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Michel Hardy-Vallée
08-08-2009, 10:50 PM
Help is on the way, just give some time to the Admins to work things through on the technical side...

Uncle Bill
08-10-2009, 12:53 PM
accozzaglia,

Sorry to hear your camera bag got pinched. As a long transplanted Montrealer (ok mostly gone native in Greater Toronto), my knowledge on what's going on in the city of my birth is sketchy other than a few Flickr groups. I think they have meet up like the ones in here in the GTA. Good luck with McGill, the move and finding the tool who made off with your cameras.

KWhitmore
08-10-2009, 01:13 PM
You got it. It was a reference to the quebecios separatist movement.

Steve

Non non! C'est KAY-BEC-Y-OHS! :D

Kathy

Sirius Glass
08-10-2009, 01:57 PM
Non non! C'est KAY-BEC-Y-OHS! :D

Kathy

That is the way a Canadian girlfriend taught me to say it.

Steve

Don Wallace
08-10-2009, 02:11 PM
Living in Ottawa is to be in the permanent shadow of Toronto. Not always a bad thing, but Montreal IS a lot closer. i can drive there and back for a smoked meat sandwich without anyone missing me. I would welcome a Montreal group.

PhotoJim
08-10-2009, 02:48 PM
That is the way a Canadian girlfriend taught me to say it.

I think she's picking on "québecois" versus "québecios". The first is correct. Kathy was telling you how a francophone would pronounce the second. :)

The correct word sounds approximately like kay-bek-WAH. Add an e on it and you have the feminine, kay-bek-WAHZ, in case you're referring to a woman. Add an s to either for the plural.

Thus endeth the French lesson. Bonne journée.

KWhitmore
08-10-2009, 04:26 PM
I think she's picking on "québecois" versus "québecios". The first is correct. Kathy was telling you how a francophone would pronounce the second. :)

The correct word sounds approximately like kay-bek-WAH. Add an e on it and you have the feminine, kay-bek-WAHZ, in case you're referring to a woman. Add an s to either for the plural.

Thus endeth the French lesson. Bonne journée.

Yup. :D

Sirius Glass
08-10-2009, 04:53 PM
I think she's picking on "québecois" versus "québecios". The first is correct. Kathy was telling you how a francophone would pronounce the second. :)

So much for the APUG spell checking French in the English forum.

Steve

accozzaglia
08-16-2009, 04:05 PM
accozzaglia,

Sorry to hear your camera bag got pinched. As a long transplanted Montrealer (ok mostly gone native in Greater Toronto), my knowledge on what's going on in the city of my birth is sketchy other than a few Flickr groups. I think they have meet up like the ones in here in the GTA. Good luck with McGill, the move and finding the tool who made off with your cameras.

I appreciate the condolence. It's wasn't my camera bag, but my messenger bag. Not only were cameras inside, but also my work laptop with a year's worth of my thesis notes, my identification, my uni paperwork, and all my other academic work for the last year. The legal/academic papers and laptop were only with me because I didn't trust leaving them at the hotel. So it was a perfect storm of bad — unprecedented for me, as I can't ever remember having all that with me at once when out and about. It's been long enough now that my anger is being superseded by the resolve of rebuilding, infused with a new kind of proprietor vigilance (translation: escalating and shifting an already fairly strong awareness to surroundings by articulating defensible spacing in a new way).

OK, that translation was no more helpful.

Since the theft, a lot has gone through my mind, but perhaps none more so than having listened to five different people recount five separate theft incidents at a "downtown Starbucks" — all but one either confirmed or assumed to be the location where I was, while the other was on the Ste-Catherine location (to those not in MTL, there are a total of two in centreville, or downtown, while the rest are mostly clustered out west in the Anglo ghetto). That, plus the Starbucks supervisor being wholly aware that their security camera had been disconnected for months and didn't seem to care about reconnecting it, makes me really wonder if there isn't something bigger at play here. As an urban designer, it's a new, vexing question I'm trying to ask and approach.

Worse, having learnt a little more about état civil, the distinct system of Québec law, even if I had seen the perp(s) and chased them down, my laying a hand on them, even as they'd have my bag in their hand, could have me apprehended for "assault". In the case of one story in the five aforementioned, this actually happened to one woman who chased after her thief. Both were stopped by police and apprehended. The guy claimed the laptop in the bag was his, but she responded, "OK, explain how my face is on the desktop and why my passwords work?" When her claim panned out, the thief made up an excuse that he "picked up the wrong bag." Apparently, the police didn't arrest him. In another story, the draft of a novel two years in the making, was taken. The novel was never re-written. In all, this system of procedure has left me a bit incredulous.

It won't mar, hopefully, my upcoming experience at McGill, but as I've had a bit more than a week back in Toronto (mostly rebuilding my life and documentation from scratch, literally), my feelings on Montréal are becoming a bit more . . . complicated. I want to be there and hope it'll be a great, redeeming two years, but I worry in a way that I haven't here in Toronto (where yes, my car was once broken into before) or elsewhere. At once, I feel both vulnerable and disallowed to defend myself (unless it's my body under attack, and even then, I don't know to what extent I'm "allowed" to fight back).

As for photography, I am still without a 35mm SLR and will be for a bit longer. My Pentax 645 was home, but one lens (my 75mm, not L.S.) was in the equipment bag inside my messenger bag. After seeing how well the Asahi Pentax H2 w/ 50mm f/1.4 Super-Takumar turned out in low light (http://www.flickr.com/photos/aged_accozzaglia/3805650061/), I am likely to replace it with the same lens on a similar, pre-Spotmatic body with clip-on meter. I really loved the simplicity and lightness, and the glass just amazed me. As for the stolen Nikon F-801s, I don't know what I'll be doing yet. I just really miss and pine for shooting Kodachrome and have gotten so frustrated when I'm standing somewhere, see a great shot, and then remember that I have nothing on me to capture it.

aluk
08-16-2009, 11:27 PM
Worse, having learnt a little more about état civil, the distinct system of Québec law, even if I had seen the perp(s) and chased them down, my laying a hand on them, even as they'd have my bag in their hand, could have me apprehended for "assault". In the case of one story in the five aforementioned, this actually happened to one woman who chased after her thief.... At once, I feel both vulnerable and disallowed to defend myself (unless it's my body under attack, and even then, I don't know to what extent I'm "allowed" to fight back).

As much as Quebec loves feeling separate from the rest of the country, they are still part of Canada for the time being, and so the federal (i.e. common law) criminal code is applicable there; Quebec's civil code does not deal with criminal law. Namely, it seems to me that sec. 494 would allow you to make a citizen's arrest (and presumably use reasonable restraints against a criminal) if you:

a) made the arrest at the time of the theft. Failure to do this is why the guy in Kensington market (?) was charged for tying up a guy who had shoplifted from his store a few weeks ago - the shopkeeper nabbed him hours later when he re-entered the store, and

b) delivered the person to the police asap.

Obligatory disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, and suggest that you conduct your own research into your rights. Remember, the Criminal Code of Canada is the law of the land, including in la belle province.

Sorry to hear about the theft of what sound like some of your most precious belongings. If it's any consolation, I believe that the McGill library rents out laptop locks... Also, if urban planning falls under the faculty of architecture, then I believe that you have access to their darkroom facilities (which few seem to know about), reportedly much better than the one operated by the photo club, and possibly with 24hr. access to boot... good luck!

accozzaglia
08-17-2009, 12:12 AM
As much as Quebec loves feeling separate from the rest of the country, they are still part of Canada for the time being, and so the federal (i.e. common law) criminal code is applicable there; Quebec's civil code does not deal with criminal law. Namely, it seems to me that sec. 494 would allow you to make a citizen's arrest (and presumably use reasonable restraints against a criminal) if you:

a) made the arrest at the time of the theft. Failure to do this is why the guy in Kensington market (?) was charged for tying up a guy who had shoplifted from his store a few weeks ago - the shopkeeper nabbed him hours later when he re-entered the store, and

I saw footage of the theft and later "capture", but I since was unaware the shopkeeper was charged. Too bad.

As far as the Québec angle goes, I'm getting conflicting input. On the one hand, laying a hand on a perp when they have your property in hand within moments of the actual theft (such as chasing them out the door) is supposedly assault and not distinguished from violent assault — that Québec makes no such distinction. I'd concur that that sounds like criminal law, but on the other hand, I'm getting this input indicating that had I seen the theft (or rather, my bag outside the window when seconds before it was under my chair), I could have gone after the perp(s). This would also appear to contradict what happened when one of the people whose backpack was taken from that same Starbucks chased down the guy and found herself, along with the perp, apprehended equally. It was only after how glaring the theft was when she was "let go".


b) delivered the person to the police asap.

Given that opportunity, I guarantee that would have been done. -_-



Obligatory disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, and suggest that you conduct your own research into your rights. Remember, the Criminal Code of Canada is the law of the land, including in la belle province.

Je me souviendrai, no pun intended. It's an area still unclear to me, and it's one of the first things I want to understand once I'm settled there.


Sorry to hear about the theft of what sound like some of your most precious belongings.

I just want the intangible stuff back; they can keep the material junk. I can't cough up working notes without going through all the research again, which somehow I'll eventually find a way to do, but now it may be years later than I had hoped. The "Kodak moments", meanwhile, are forever lost.


Also, if urban planning falls under the faculty of architecture, then I believe that you have access to their darkroom facilities (which few seem to know about), reportedly much better than the one operated by the photo club, and possibly with 24hr. access to boot

Yeah, it's a question I'll be asking when I get there. Faculty of arch are in the same building as school of urban planning (they are the only two faculties in that building), and my advisor is actually part of arch. Chances seem very probable I'll have access, which is good because, yeah, I saw how awful McGill's photo club system is set up (closes at 17:00? pardon?!), and it made me very sad to be leaving the facilities at the UofT. Access to the arch darkroom will more than make up for it, since I'll practically be living there anyway.