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Mahler_one
03-25-2010, 09:12 PM
Attached is one of my first negatives made with the Noblex 6/150 U. This is straight from the scanner except for the frame.

Fuji Acros, two seconds at f/11. Developed in Pyrocat-HD 1:1:100, 20 minutes at 70F, with minimal agitation. Subject was low contrast so N+ development was required.

The subject was in downtown Greenville, SC, about five minutes by car from my home.

Sandy King

Really impressive work Sandy...well done...thanks very much for sharing.

Ed

sanking
03-28-2010, 10:28 PM
One of the continuing problems I have with the Noblex is viewing through the finder. Since there are no bright lines in the finder the view widens and narrows depending on the distance of the eye from the finder. Does anyone know if there is some standard way of viewing that is recommended to assure that what one sees through the finder is very close to what is actually on film?

Sandy King

David A. Goldfarb
03-28-2010, 10:47 PM
It seems to me, particularly since I wear glasses, that I have to look through the finder at different angles to see the edges of the frame. My experience is that you can't see wider than what you can see in the finder, even if you need to move your head from side to side to see the edges of the frame, and the frame edges are accurate.

My camera doesn't have shift, so I don't know how the finder on your Noblex registers that.

sanking
03-29-2010, 01:45 PM
It seems to me, particularly since I wear glasses, that I have to look through the finder at different angles to see the edges of the frame. My experience is that you can't see wider than what you can see in the finder, even if you need to move your head from side to side to see the edges of the frame, and the frame edges are accurate.

My camera doesn't have shift, so I don't know how the finder on your Noblex registers that.


Thanks for the information. I will set up the camera this afternoon and try to frame as you suggest by including everything in the frame that I can see by moving my eye from side to side to see the frame edges. It makes sense to me that you are correct about this because my prior efforts to evaluate the field of view by looking at the viewfinde with my eye in the center has resulted in a wider field of view on film than I saw in the finder.

Sandy King

sanking
03-29-2010, 07:24 PM
Yoshino cherry tree at Clemson University.

I went over to Clemson on Sunday with Jim Shanesy of Maryland, who was down here with his daughter checking out some colleges and universities in South Carolina. Jim like the trees and the weather conditions (overcast and misty but dead still) but had to get on the road back to Maryland and was not able to do any photography. I sent him a copy of this image and he suggested I post it. This is a quick scan of one of my negatives. I put the border around it and resized for APUG and that is that. Film was Efke R25 developed in Pyrocat-MC 1+1+100, 15 minutes at 70F with minimal agitation (once every three minutes).

I made a few other very nice negatives of the Yoshino trees in the same shoot. The wide aspect of the 6X12cm format seems to favor the elegance of the limbs of this lovely tree. This is one of the trees you see around the Washington tidal basin and they are now at about peak as I understand it.

Sandy King

c6h6o3
03-29-2010, 08:53 PM
This is one of the trees you see around the Washington tidal basin and they are now at about peak as I understand it.



Not quite at peak. They should peak this weekend (http://dc.about.com/b/2010/03/22/when-will-the-cherry-blossoms-bloom.htm), just in time for the Festival.

The ones at Clemson were at absolute peak yesterday.

sanking
03-29-2010, 10:09 PM
It seems to me, particularly since I wear glasses, that I have to look through the finder at different angles to see the edges of the frame. My experience is that you can't see wider than what you can see in the finder, even if you need to move your head from side to side to see the edges of the frame, and the frame edges are accurate.

My camera doesn't have shift, so I don't know how the finder on your Noblex registers that.

I took careful notes of the exact coverage through the viewfinder today in some tests. You are correct. Even when moving the eye from side to wide to see the edge of the frame the actual recording on the film is slightly more than the eye can see.

There is a rectangular cut out in center of the top of the frame of the viewfinder. With the lens shifted upward the top of the cut out corresponds to the top of the image that will be recorded on film.

Sandy King

sanking
03-29-2010, 11:11 PM
Here is another one of the Clemson Yoshino cherry trees.

Fuji Acros, Pyrocat-MC 1+1+100, 20 minutes at 70F with agitation every three minutes.

Sandy King

mfohl
05-03-2010, 03:11 PM
Hi Sandy, as to your question "Is this a good camera?", I think it's a great camera. I have some Nikon 35 mm stuff and some Mamiya TLR stuff, and the Noblex with the Tessar lens is the sharpest and contrastiest lens of the lot. It will give you super images. There are two caveats. First, be careful how you load the film; follow the instructions to a T. If you don't, you will have overlapping images and won't get the full panoramic view. Although the negatives are still useable. And second, it took me a while to get used to the whole panorama thing. You have to be close to things because they really get smaller in a hurry the farther out they are. And if you are close to something flat, like a wall or a building, horizontal lines will curve. This can be a good technique, but you need some experience to take advantage of it.

If you like to play with cameras, you should love this one.

Cheers,

-- Mark

sanking
05-05-2010, 06:59 AM
Hi Sandy, as to your question "Is this a good camera?", I think it's a great camera. I have some Nikon 35 mm stuff and some Mamiya TLR stuff, and the Noblex with the Tessar lens is the sharpest and contrastiest lens of the lot. It will give you super images. There are two caveats. First, be careful how you load the film; follow the instructions to a T. If you don't, you will have overlapping images and won't get the full panoramic view. Although the negatives are still useable. And second, it took me a while to get used to the whole panorama thing. You have to be close to things because they really get smaller in a hurry the farther out they are. And if you are close to something flat, like a wall or a building, horizontal lines will curve. This can be a good technique, but you need some experience to take advantage of it.

If you like to play with cameras, you should love this one.

Cheers,

-- Mark

I have done enough work with the Noblex 150 U to know that it is capable of outstanding results. But yes, you have to follow the loading instructions to a T and there are a number of other small details that can ruin your work if you don't pay attention to them. And some things just do not seem to work on my camera, even following the instructions, for example the battery check.

As you point out, it can be important to be very close to things unless what you are after is just a big panorama with no foreground information. After all, you are using a 50mm lens that to make an image that is a full 120 cm wide. A 50mm lens even on 6X9 (which is really only about 85 cm wide) gives an extremely wide field so just imagine what adding about 35 cm to the long dimension does for the Noblex.

Sandy King

sanking
05-11-2010, 07:57 PM
Image made with Noblex 150U. Añisclo Canyon in Ordesa National Park, Pyrenees in Aragón. Ilford XP2 film, one second at f/22.

The actual distance from the far left side of this image to the far right side is about 100 yards. The camera is about two meters from the center tree, which is a very large beech.

Sandy King

europanorama
09-08-2010, 04:01 AM
I have a previous model with a fixed focus (Docter Optics) lens. The camera has always worked flawlessly and the lens is incredibly sharp and wonderful. I too would be interested in filters, etc.

noblex canada has such lenses. are they still around?

europanorama
09-08-2010, 04:07 AM
Sandy, FWIW I use a Noblex 135UC, which I've had for a couple of years and it has proved very reliable. The small amount of lens shift I find very useful also the multiple exposure feature.

What can be a little problematic is the mechanics of the slower exposures. For example, for a 1 second shutter exposure the whole process of lens movement takes approx. 1 minute to complete. Not too encouraging for that 'decisive moment' :)

Like you mine was also a bit of a compulsive purchase but one I can honestly say I've no regrets. Enjoy :)

the newer or newest model did have a short-rotation-mechanisme. not turning around every time. pls could someone knowing this explain.

europanorama
09-08-2010, 04:21 AM
Made it out today to test the newly acquired (used) Noblex 6/150 U. I was using ASA 100 film, rated at EI 50, so put the slow time module on the camera, and also exposed with the Panlux meter, which sets the shutter speed after you manually set (and program in) lens aperture.

Good news is that all of the equipment is working perfectly and I made a number of nice well-exposed negatives, with very even tones and no sign of banding. And using the shift was much easier in real time than I anticipated.

Bad news is that I made a bunch of careless mistakes from lack of familiarity with the equipment which resulted in several poorly exposed negatives. But those mistakes sent me back to the instruction manual(s) and next time out I hope to be better prepared. With the slow time module and exposure meter control this camera is fairly complex, certainly not as easy to use as a point and shoot film camera!

In terms of image quality my impression agrees with the comments made by others, i.e. it makes remarkable negatives with wall-to-wall sharpness and excellent contrast. The lens is a 50mm f/4.5 Docteur Optic.

Sandy King
docter

rogein
09-08-2010, 05:15 PM
noblex canada has such lenses. are they still around?

AFAIK, yes. I purchased a closeup lens for my 6/150E back in March of this year. Sigge also said he has a sufficient stock of parts to continue servicing the Noblex Pro series for the next 10 years.

Roger...

ufpd
11-06-2010, 09:57 PM
Hi!

I am testing a 6/150ux and I am very happy with the initial results. The first b&w roll worked flawesly.
The user manual has a typo, 5 for S so I got confused and missloading the camera and lost one frame in the second roll
But when I developed the Provia 100 roll I found the camera oversized the space between frames. And I got 2 unexposed frames (one in each roll)
Then I loaded a ruined film and check the film position after load and after the last frame and It seems to work ok.
Can the bad loading be the problem with the space between frames?
Any tip will be greatly apreciated, sorry about my english

Alejandro
www.gulminelli.com
Buenos Aires, Argentina

ufpd
11-09-2010, 08:26 PM
anybody can help me?

David A. Goldfarb
11-09-2010, 08:43 PM
Unless there is something wrong with the film advance, spacing problems or missing frames are likely to be the result of loading error.

When you load the camera, the large arrows on the film backing should line up with the red dot inside the camera, and the counter should be on "S". Then close the back, and advance to "1".

Do not push the shutter button to advance the counter past "S" until you close the back. If you do, you need to advance the counter all the way around back to "S" before loading the film and closing the back.

mfohl
01-17-2011, 10:30 AM
Hi Sandy, I have a Noblex 150; don't think it's a U model because the slow shutter speed module doesn't fit. Anyway, it has the sharpest and contrastiest lens that I own, better than the 35mm Nikkors and Mamiya TLR lenses. It is extremely sharp. My exposures are all right on. I do mostly sunny 16 stuff, and in lower light situations I meter with my 35 Nikkor and set accordingly.

It does have some mechanical issues. If you don't follow the film loading instructions to a T, you may have overlapping images. And now I get overlapping images sometimes when I do follow the instructions. So I'm going to send away for service. And even with overlapping images, sometimes the negatives are usable.

You should be able to find filters on ebay. And there was a guy in Holland who made them; can't remember his name.

The camera will take some getting used to, as it is extremely panoramic. Tilt the camera up or down slightly, and close (5-10 meters) horizontal lines bend in the middle. And that's not necessarily a bad thing, but be aware that it's there.

I've had fun with mine, although it is not my primary camera. I do know a couple of other folks who use it more than I do, and they do very nice work.

Good luck, and have fun.

-- Mark