PDA

View Full Version : 11x14" vs. 8x10"



Pages : 1 [2]

verney
11-19-2009, 05:25 AM
Does this help? This is Andreas Emmel, a good friend of mine and a great photographer. He built his own 11x14 camera is is using it for pinhole and lens-based photography. He is always complaining about the weight but loves his camera.
I like his camera bag! Nice pictures on that site.

sanking
11-19-2009, 09:46 AM
Actually folks , I consider Monty a knob so he is the exception

What is the meaning of a knob as applied to a person? Is it more like a sainted person who sacrifices self for the greater good of humanity, or an up-tight anal retentive a*$ h*#e only interested in the adancement of self?

Sandy King

Bob Carnie
11-19-2009, 10:10 AM
Sandy

Knob could refer to someone that collects equipment but never uses
Knob could , like in Monty's case , be just quirkyness in behavior,
Or a Knob could be someone who measures everything in


linnnnnesss peeerrr mmmillllimmmetterr

goamules
11-19-2009, 10:55 AM
Back to the Newb (as apposed to Knob), I agree with what Joe says, smaller is often better with wetplate. By smaller I mean about half or whole plate. Keep in mind there is a lot of learning in this process, it's cheaper to shoot 50 half or quarter plates to learn your chemicals and lens, and then shoot some large ones. But if money is no object do any size you want. Keep in mind the aluminum or glass costs too, as do the chemicals, lenses, everything is more when you get above 8x10. If you want a halfplate petzval figure on $200. For a 11x14 petzval, figure on $500-$1500.

I've been shooting halfplate for two years, with inserts in my 5x7 and 8x10 cameras. For learning you may shoot at least once a week, 4-6 plates a session. If you have different size inserts for your wetplate back you have flexibility. When everything is going right, put in a large insert and shoot that 8x10! When you have an off day, save your chemicals by shooting small stuff.

Garrett

Jim Chinn
11-20-2009, 08:25 AM
I am getting into wet plate myself and although my ultimate goal is to be able to shoot 11x14, I agree with the idea of starting small. I am building a custom holder to work with an 8x10 camera that will allow me to shoot 4x5, 1/2 plate and whole plate. I have a couple of more modern lenses that are fast enough to shoot with and for the time being I will make ambro negatives in 4x5 that will allow me to do enlargements up to 11x14. With whole plate images I will experiment printing with plt/pld, albumen and Azo.

Eventually I hope to fnd an appropriate lens to cover 11x14, then I will build a camera around that. I have a 355 G Claron but it is probably a little slow for portraits.

And as others have pointed out if you plan on shooting in the field you need a darkbox. I figure that once I get a workflow established working with smaller plates I can scale up a darkbox and silver bath for 11x14.

But initially I will stick with 4x5 plates as I learn more about exposure, and the in and outs of the chemistry. Much less expensive making mistakes with smaller plates unitll I get the feel for everything.

RobertP
11-20-2009, 09:16 AM
Although I am not a re-enactor I had to come up with a period correct setup for a couple of shoots I was commissioned to do. Here is a picture of my field studio with darkbox. This darkbox is designed to do up to a 12x20 plate. A little heavy but still workable. As most ULF shooters know, weight issues can be handled with a little ingenuity.I also have a ford cargo van ( the type with no rear windows) that I work out of most of the time. I built a bulkhead with a red plexi sliding door and an overhead vent with a sliding red plexi cover. Works like a charm and there is no set up time in the field. http://www.apug.org/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=15835&stc=1&d=1258726546

RobertP
11-20-2009, 10:01 AM
But to get started in wet plate you don't need any of the stuff that I posted about above. You can go down to your local appliance store and get a dishwasher box or similar, a piece of red plexi or stained glass and a cloth shroud and some gaffers tape and you can make a darkbox that works as well as anything I have shown or mentioned.

mustard seed
11-20-2009, 04:37 PM
I built my 11x14 a year ago, with 10 film holders. I carry it a 4x5 and 2- 35mm cameras with me in the field in 4 hard cases on a cart. I had shot, 5x7 and 8x10 and wasn’t sure how I would like the 11x14.
It is heavy, it is big, it draws a crowd (which for me is a pain) but with all this I love it, for me I just love the contact size of the 11x14.
BTW, I bought Sandy’s book of carbon it’s great. Even if I don’t ever print in carbon, it’s just cool.
Thanks Sandy

eddie gunks
11-21-2009, 02:29 PM
i shoot 11x14 plates.....seldom......i have a dark box and all for up t 11x14. when i try and move the stuff my back hurts. it fills my car. so even shooting 8x10 with the box is not so much fun.

i have actually just ordered a 1/2 plate camera. i am going that size and smaller so i can move all over the place and shoot everywhere with "ease"

if you plan to use 11x14 for plates you most likely will not be going far from the studio. so be sure to get a camera that has a BIG lens board to hold the monster fast lenses you will need. my 8x8 DD board is "almost" too small for the 25 inch f5 petzval. i made threaded aluminum lens board.

i find that i am shooting 5x7 the most (no new camera yet).

eddie

goamules
11-21-2009, 05:05 PM
Yep Eddie, "Halfplate is Great!ģ"

Garrett

zrisso
11-23-2009, 03:37 PM
I built my 11x14 a year ago, with 10 film holders. I carry it a 4x5 and 2- 35mm cameras with me in the field in 4 hard cases on a cart. I had shot, 5x7 and 8x10 and wasnít sure how I would like the 11x14.
It is heavy, it is big, it draws a crowd (which for me is a pain) but with all this I love it, for me I just love the contact size of the 11x14.
BTW, I bought Sandyís book of carbon itís great. Even if I donít ever print in carbon, itís just cool.
Thanks Sandy

The drawing a crowd part is the only thing that annoys me. I've found even when I just go out to shoot with my 4x5 press camera, people feel the need to either ask me if it's digital or ask me if it shoots video... not once has anyone asked me what film I am using.

Stephen Frizza
07-30-2010, 07:32 AM
Do any of you shoot glass negs, or is this a silly question. I have a 11x14 mint enlarger and always wanted to put a 11x14 glass plate neg and project to 30x40 silver. I think it would look incredible.


.


I have glass plates in multiple large sizes and would be happy to send you either one of my 5x7", 8x10", 10x12 or 11x14" plates to print and play with if your happy to pay for the Fed-ex.

~steve

Bob Carnie
07-30-2010, 10:05 AM
I would be interested in seeing an 11x14 glass plate optically enlarged, but maybe we could get a show that hangs here in Toronto and one in Auz.
As you know Stephen I am very old and my days of play are over, but still need to pad my retirement. It will only take twenty more years .
What kind of images do you have in 11x14, send me some jpegs.


I have glass plates in multiple large sizes and would be happy to send you either one of my 5x7", 8x10", 10x12 or 11x14" plates to print and play with if your happy to pay for the Fed-ex.

~steve

Stephen Frizza
07-30-2010, 10:33 AM
I normally produce positive plates and am about to do a series of images on 5x7 but i can put something to 11x14 i have 6 plates left in 11x14. I will pull some images out and you can pic what you want i will find out how much shipping will be.

Bob Carnie
07-30-2010, 10:56 AM
I am most interested in over 8x10> 10x12 or 11x14, I am also looking at negative plates as I would love to see on FB.
maybe worth working on a series in negative/ positive , you make some Cibas and I will make some fibres from the plates you produce, could be a killer show. I have a couple of friends here in NA with gallerys that could showcase the series.



I normally produce positive plates and am about to do a series of images on 5x7 but i can put something to 11x14 i have 6 plates left in 11x14. I will pull some images out and you can pic what you want i will find out how much shipping will be.

Stephen Frizza
07-30-2010, 11:11 AM
i love 5x7" plates the most

Stephen Frizza
07-30-2010, 11:12 AM
personally im not interested in prints from large plates. they seem pointless to me.
when they are that size ide rather view the plate than a print from it.

ic-racer
07-30-2010, 03:06 PM
I don't think the added weight of 11x14 would be an issue if your are already carrying around a wet-plate setup. Lens should not be expensive; you don't need a shutter. I'd think the extra size will really make your work impressive. 8x10 reduction back is a great idea for film use. But you will probably be spoiled by the big size of your 11x14 wet plates and go for big film :)

Sirius Glass
07-30-2010, 06:36 PM
The drawing a crowd part is the only thing that annoys me. I've found even when I just go out to shoot with my 4x5 press camera, people feel the need to either ask me if it's digital or ask me if it shoots video... not once has anyone asked me what film I am using.

Last Sunday, first time out with a 4x5. Twice I got asked if it was a Speed Graphic, which it is. Both times they said their fathers had one and the photographs were wonderful. I can only imaging that the reaction with the size camera discussed in this thread that the reactions are exponent function of the format size.

Steve

eddie gunks
08-22-2010, 07:31 AM
this thread is pretty old but has been recently commented on.

11x14 for wet plate is PITA. if you do do 1114 then it is a studio only endeavor IMO.....for the beginner.

remember you need fast lenses. fast 11x14 lenses are VERY expensive and VERY BIG. only studio cameras can really hold them. you can force other cameras into service but you will find them sub standard. traveling with1114 is a real pain.

even 8x10 is a bit much IMO. i use smaller formats to travel with. most all portable 8x10 cameras lack the lens board size and the front standard for a lens that "really" covers 8x10. again, they are better suited for studio work.

all the above is directed more towards portraits. landscape work would require a slower lens as you may be shooting in open SUN. so your exposures would be significantly faster.

as a beginner i would say get an 8x10 camera. get bill schwabs holder for it. 5x7 insert and shoot 5x7 (or smaller) for a while. most all fast lenses for 5x7 will easily fit on most 8x10 lens boards that are 6x6 inches.

eddie