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View Full Version : Flipped lens Brownie Hawkeye



nsurit
08-30-2010, 10:13 AM
I was recently having a conversation with a list member about images made with a flipped lens Brownie Hawkeye and said I would post a couple on examples here. These are negative scans. Bill Barber

JJB
08-30-2010, 11:12 AM
What model did you do this on? I have the flash model and would love to try this. It seems to create the kind of image I wanted my holga to make but was not able to.

nsurit
08-30-2010, 11:24 AM
They made two models (flash or non-flash) of the Hawkeye in the 49-61 series. Either the flash or the non-flash model will work. It is an easy job, just pay attention to how you take it apart. Bill Barber

Ken Nadvornick
08-30-2010, 11:43 AM
It is an easy job, just pay attention to how you take it apart.

Again, this site (http://cclemens.tripod.com/Brownie/HawkClean.htm) will walk you through that process in detail...

Ken

jamesgignac
08-30-2010, 11:50 AM
Really nice - I like this a lot. Thanks for the tip!

jnanian
08-30-2010, 12:21 PM
i like how it is crazy distorted and almost macro at the same time.
beautiful stuff bill !

john

nsurit
08-30-2010, 01:59 PM
Thanks for the comments. I've done two of these and didn't mess with the mirror (didn't take it out.) I just used a q-tip with a little denatured alcohol to clean it. One thing to remember is that this camera was designed for 620 film. That is really no problem as you can use 120, just be sure to use a 620 spool for the take up side. Some folks have talked about respooling 120 to 620 spools. You don't have to do that. If you don't do your own processing, ask your processor to return the 620 spool with your order. The film advance will be a little tight at first, however that soon passes. Bill Barber

mabman
08-30-2010, 02:27 PM
Just curious, what distance range works for the in-focus part of the picture? Nice shots, btw.

nsurit
08-30-2010, 04:40 PM
Both of these are uncropped, so on the first one i was perhaps 8 to 10 feet away from the post with the sign on it and the second one, I was very close (within 2 to 3 feet.) If someone thinks they like the results, this is a no brainer. The cameras, if not sitting around in your grandparents house are less than $10 at auction, yard sale or thrift store. There are always some on eBay. They are simple to work on. The one I'm currently working on had a somewhat sticky shutter. Soaked in a little lighter fuid and 3 in 1 oil mixture and it works like a champ. Bill Barber

michaelbsc
08-30-2010, 04:50 PM
The cameras, if not sitting around in your grandparents house are less than $10 at auction, yard sale or thrift store. There are always some on eBay. They are simple to work on. The one I'm currently working on had a somewhat sticky shutter. Soaked in a little lighter fuid and 3 in 1 oil mixture and it works like a champ. Bill Barber


I've never flipped the lens, but I've had a few apart. The important trick is that screws that hold the light box to the housing are simply screwed into the Bakelite. If you over-torque them they won't stay in because they strip out very easily. I found that once you're sure of your work, take it back apart, and reassemble with a small dab of superglue in the hole. The screws set up very tightly, but if you're sparing with the glue you can still get it apart a few years from now if necessary.

I found the spray graphite worked better than oil to my mind. YMMV.

Valerie
08-31-2010, 10:02 AM
Thanks for posting these, Bill... beautiful!!! (Guess I should get busy and post a few from mine.)

mhcfires
09-18-2010, 01:49 PM
I have a few rolls of VP620 with expiry dates of 1965. I put one through my Hawkeye so that I could have another 620 spool. This frame had some damage to the emulsion, not sure how it got scratched, so I cropped it. Developed in Rodinal 1:50 FOR 10 MIN AT 68F:


Bum at Bus Stop
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4125/4995992113_a9d1747d98_b.jpg