slight thickness of plastic above & below this keeps the plate separate from the others. I have the pdf info sheet for these & can email to anyone who wants it, send me a PM.

AgX
05-23-2009, 02:14 AM
Hi Ray, yes the older plates have no separation & are packed emulsion to emulsion & glass to glass.

Depends of what you mean by older. See post #8.

k_jupiter
05-23-2009, 02:50 AM
Slavich plates are for instance available from Banse + Grohmann (Wephota) (http://www.wephota.de/fotogra.htm ) and Lumière (http://www.lumiere-shop.de/index.php?cat=c446_Glas-Mikroplatten.html ). Or you can order directly from Slavich: http://www.slavich.ru

Markus

This was discussed a couple years ago.

http://www.apug.org/forums/forum192/43362-more-defined-level-interest-slavich-plates-us.html

Not that there isn't interest, there isn't enough interest in one size that would justify doing the import.

tim in san jose

Ray Rogers
05-23-2009, 04:11 AM
60 years ago Gevaert packaged plates as set of four wrapped as a whole in paper. Two plates each facing emulsion sides. A U-bent paper strip was inserted with its ends between the two emulsion surfaces of the two sets

Hi AgX,

I am not sure I follow...

Do you mean this arrangement:
(The x's are the bent paper strip...which should be connected!)


Paper Wrapping (on top)
PLATE #1 glass back
PLATE #1 emulsion front
xxxxxxxxx
PLATE #2 emulsion front
PLATE #2 glass back

PLATE #3 glass back
PLATE #3 emulsion front
xxxxxxxxxx
PLATE #4 emulsion front
PLATE #4 glass back
Paper Wrapping (on bottom)

So glass is touching glass, but emulsion never touches emulsion?

AgX
05-23-2009, 03:27 PM
Ray, Exactly!
With the paper strip (xxx here) forming an U, being inserted with one end a little bit into one `twin´ and with the other end inserted into the other twin.
I haven't seen it but was described by means of a sketch this way in one of Gevaert's general manuals. Gevaert also advised this sort of assembly (with paper strips) in case one would not process plates immediately but would have to store them exposed for a while.