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View Full Version : The first Rolleiflex, the Original



Andy38
03-19-2010, 02:53 PM
They are four.
They were born between 1929 and 1932.
They are not easy to use : if you try to put a 120 rollfilm in it, you can't close the back ! Screen is dark; and, if you don't pay attention, you don't remember if you have taken the picture : you advance the film; or not...
But these Original's are so lovely !

Number 1, the 611, the older with Tessar f4,5 taking lens, and number 2, the 612 (f3,8), have not a hinged back : some light may pass through...
Number 3 (613, f,4,5) and number 4 (614, f3,8) have a hinged back.

If you find one and like it, then you'll love TLR's !

Ektagraphic
03-19-2010, 03:07 PM
Built to last....a few lifetimes :)
Are the lenses coated in these?

Andy38
03-19-2010, 03:22 PM
No, lenses are not coated; these have no modifications.

clickclackstart
03-23-2010, 04:28 PM
I've got a late 30ies Rolleicord II (Triotar 3,5) and a "fake TLR" Voigtländer Brillant "Landschaft-Gruppe-Portrait" (Landscape-Group-Portrait) from the year 1933 which my Grandma got as a birthday present when she was twelve.

And yes, I love them both, it's great to take pictures with them, I even used the Cord for my holiday pictures last year and they were lovely - although most of them were in colour (Kodak Portra 160 NC is a nice film for these cameras).

Best regards from Germany!

Jeff Kubach
03-23-2010, 09:16 PM
I love my Rolleiflex but those are awesome!

Jeff

diser
03-24-2010, 01:15 AM
I have only one "Original" in my collection, and I love it.

bsdunek
03-24-2010, 08:17 AM
Didn't the first Rolleis use 117 film? If so, 120 wouldn't fit. You're right, they are really nice. Always the best quality. I have a book about the history of Franke & Heidecke (sp?), but not where I can find it. It's really interesting.
My 1949 model has a coated Schneider taking lens and an uncoated viewing lens. Takes really sharp photos even though this isn't supposed to be the best lens. I love using it.

Andy38
03-24-2010, 10:51 AM
Yes, Original's used 117 film and too big 120 spool doesn't fit.
But they often were modified to use 620, which fits but with a smallest hole : the winding key to insert the film spool was changed; and some could use 117 and 620 :

JPD
04-07-2010, 09:35 AM
I have film in my near mint Original Rolleiflex 3,8. I re-spooled the film on a 620-spool (it fits in the bottom chamber), and use a 117 as the take-up spool. I'll have to unload the film in the darkroom.

The 117-spool is like a mix between 120 and 620. The wooden spool diameter and keyholes are like in a 120, but the flanges have a smaller diameter just like a 620.

On a 117-roll you could take six 6x6 exposures. It was called "B1" or "6x6-film" in Germany. 120-film was called "B2" or "6x9-film".

120-film didn't have the markings for 6x6 back then, so when the first Rolleiflex Standard came on the market in 1932 you lined up the 6x9-marking for the first frame in the red window on the bottom of the camera, and then engaged the mechanical counter. The first batch of the Standard also had a red window on the back to use with 117-film.

JPD
04-07-2010, 09:37 AM
Andy, do you have an original Rolleiflex with a later added mechanical counter?

Andy38
04-07-2010, 11:21 AM
Andy, do you have an original Rolleiflex with a later added mechanical counter?

Here is one, with a cog-wheel inside.
It works, but I think red window on the back works better...

JPD
04-07-2010, 03:59 PM
Here is one, with a cog-wheel inside.
It works, but I think red window on the back works better...

Thanks for the pictures! It's the counter I thought about. Doesn't the wheel push that side of the film out of focus?

Andy38
04-07-2010, 05:10 PM
Doesn't the wheel push that side of the film out of focus?

A spring holds the wheel and the film pressure plate pushes it.
But I don't think it pushes entirely. So one side of the film may be some out of focus.
I have not made pictures with this camera, but I think you are right.

ic-racer
04-07-2010, 05:32 PM
Nice to see these historic cameras preserved.