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darinwc
01-15-2010, 02:28 PM
No relation to poster, but I came across this and said WTF!?

Microscope Slide: Microphotograph, “Notre Dame, Paris”

anyone know anything about this?

ebay item#:
230420802342

keithwms
01-15-2010, 02:38 PM
Looks like a microfiche photograph. If you wanted to archive images, you would reduce them onto slides....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microform

DLawson
01-17-2010, 08:33 PM
No relation to poster, but I came across this and said WTF!?

Microscope Slide: Microphotograph, “Notre Dame, Paris”

anyone know anything about this?

ebay item#:
230420802342

That reminds me of my first odd photographic vocabulary lesson.
There is microphotography and photomiscroscopy. One is making small pictures (like microfilm) and the other is making pictures of small things (like bacteria). Wish I could reliably remember which was which (not that it comes up much these days).

puderse
01-19-2010, 08:25 AM
A microphotograph is a tiny photograph. Like a photo of rocket plans reduced to the size of a period and put onto a bible belonging to a spy. A photomicrograph is a very, very close up. Like the hairs up a fly's nose. So what's a macrophotograph?

richard ide
01-19-2010, 03:19 PM
A photomicrograph is a photo taken through a microscope. A macrophotograph is a close up. So I guess in some instances the terminology might be ambiguous.

Q.G.
01-20-2010, 01:13 PM
A photomicrograph is a photo taken through a microscope. A macrophotograph is a close up. So I guess in some instances the terminology might be ambiguous.

A macrophotograph is a very large photograph (analogous to a microphotograph being a very small photograph). A close up is properly called a photomacrograph.
So though the usual name is macrophotography, it's really photomacrography.
Macrophotography is what you do using an enlarger. ;)

puderse
01-22-2010, 08:07 AM
Q.G.---I think you got it right!

My Greek thesaurus: Macro=long, large, lengthy, wide, broad; Micro=small, little, diminutive; Photo=light,fire; Graph=to write (not wright, rite, or right), draw, to inscribe.

Mix and match in English and you get what makes our language unsurpassed when it comes to technology.

jnanian
01-22-2010, 12:55 PM
the question is ... is it contact printed ( on azo ) or enlarged ...