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jamie young
03-07-2010, 09:32 PM
Noblex is considered one of the best of the swing lense cameras, and you'll probably have a lot of fun with it.
When mechanical cameras sit around a while they need a bit of use to run smoothly, and dust and grit are a issue. If you run into banding you might need a cleaning. just a fact of life with this type of camera. Look forward to seeing your results

sanking
03-08-2010, 11:06 PM
Noblex is considered one of the best of the swing lense cameras, and you'll probably have a lot of fun with it.
When mechanical cameras sit around a while they need a bit of use to run smoothly, and dust and grit are a issue. If you run into banding you might need a cleaning. just a fact of life with this type of camera. Look forward to seeing your results

The Noblex 6/150 U arrived today, with the slow speed module and Panlux meter. Everything seems to be in real good shape, and working as it should. I will check for banding tomorrow by running a few rolls of film through the camera.

The camera has three positions for focus, #1, #5 and Infinity. With the depth of field of #5 I suspect that I will use that position about 95% of the time. Unfortunately there is no shift, as I rather assumed there would be with this model. I probably would have used shift a lot as I really like to keep good perspective. On the other hand I will be scanning about 100% of the negatives I made with this camera and perspective can easily be corrected in PS, as I already do for all of my MF work with Mamiya 7II and Fuji GW690III.

Sandy King

sanking
03-09-2010, 11:41 AM
Well, live and learn. I just read the instruction book and found that I do indeed have shift with the 6/150 U, but to engage it one has to open the front as when placing the filters or close-up lenses. I was expecting to see the shift on the fromt below the distance and aperture settings, but the U is apparently an older model and the shift can only be engaged by opening the front of the camera.

Sandy King

Richard Wasserman
03-09-2010, 12:06 PM
Oh come on, the male of the species isn't supposed to read instructions....

I'm glad you learned how to shift the lens–should be very useful.

David A. Goldfarb
03-09-2010, 12:14 PM
Yes, shift is a feature that I wish I had on mine. I also pasted a white label on top of the viewfinder so I can write down what kind of film I have in the camera or other notes, and some arrows in a circle reminding me which way to turn the darn barrel for changing filters so I don't loose a frame (counterclockwise, if you haven't read that part of the manual).

sanking
03-09-2010, 02:13 PM
Yes, shift is a feature that I wish I had on mine. I also pasted a white label on top of the viewfinder so I can write down what kind of film I have in the camera or other notes, and some arrows in a circle reminding me which way to turn the darn barrel for changing filters so I don't loose a frame (counterclockwise, if you haven't read that part of the manual).

Learning to use this camera and the slow speed and exposure models has turned out be a bit more complicated than I expected. I spent most of last evening trying to figure out how to work the slow speed module, and most of this morning with the exposure module. Making negatives with the Noblex may turn out to be as much art as science, literally.

One thing that is really neat about the exposure module is that it actually controls exposure by slowing up or speeding up the travel of the drum to compensate for lighter or darker areas of the image. That could be a very useful feature if it works well.

Sandy

sanking
03-10-2010, 09:19 PM
Made it out today to test the newly acquired (used) Noblex 6/150 U. I was using ASA 100 film, rated at EI 50, so put the slow time module on the camera, and also exposed with the Panlux meter, which sets the shutter speed after you manually set (and program in) lens aperture.

Good news is that all of the equipment is working perfectly and I made a number of nice well-exposed negatives, with very even tones and no sign of banding. And using the shift was much easier in real time than I anticipated.

Bad news is that I made a bunch of careless mistakes from lack of familiarity with the equipment which resulted in several poorly exposed negatives. But those mistakes sent me back to the instruction manual(s) and next time out I hope to be better prepared. With the slow time module and exposure meter control this camera is fairly complex, certainly not as easy to use as a point and shoot film camera!

In terms of image quality my impression agrees with the comments made by others, i.e. it makes remarkable negatives with wall-to-wall sharpness and excellent contrast. The lens is a 50mm f/4.5 Docteur Optic.

Sandy King

Loris Medici
03-11-2010, 06:07 AM
Sandy, have fun with your new camera! I'm sure you'll squeeze very nice images out of it...

Regards,
Loris.

jamie young
03-11-2010, 07:38 AM
Some of the rotating cameras have a built in shift, with the lense shifted up. My roundshot 35 http://www.jamieyoungphoto.com/roundshot%201.html for example. My bigger roundshot 70 mm has the ability to shift a great deal but only upward. When you need to shift down you can turn the camera upside down to shoot, though its a pain. I've been doing some shooting with antique (1900-1910 vintage)"al vista" swing lense cameras, mostly with a 7" by 16" camera. They were very frustrating as the "viewfinders" are basically worthless. I've had some pleasant surprises from the start, kind of enjoying the mystery when shooting now. http://www.jamieyoungphoto.com/AlVista%20photos%201.html and http://www.jamieyoungphoto.com/alvistacameras1.html When using your noblex, keep that in mind. I'd love to get one of the noblex cameras, but not right now. have fun!

sanking
03-14-2010, 11:01 PM
Attached is one of my first negatives made with the Noblex 6/150 U. This is straight from the scanner except for the frame.

Fuji Acros, two seconds at f/11. Developed in Pyrocat-HD 1:1:100, 20 minutes at 70F, with minimal agitation. Subject was low contrast so N+ development was required.

The subject was in downtown Greenville, SC, about five minutes by car from my home.

Sandy King

David A. Goldfarb
03-14-2010, 11:26 PM
Looks like you're off to a good start. Nice pano subject!

Mick Fagan
03-15-2010, 06:13 AM
I agree with David and it looks particularly good when the extreme right wall and the power pole, are in perfect vertical alignment.

Mick.

mlogue
03-16-2010, 10:59 PM
Hey, that's a sweet photo from your new Noblex! I took a workshop with Macduff Everton a few years ago, and he shared a tip with the class - if you're using a Noblex, you can buy a small bullseye bubble level and secure it to the top front of the camera with silicone caulk, so it's visible when looking through the viewfinder. The level included in the camera viewfinder itself is only for one axis, and you'll need both axes level in order to have completely level horizons.

Ian Grant
03-17-2010, 01:10 AM
Thanks for posting that image Sandy, it's interesting to see how the perspective changes which works well in this particular image. Hopefully we'll see some more images shot with it.

Ian

sanking
03-18-2010, 07:11 PM
Hey, that's a sweet photo from your new Noblex! I took a workshop with Macduff Everton a few years ago, and he shared a tip with the class - if you're using a Noblex, you can buy a small bullseye bubble level and secure it to the top front of the camera with silicone caulk, so it's visible when looking through the viewfinder. The level included in the camera viewfinder itself is only for one axis, and you'll need both axes level in order to have completely level horizons.

Interesting about the levels. My finder in fact has levels on both axes. Perhaps I misunderstood what you meant? I would have thought that even the earliest finders would have had this feature.

Sandy

David A. Goldfarb
03-18-2010, 07:14 PM
Mine has a level for the horizon visible in the finder and a very slow fore/aft level visible outside the finder. I usually use the camera on a tripod and just put a bullseye level on top of the finder to adjust it quickly.

Henning Serger
03-25-2010, 04:13 PM
Distribution has become difficult since KWD has been having financial difficulties, so I don't think there is a current US distributor that can get things reliably for Noblex, and same for Robert White, which used to be a Noblex distributor. Calumet and Photo Habitat were Noblex dealers, so they may have a few odd items. RTS was the US distributor, but I gather that RTS has dropped them....

http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/tags/noblex/

Hello David,

AFAIK the financial difficulties at Kamerawerke Dresden has been solved in the meantime. There was a critical time in the last year, when the production of the 35mm models were stopped. But last autumn the production was started again.

Distributors are listed here:
http://www.kwdo.de/deutsch/noblex/frameset.htm

@Sandy: Wish you a lot of fun and excellent pictures with your Noblex!
I am still dreaming of one....:).

Best regards,
Henning

sanking
03-25-2010, 04:23 PM
Hello David,

AFAIK the financial difficulties at Kamerawerke Dresden has been solved in the meantime. There was a critical time in the last year, when the production of the 35mm models were stopped. But last autumn the production was started again.

Distributors are listed here:
http://www.kwdo.de/deutsch/noblex/frameset.htm

@Sandy: Wish you a lot of fun and excellent pictures with your Noblex!
I am still dreaming of one....:).

Best regards,
Henning



Henning,

Good to hear that the company is over its financial difficulties. Not sure how complicated it is to service these cameras but if that were necessary I would like to have it serviced by the company that made the camera if possible.

I am right now in the process of scanning gallery proofs of some 30+ rolls of film that I shot with the Noblex 1/150U last weekend on Ossabaw Island. I made a few mechanical errors but the camera gave good results when my brain adjusted to its method of working. The biggest difficult for me is to remember to press the shutter release before winding the film since this is not the way most MF cameras work. I have ruined several rolls of film this way. Also, I have been startled at how fast the exposure meter, which actually controls the speed of rotation during exposure, goes through the batteries. I went through two sets of of the small N batteries for about every twenty rolls of film. Course, many of my exposures were long so the battery was working some three or four minutes for each exposure. Interestingly, I was afraid that the weak part of the camera would be the batteries that run the camera itself, but I am still working with the first set of the 1.5 volt Double A batteries that I started with.

Sandy King

David A. Goldfarb
03-25-2010, 04:33 PM
Thanks for the update, Henning!

sanking
03-25-2010, 08:41 PM
Here are a few snaps from my use of the Noblex on Ossabaw. These are just quick scans with a minimum of adjustment for showing here. No prints from any of these yet.

Negatives on either Efke 25 or Acros 100, both developed in two-bath Pyrocat-MC 1:10. The Efke negatives have a bit more contrast than I would like but scan OK on the Epson V700.

Sandy King