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dugrant153
08-30-2010, 02:47 AM
Hi everyone,

So, I love shooting weddings and events, and I love shooting them indoors.
However, I'm pretty used to using my digital and just racking out whatever ISO I need. With film, this luxury doesn't exist so much.

My question then is... how do you folks "switch film" for weddings? I generally shoot ISO 400 film (working with Kodak Portra 400 and Fuji Pro 400H at the moment) but I've been in situations where I'd need something like 640 ISO to get the shot.

I'd love to get Fuji 800Z but I heard it's been discontinued :(

Curious on what you folks do to compensate? do you have many camera bodies with all kinds of films?

fotch
08-30-2010, 03:29 AM
I usually prepare with some form of bracing the camera for slower shutter speeds. The tripod is the best but sometimes it is as simple as a table and some napkins. Faster speed film usually brings higher grain and is not what I want. Extra bodies with different film is another way, however, for me, its usually B&W in one, color in the other. RF often can be shot as slower shutter speeds since you don't have to have the mirror flapping around. I am sure there are many other ways that work also.

holmburgers
08-30-2010, 01:17 PM
I don't believe that 800z is discontinued, though I'm not certain. Have a look-see...

http://www.apug.org/forums/forum172/71677-fuji-pro-800-z-not-dead.html

If it's still available, buy a ton and FREEZE it ;)

AgentX
08-30-2010, 02:42 PM
You could shoot medium format using a camera with interchangeable backs...but that's unlikely to give you a wide enough lens to shoot available light indoors at a wedding with most setups anyhow.

Best solution would be another camera set up for indoor work, IMHO.

MattKing
08-30-2010, 09:50 PM
Flash :).

Really!

At all the weddings/events that I have shot, flash had at least a small role.

Of course I almost never used 35mm, and my medium format equipment had leaf shutters, making for relatively simple fill flash and "catch light" work.

dugrant153
08-30-2010, 11:30 PM
I've thought of the idea of flash and I've used it extensively before. However, I'm trying to develop a style that doesn't use flash. I'm quite heavily influenced by people like Jeff Ascough and other non-flash (or don't use it often) users.

I'm thinking maybe loading one camera with Kodak Portra 400H and another one with Kodak Portra 800... and then a medium format camera with... hmm... Portra?
(Or Fujifilm equivalents).

Seems like quite a juggling act, I must say.

Oh, I should note that I have Pentax cameras and lenses (FA31, FA77 for lenses, Pentax 645 with 75mm F2.8 for MF). I only have an MZ-60 at the moment. thinking maybe two PZ-1s or MZ-5n's in conjunction with the 645... trying to simplify it as much as I can!

Thomas Bertilsson
08-30-2010, 11:36 PM
How about faster lenses?

I like primes and use a 55mm f/2 most of the time. Trying to lay my hands on a nice 85mm f/1.4 when I can, and a 50 f/1.4 or so. Those extra stops are worth a lot.

And shooting ISO 400 film at 640 isn't going to destroy the picture.

Have fun. I saw your intro too. Welcome to APUG!


I've thought of the idea of flash and I've used it extensively before. However, I'm trying to develop a style that doesn't use flash. I'm quite heavily influenced by people like Jeff Ascough and other non-flash (or don't use it often) users.

I'm thinking maybe loading one camera with Kodak Portra 400H and another one with Kodak Portra 800... and then a medium format camera with... hmm... Portra?
(Or Fujifilm equivalents).

Seems like quite a juggling act, I must say.

Oh, I should note that I have Pentax cameras and lenses (FA31, FA77 for lenses, Pentax 645 with 75mm F2.8 for MF). I only have an MZ-60 at the moment. thinking maybe two PZ-1s or MZ-5n's in conjunction with the 645... trying to simplify it as much as I can!

dugrant153
08-30-2010, 11:38 PM
Thanks :D

Oh, I shoot fast lenses like crazy (and love them like crazy)! FA31 is an F1.8, FA77 is an F1.8, and I have a 50mm F1.7 manual focus lens... and if I can adapt my digital, I have a DA*55 F1.4 waterproof lens.

The only thing with shooting at ISO 640 is that you lose some contrast? I really like shots that have that really 'deep' look to them. (full of color or tone) and I find that when I underexpose it becomes very air and light... almost kind of faded... especially in the shadows!

pentaxuser
08-31-2010, 12:02 PM
Why not get some Fuji Pro 800, do shots which replicate your wedding ones then enlarge to the max size your clients are likely to ask for. If the colours and grain are acceptable then use 800 exclusively. One film, one camera. Much simpler

pentaxuser

dugrant153
09-01-2010, 03:03 AM
do they even make Fuji 800Z anymore? I can't even find it in my local specialized photography stores! Sounds like I'd be digging into the last reserves?

an 800 film (probably shoot it at 640 ISO) would probably do the trick :)

pentaxuser
09-01-2010, 02:23 PM
I have checked a number of U.K. stockists including the Fuji film site itself and there was no sign of Pro 800 but neither was there a notice saying "discontinued". It is still available at one stockist with a stock plenty listing but that stockist may simply have put in a massive order prior to its discontinuation( if this is the case).

It would appear however that Superia 800 is still a product line and 1600. The latter is very fast but gets a bit grainy above 10x8 in my experience.

So a bit of a mystery. There seems to be some evidence that Pro800 may have been discontinued but it is not conclusive.

pentaxuser

pentaxuser
09-01-2010, 02:40 PM
Just a bit of an update. On one of the most reliable of U.K. sites, Agphotographic( run by Matt a subscriber here) there is a notice to the effect that Fuji almost discontinued Fuji Pro 800 in 35mm in 2009 but changed its mind due to customer reaction. However there is no 120 but there is Kodak Portra 800 in both 35mm and 120.

So crisis over

pentaxuser

dugrant153
09-06-2010, 01:40 AM
Since I'm shooting Kodak Portra, that's good news that they're still producing 400 and 800 ISO. Unfortunately, it's all special order here where I love, or atleast I have to find a store that sells it.

eddym
09-06-2010, 10:12 AM
Since I'm shooting Kodak Portra, that's good news that they're still producing 400 and 800 ISO. Unfortunately, it's all special order here where I love, or atleast I have to find a store that sells it.

Do you love where you live, or live where you love?

marco.taje
09-06-2010, 10:49 AM
The only thing with shooting at ISO 640 is that you lose some contrast? I really like shots that have that really 'deep' look to them. (full of color or tone) and I find that when I underexpose it becomes very air and light... almost kind of faded... especially in the shadows!

Pushing film should actually INCREASE contrast. What you observe might be cause by some different placement of luminance levels across the toe region, maybe.. That is, if you push a negative, shadows tend to be more "packed" and have less local contrast. If you or your printer try to raise them to brighter levels, you might end up with muddy shadows, which might be your case.

Just my 2 pennies from the small experience I have. :-)

Ciao
Marco

dugrant153
09-06-2010, 01:08 PM
Thanks for that tip, Marco! Something I have to keep in mind if I ever push/pull film.

Oops! I should've said "where I live". haha. Give me access to Portra 800 and I'll be happy as a clam.

MattKing
09-06-2010, 04:51 PM
I would think that you can find Portra 800 at Beau Photo. Lens and Shutter may have it too. Leos Cameras are a possibility as well. Finally, it would be worth asking at ABC Photocolour too.

dugrant153
09-07-2010, 02:39 AM
Oh yeah yeah. I just checked Beau Photo and they have stock.

Lens and Shutter (the new one Downtown) did not have it nor seem to have access? Leo's I haven't checked.
I'll have to check ABC as well :)

dugrant153
09-12-2010, 02:15 AM
kk... well, I'm starting to get a workflow down.

Here's my question. When there's a lot of changing light throughout the day, how do you setup your cameras and film?

Do you folks stick to a certain film all day and just underexpose or overexpose?

I've been in a lot of churches where 800 ISO would've been best but had a 400 ISO film in the camera and... well, couldn't easily change unless I had another camera.

Curious if you folks load up one camera with one film, and a second camera with another or.... something like that? I'm planning on using two 35mm cameras + 1 medium format (645) camera.

marco.taje
09-12-2010, 03:52 AM
Do you folks stick to a certain film all day and just underexpose or overexpose?

Well, no, I don't think it's supposed to work that way. Under- or overexposure is a function of the development you choose for that roll. That means that you decide to develop that roll to suit a certain brightness range and hence adjust your exposure accordingly. So you can't change these settings within the same roll, from this point of view.

So, one roll ---> one development method ---> one EI.

That said, you may as well use only ONE type of film, and adapt its development and EI as lighting changes. This is also when interchangeable backs really have an edge! I will typically use one film, and if I find I have to cope with different "brightness range" setups at the same time, I will load another back with the same film, but deciding to give different development and EI to the second roll.

If you have the chance to switch backs or cameras, I think that's the way it goes. If you're stuck with one roll at a time, try to find an average development and exposure that will be ok, although not exactly spot on, for what you expect to shoot.