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naugastyle
05-17-2010, 01:06 AM
This year I began experimenting with always leaving film cassettes in the plastic canisters to see if it would cut down on the scratches I get from dust getting onto the leader/felt. I'll admit that I didn't exactly take notes on the results, but my observations were that I got the same amount of scratches as before; which is to say, rarely and unpredictably.

For travel, I generally carry my film in a gallon-size freezer-thickness plastic zip bags. The most I have carried with the canisters is 40 (I do not have separate check-in luggage). For an upcoming trip I will need minimum 70 rolls (50 days of travel--and although my average at the end of a trip is always barely over one roll per day, I'm worried about being too conservative) and I am not sure yet what I'll do about canisters. If they don't fit, I probably won't bring them.

I've recently been working on a project where I shoot 3-5 rolls within a few hours, never removed from their canisters until use, only in one camera. Usually I have no scratches, but for a couple shoot days, one roll would have (minor) scratches while the rest wouldn't. I'm considering the possibility that some particle got on the film in the wash stage and scratched its way down the emulsion as the water dripped off..which would still mean the canisters didn't necessarily do much. While in the zipped plastic bag the cassettes and leaders do rub against each other, I do keep it zipped any time I'm not taking film in or out...I don't think too much dust is introduced. I don't tape the leaders down.

I know it doesn't seem like the canisters are much bigger than the cassettes but it depends on how you travel and what kind of luggage you have. I've found the difference to be significant, even though I went ahead and made space for them on the last couple trips.

Those egg-crate-esque Japan exposures film holders seem cool, but for the way I pack the film into my carryon, they're not practical...I need a more malleable mass of film, as un-structured as possible. But your packing style may be different.

Extra plastic bags are useful on any backpacking trip, whether you're a photographer or not. In my case, I take film from the main stash gallon bag and pop a few rolls into a quart-size bag that goes into my daybag once I get wherever I'm supposed to be. I also separate into multiple gallon bags when a trip has distinct parts so I know which is which when I get home...like last year when I had 4 days at a wedding in Belize and then went to El Salvador for 9 days alone. This time I have 10 days of a family trip to China/Taiwan which I will segue into a solo trip to Indonesia. I want two clearly marked separate bags of film...both to feel safe when I'm running down my mental checklist each time I'm packing up for a new place but also to know what to develop first when I get home :).

perkeleellinen
05-17-2010, 04:12 AM
I use these boxes made by Fuji, they can be got at Japanexposures:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v460/steve-g/62473702.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v460/steve-g/b92a683e.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v460/steve-g/a419a216.jpg

verney
05-17-2010, 05:47 AM
I use these boxes made by Fuji, they can be got at Japanexposures:

Those were actually mentioned on the first page. Where can I get a 120-version of those?

perkeleellinen
05-17-2010, 05:55 AM
Those were actually mentioned on the first page. Where can I get a 120-version of those?


Oops! I should read a bit closer! I've never seen 120 versions.

Thingy
05-17-2010, 08:49 AM
Would any of these containers for biological specimans do? The cocoon boxes might be suitable?

http://www.emsdiasum.com/microscopy/products/preparation/boxes.aspx

Steve

heespharm
05-18-2010, 03:05 PM
I use foil to wrap each cartridge and tape up the seam so it's light tight and moisture tight... Then pack the in plastic zip-loc bags

funkpilz
05-18-2010, 03:26 PM
Use Ziploc bags or those sweet grey Fuji boxes. Those are sort of watertight and pack 10 rolls of film each, pretty tightly as well.

ozphoto
05-18-2010, 11:50 PM
I use old Tupperware containers - squarish ones with a lid. They hold about 15-18 rolls from memory and pack really well. Anytime they show signs of splitting, I get my mum to visit the Tupperware store and get them replaced gratis! :)

Poisson Du Jour
05-19-2010, 12:12 AM
If you're going backpacking anywhere outside the cities e.g. Milford Sound, Haast, Westland, Mount Cook etc., consider protecting everything you have, especially film in canisters, from kea. The parrots can open canisters, rip the film out then move on to the next form of amusement to them, like windscreen wipers/rubber surrounds, packs that look inviting to peck open and even the beloved NZ invention, the thong is not safe. Keep film with you in tent (with food, too) in whatever form of sturdy protection you can dream up and hope for the best!

Craig Swensson
05-19-2010, 12:34 AM
If you're going backpacking anywhere outside the cities e.g. Milford Sound, Haast, Westland, Mount Cook etc., consider protecting everything you have, especially film in canisters, from kea. The parrots can open canisters, rip the film out then move on to the next form of amusement to them, like windscreen wipers/rubber surrounds, packs that look inviting to peck open and even the beloved NZ invention, the thong is not safe. Keep film with you in tent (with food, too) in whatever form of sturdy protection you can dream up and hope for the best!

you might want to explain which thong you mean, just so we don`t get the wrong idea:p
rergards
CW

Poisson Du Jour
05-19-2010, 03:24 AM
LOL!! :p
(the foot thongs people frequently kick-off and absent-mindedly put on their car roof while they go nature-walkabouts...).

Rick A
05-19-2010, 06:05 AM
LOL!! :p
(the foot thongs people frequently kick-off and absent-mindedly put on their car roof while they go nature-walkabouts...).
I believe they are called "flip-flops" here in the states. When I used to back pack, I carried my film in the canisters in zip lock bags, inside strap on accessory bags. These are the soft pouches that attach to the main pack via the slotted leather patches. The ones I had also strapped onto my waist belt and I had a smaller one attached to a shoulder strap that held film for that day, and some other small essentials. I wish I could still go off on pack trips like I used to, 2-3 weeks in the Uintah Mts in NE Utah, or Sawtooths. My aging body cant do that anymore.

P C Headland
05-22-2010, 03:21 PM
Thongs tend to be worn on the mid part of the body in NZ. We wear jandals on our feet, as thongs don't offer any underfoot protection. Jandals worn in the mid part of the body would chaff somewhat....

The xray scanners in AKL and CHCH are fine for film. You'll get to put your bags through the quarantine scanners too - no choice there. Do remember to declare everything - some friends from Sydney came over the other week, with a very expensive mandarine in their bags - a $400 instant fine one!

MattKing
05-22-2010, 09:36 PM
Thongs used to refer to a type of sandal here, but now refer to a type of underwear.

We have a family friend who is an elementary school teacher. One day she was discussing an upcoming school trip to a pool or a beach and without thinking suggested to her young charges that they should bring their thongs (footware). One of the little girls told her that the little girl's mother wouldn't let the little girl wear thongs.

Poisson Du Jour
05-22-2010, 09:47 PM
I have a confession. I haven't worn my pretty fluoro-orange thong since it was exposed to salt water and morphed into a pink one!!
Well, PC, o'er The Ditch we still call those uber-fashionable thing 'thongs', for want of a better turn. Surf shop on the coast nearby has a wall with more than 600 different styles (!). Yes, my Lonely Planet bible says they're called Jandals.

What's this about X-Ray scanners in Quarantine? I never had any Quarantine inspection, X-Ray or otherwise, of my boxes, portmanteaux and bags ("too much stuff", mutters the Customs man under his breath...).

Thingy
05-24-2010, 09:52 AM
In England we call them flip flops, and they are a must for sailors and they move between mess deck and showers. Thongs on the other hand are things strange people wear ;)