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df cardwell
06-29-2010, 05:41 AM
Rollei Portraiture Hints

1. Hints that work for some folks are useless for others !

2. A Rollei is super quiet and truly instantaneous. It is at it's best with emotional intimacy.

3. The square format encourages you to place your subject within a greater context.

4. Today's films are so incredibly good that there is no limit to what you can achieve.

Have fun.

.

markbarendt
06-29-2010, 06:02 AM
I guess I just need to get my ass out of the computer and off into the field :)

That goes for all of us. :D

Ektagraphic
06-29-2010, 10:56 AM
When I develop these photographs to give them to people, when an 8x10 is ordered is is more standard to print the full frame on the 8x10 leaving a boarder around it, crop in the darkroom to fit the page or cut the square out after?

2F/2F
06-29-2010, 04:23 PM
Kee-ripes, man!

IMNSHO, you really need to quit sweating the small stuff, and attack the core of the matter: Learn how to work with light. Learn how to work with people. Learn how to work with your camera/s. Learn how to express yourself with visual language.

It does you no good whatsoever to treat the minute details such as print sizes with as much respect and attention as you are treating them until you can work with light well, work with people well, work with your camera/s well, and gain a good head of steam toward crossing (demolishing?) the line between technique and concept. Being able to do those things is the only thing that will define you as a photographer (and sell your photos).

The things that matter - that really matter most for you - are far more basic that you are making it seem.

So, PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE, and forget anyone else and what they think. That is the key. Have some cajones!!! Barrel through it! Go at it! Screw up! JUST DO IT. The only way you will do OK in your endeavor is to just start practicing and doing what you can with what you have, and letting go of your insecurities about what other people think. FUCK 'EM. Just shoot, and judge, and you will learn most of what you need to learn as far as the technical things go. You will either find your own answers, or you will suck. It's as simple as that. Photography is best learned via experimentation and trial and error...and you have to be OK with sucking to get there.

fotch
06-29-2010, 07:09 PM
Hey, take it easy, he is asking questions, nothing wrong with that.

Uncle Bill
06-29-2010, 07:52 PM
I've shot portraits with a Rolleiflex with a 75 f3.5 lens with great success both indoors and outside.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3496/3887773501_544f058f17_m.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3495/3798232560_1e95feb8c3_m.jpg

markbarendt
06-29-2010, 09:15 PM
When I develop these photographs to give them to people, when an 8x10 is ordered is is more standard to print the full frame on the 8x10 leaving a boarder around it, crop in the darkroom to fit the page or cut the square out after?

When in doubt refer to your post #30

Ektagraphic
06-29-2010, 09:59 PM
2F/2F...That post put a smile on my face :D.....I actually did get some of the family out into the yard this afternoon to experiment and I had a great time. It's a work in progress. :)

benjiboy
06-30-2010, 11:26 AM
Come to think of it many of the Worlds most famous photographers became legends photographing people with Rolleiflexes.

dpurdy
06-30-2010, 11:57 AM
http://www.pyke-eye.com/main

Anyone who subscribes to the New Yorker gets to see occasional new portrait work by Steve Pyke on his old Rollei GX

Richard Jepsen
06-30-2010, 12:21 PM
The square format works great with portraits. Look at Avedon or Penn's work. Both used an 80mm Rollei in the 50s and 60s. Nothing wrong with 3/4 length portraits. Avedon and Penn shot close enough to distort features and it worked for them. Also, 50/60s Rollei glass often gives a certain rounded 3D look which is very interesting.

benjiboy
06-30-2010, 12:34 PM
The square format works great with portraits. Look at Avedon or Penn's work. Both used an 80mm Rollei in the 50s and 60s. Nothing wrong with 3/4 length portraits. Avedon and Penn shot close enough to distort features and it worked for them. Also, 50/60s Rollei glass often gives a certain rounded 3D look which is very interesting. A large part of David Baileys work in the sixties was shot on Rolleiflexes, and he still uses them.