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nick mulder
01-20-2010, 07:52 PM
Datasheet if anyone is interested:

http://www.fujifilm.com/products/medical/brochures/pdf/index/XB_411E.pdf

Jim Fitzgerald
01-20-2010, 07:59 PM
Hi Jim,

I'm in contact with Carrie at the moment ... Looks like a go ahead

300 sheets I reckon :D

What was the expiry on the box you got ? Also, I wonder being a medical supplier if she has Collodion available, I'll ask ...

Nick, my expiration is 11/08. I have about 280 sheets left from a 500 sheet purchase. I sold 200 sheets to pay for my 300 so I'm virtually shooting 11x14 for free!! Gotta love it.

Jim

Jim Fitzgerald
01-20-2010, 08:04 PM
Thanks Gary and Jim,
I'm 60 and not sure I could cope with a camera which was heavy. I can carry this thing around and I believe the kit will be even lighter than my 8x10 set which is lighter than my 4x5. I can't wait to make a negative, Jim, it will be the same kind of experience as my first 8x10 only better!!:p...Evan Clarke

Evan, I'm behind you by a year and my 11x14 kit when I go out comes in at about 45lbs. give or take. This is with 3 lenses and two film holders in an MEI backpack. My huge 14lb. Walnut tripod I carry in my free hand. I can't go as far from the truck as I used to but I keep myself in good shape so if I want to I can. Gets harder ever year. One of those baby jogger things is in the distant future.

Jim

nick mulder
01-20-2010, 08:20 PM
Nick, my expiration is 11/08. I have about 280 sheets left from a 500 sheet purchase. I sold 200 sheets to pay for my 300 so I'm virtually shooting 11x14 for free!! Gotta love it.

Jim

Nice work ! cheeky even :p

You mentioned shooting in the sun, which will be green laden but in terms of indoor - I'm assuming tungsten wont be so affective, maybe flash will be ok ?

the spec sheet doesn't go into spectral sensitivity ...

Ria
01-20-2010, 08:58 PM
Looking back, my ascent into ULF seems almost inevitable. My first camera was a plastic Kodak. Some years later I inherited my parents' Kodak Pony, a "real" camera, with adjustments and decisions to make. Then the Pony retired as a result of the unavailability of 828 film and I got my first 35mm camera, a Ricoh KR-5.
I was quite happy with "miniature" film for a long time; then there was that fateful day. A friend showed me some medium format, (6x6 cm), negatives and it was all over but the shoutin'.
From medium format I went to 4x5 by putting together one of those Bender kits. I saw the 4x5 negs and thought, "This is plenty big."
Then I went to a camera show and sale and bought a 5x7 Kodak 2-D for $80. (I had just sold an unused 35mm camera for $80, so I took that as a sign.) An 8x10 followed shortly thereafter and a couple of years ago I got a Korona Banquet View 12x20. But that's as big as I plan to go. Really.
Ria

P.S. Anybody else out there with two X chromosomes shooting ULF?

Jim Fitzgerald
01-20-2010, 08:59 PM
Nice work ! cheeky even :p

You mentioned shooting in the sun, which will be green laden but in terms of indoor - I'm assuming tungsten wont be so affective, maybe flash will be ok ?

the spec sheet doesn't go into spectral sensitivity ...

Nick, I still need to try more situations with this film. Some still lives are in order with my Fresnel for the tungsten or portraits maybe. The green sensitive seems to work in shadowed light very well. 3 stop range stuff. Contrasty light I just adjust development. Check out the thread on the LFF about x-ray film in the film and developing section for some additional info. One thing I know is that I have some very nice images with this film and some nice carbon prints from it.

jim

jgjbowen
01-20-2010, 09:20 PM
P.S. Anybody else out there with two X chromosomes shooting ULF?

A few years ago I met Patricia (can't remember her last name for the life of me). She shot 7x17, but she just sold her 7x17 gear about a month ago.

Craig Griffiths
01-20-2010, 09:54 PM
I started with 4x5, then tried an 8x10 and preferred it. Bought an 8x20 and liked that even more so got rid of the 4x5. I have just ordered an 11x14 and have the bellows for a 20x24 I hope to make soon. Why? I like a contact print and it has been a logical progression for me so far. As my eyesight goes the prints need to get bigger to be able to see them.

Atlo
01-21-2010, 12:10 AM
i've heard you can use those wheeled coolers (sort of like a rolling bookbag) as an okay carrier for large format cameras and stuff.
also they are cheap. or something like that.

photo8x10
01-21-2010, 05:26 AM
I started with 4x5" after I read the Negative by Adams, and for lots of time I shot with this format, but I started to change my mind after an Andrea Modica's workshop where I watched for the first time in a 8x10" groundglass, althought I decided to change my camera after I saw an Edward Weston exhibition.I bought an 8x10" after some year I decided also to buy an 8x20". I contact print all my negatives on Azo or Lodima and sometimes, but now it's quiterarely in Platinum/Palladium.

Tom Kershaw
01-21-2010, 05:45 AM
photo8x10,

What made you decide on the print process, i.e. silver gelatin or pt/pd?

Tom

photo8x10
01-21-2010, 08:52 AM
Hi Tom,
Now I'm printing everything on silver gelatin,and contact print, sometimes I had used pt/pd because I was looking for a different way for my prints, I love printing on pt/pd but for my feeling the lackness of glossy or semi-matt papers is a big problem, I love, in fact, this kind of surface.I'm not keen on matt surface.

Tom Kershaw
01-21-2010, 10:32 AM
I'm not the only person that likes a gloss surface then. A current trend with all the alternative process work going on does seem to be for matt surfaces.

Tom

Zebra
01-21-2010, 11:40 AM
My descent into the abyss started with an RZ67. Even that little waistlevel viewfinder was mesmorizing to me. A cruddy old Green Giant Calumet 8 x 10 soon followed. I didn't even know how to develop film--dropping it off at the processor in town like it was color slide film. They all looked at me like I was nuts, which of course was accurate. I then started doing my own processing out of sheer financial survival, loved the process as much as the end product if not more, and started to realize even with my limitations as a somewhat pedestrian photographer, that a life needed something useless in it with no joy demanded except for the act of doing. I ended up buying an 8 x 10 Ebony, a lifetime purchase I thought that would end there. Fool. I had business in Japan and contacted Hiromi at Ebony via email to say I would be in Tokoyo and that I owned one of his camera's and was wondering where I should go to shoot it when i came to town. Instead of telling me, he and his incredible family, wife and daughter, arranged to come by at 5 in the morning so they could spend the rest of the day showing me wonderful spots to shoot in the countryside. It was an incredible experience. They are such an amazing family of generosity, humor and knowledge and void of ego. Went home and over the next year life led to the need to sell the ranch we were living on in Texas. In a fit of disappointment one night over the fact that we were going to sell and move, mixed with some Oban, a wonderful single malt, I hatched a Quioxtic plan of uselessness by devising a strategy of what we wanted to get out of the ranch for our regular lives and then I added the price of a 20 x 24 Ebony into the mix and challenged myself to try and negotiate into the final bargain. It worked and I ordered the camera the day after closing.

The camera's name of course is 'The Don'. The Dallmeyer 8D which weighs 18.3 lbs that goes on it is named in honor of the late great Richard Pryor, 'Ass for Days'.

I am quite happy chasing my windmills--The Don, Ass for Days and me meandering around Asheville looking for really slow things that don't move much to shoot in either Wet Plate Collodion or Platinum/Palladium and Platinum/Palladium gumover.

If you see me don't throw me a rope. I don't want to be saved,

Zebra

Brickbird
01-21-2010, 02:28 PM
I was making a custom rope for 'ya but I'll toss it in the garbage.......just throw me some Lagavulin or Talisker when I go over the cliff.........Tav

nick mulder
01-21-2010, 09:27 PM
I found that 8D on ebay (the tread at Quinns site also)

>>insert generic blasphemy spelled out to emphasize the phonetic emphasis here<<

I'm just a lowly 4A owner - penis envy, perhaps a bit more like brassiere sizes :o

roodpe
01-22-2010, 10:39 AM
Found a crown graphic at work and started with that (4x5). Progressed to 5x7 and 8x10. Saw Kenro Izu's work (14x20 platinum contacts) and bought a Deardorff 14x20 back. Never found a Deardorff camera to match the back so I had Richard Ritter build one. Added an 8x20 back (also made by Deardorff). 8x20 for a panaromic view and 14x20 which is essentially the same proportion as 5x7 is a nice combo for ulf. The Ritter camera is under 20-lbs and that makes it manageable. This is my limit and I don't see anything bigger on the horizon. Based on my experiences with this camera, I am even more amazed by the guys who shoot 18x22 and 20x24. That is altogether another level of photography. Maybe instead of ulf, it should be called clf (crazy large format).

Pete

sanking
01-22-2010, 02:48 PM
Found a crown graphic at work and started with that (4x5). Progressed to 5x7 and 8x10. Saw Kenro Izu's work (14x20 platinum contacts) and bought a Deardorff 14x20 back.

Pete

Where did you find 14X20 holders? I have never run across one, but if Deardorff made a 14X20 back there must be some out there.

Sandy King

roodpe
01-22-2010, 11:50 PM
Where did you find 14X20 holders? I have never run across one, but if Deardorff made a 14X20 back there must be some out there.

Sandy King

Sandy,

I had the holders custom made. Film was custom cut also. Jack Deardorff originally came up with the format for Kenro Izu. It was the largest format that could be adapted to the Deardorff 12x20. The story I heard from the guys at Lens and Repro was that Izu wanted 20x24 and Jack Deardorff talked him into 14x20. The back I bought was made at the same time.

Pete

sanking
01-23-2010, 09:33 AM
Sandy,

I had the holders custom made. Film was custom cut also. Jack Deardorff originally came up with the format for Kenro Izu. It was the largest format that could be adapted to the Deardorff 12x20. The story I heard from the guys at Lens and Repro was that Izu wanted 20x24 and Jack Deardorff talked him into 14x20. The back I bought was made at the same time.

Pete

Pete,

Thanks for the interesting story. You had me going there with that format!!

I am playing around with having a 10X24" back built for my 20X24 RR camera. I already have some holders that are left over from a custom order for 10X24" holders.

The only question is, will I continue down this ULF road of obsessive insanity or try to scratch my way back up the cliff to some semblance of common sense before I die.

Sandy King