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JimO
11-23-2010, 06:43 PM
i agree w. jesper... wlf just not as threatening, in fact people see it as a novelty.

the best photo tools are eye contact and a smile - before, or after.

keep shooting

JimO
11-23-2010, 06:53 PM
it is ben... the challenge is all about relating to people...

sometimes you relate before you make the picture, sometimes it has to happen afterwards to maintain the spontaneity/creativity... you have to relate.

bvy
11-25-2010, 10:58 PM
5. There are too many street photographers. Adding to that pile of work is like peeing in the ocean.

Absolutely. Shoot flowers or buildings instead. No one does that.

Red Robin
08-31-2011, 04:34 PM
Who said" those willing to give up some freedom to gain security deserve neither" and "if the shoe fits" . .. ... well you know what your wearing.

Worker 11811
08-31-2011, 05:07 PM
Just talk to people.

That doesn't mean you have to ask everybody for permission. Just simply chat with people.

Sit on the park bench and talk about baseball or something. Be polite. Be social and engaging. When people are comfortable with you, it isn't uncommon for them to come up and ask for a picture. Once or twice a week, I'll have people come up to me, hand me their digicams and ask me to take their picture. I always oblige. Then, before the scene breaks up, I quickly snap one with my camera, hand them my business card. I tell them to send me an e-mail and I'll send them a picture. Once the ice is broken, I can take almost any picture I want so long as I'm not an a$$hole about it.

The effect sometimes snowballs. When other people see you talking to other people and taking their picture they'll often come up and ask for their picture taken.

If you get yourself a box of Ilford postcard stock, you can mail the pictures you take to the people who want them.
Use stick-on return address labels with your business logo on them. Postcards make good advertising.
(If people get sketchy about giving out their home address, tell them it's okay to use a business address.)

Bottom line: Don't be that "creepy guy." Be a nice, sociable and professional photographer. People will treat you accordingly.

Newt_on_Swings
08-31-2011, 07:11 PM
Check out this japanese guy who shoots street, totally in your face, and walks off. Not my style, but he does get a few images, most are ehhh though imo.

2:32 mark for massive film dump

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fnh8x_FrnGQ&feature=youtu.be


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K32E2qmg6tE&feature=related

Sirius Glass
08-31-2011, 07:52 PM
For a 35mm camera, Eric sure took a lot of 120 film!

Newt_on_Swings
08-31-2011, 08:17 PM
For a 35mm camera, Eric sure took a lot of 120 film!
I think he shoots with a mamiya 7ii rangefinder with external flash, not positive though :p

Colin Corneau
08-31-2011, 08:35 PM
Check out this japanese guy who shoots street, totally in your face, and walks off. Not my style, but he does get a few images, most are ehhh though imo.

2:32 mark for massive film dump

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fnh8x_FrnGQ&feature=youtu.be


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K32E2qmg6tE&feature=related


This guy just doesn't do it for me. His work is weak and 'success' ratio is surprisingly low for all the film he goes through. Gawd bless him but I don't get that approach...Bruce Gilden did this first and did it better.

Best advice I read here is from JimO --


.. the challenge is all about relating to people...

sometimes you relate before you make the picture, sometimes it has to happen afterwards to maintain the spontaneity/creativity... you have to relate.

ChristopherCoy
08-31-2011, 09:03 PM
I haven't read past the first few posts, but whoever suggested the 'Street Shots' video with Bruce whoever..... THANK YOU! I am LOVING all the street shots episodes that WYNC broadcasts.

freax
09-01-2011, 05:52 PM
I think the best example is this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHtsZLsMlJI. Watch the guy with a M9 saying some joke and a thanks and everyone laughs.

benjiboy
09-04-2011, 09:51 AM
I'm amazed how many people when I shoot street pretend they haven't seen me when I know they have.
, and I suggest with regard to "pissing people off" that you use the smallest camera you can get with the smoothest contours like an Olympus XA so if they take offence and stick it "where the Sun don't shine" it won't be as painful :D

bobwysiwyg
09-04-2011, 10:27 AM
I'm amazed how many people when I shoot street pretend they haven't seen me when I know they have.
, and I suggest with regard to "pissing people off" that you use the smallest camera you can get with the smoothest contours like an Olympus XA so if they take offence and stick it "where the Sun don't shine" it won't be as painful :D

:laugh:

Roger Cole
09-04-2011, 11:54 AM
I'm going to find a rangefinder, grip and cam for my Linhof so I can use it in street shooting. I tend to reverse the intention and do the shoving when someone tries something like that. ;)

Seriously, what little of this I do I REALLY like my Yashica TLR. Some don't recognize it as a camera, those who do mostly think it's a very cool thing, and with the WLF I can often photograph people who have no clue I'm doing it. Those that do don't seem to care.

benjiboy
09-06-2011, 08:45 AM
I'm going to find a rangefinder, grip and cam for my Linhof so I can use it in street shooting. I tend to reverse the intention and do the shoving when someone tries something like that. ;)

Seriously, what little of this I do I REALLY like my Yashica TLR. Some don't recognize it as a camera, those who do mostly think it's a very cool thing, and with the WLF I can often photograph people who have no clue I'm doing it. Those that do don't seem to care.
I like TLRs too Roger because they're quiet and none threatening because you're looking down into the viewfinder and not directly at people you can also point the camera sideways in the opposite direction to the way you are faced and shoot, or even at arms length above your head.

Joe VanCleave
09-06-2011, 08:59 AM
I think the best example is this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHtsZLsMlJI. Watch the guy with a M9 saying some joke and a thanks and everyone laughs.

I'm thinking everyone is laughing in this video because he has a video camera stuck behind the RF viewfinder of the Leica, piggy-back style, as if the video camera is humping the Leica.

It is funny, though. Thanks for sharing.

~Joe

Erik Petersson
09-06-2011, 11:25 AM
I am doing a project where I photograph people in the subway. I love to record their expressions and faces. The camera is a Nikon F3 from which I remove the prism, so that it becomes a waist viewfinder camera. People often do not notice me, even though I sit right across the aisle.

Lately, though, I have found those photos more interesting where I am noticed and people accept that I photograph them.

Have a look at my results, if you like

http://erikpetersson.livejournal.com/

BradleyK
09-06-2011, 01:05 PM
While not my primary photographic interest - that would be either landscape, fine art or industrial work - I do shoot a small amount of "street photography." I have yet to find a non-compliant or aggressive subject. My modus operandi? 1). I dress to blend in: blue jeans or khaki chinos with neutral colors; 2). I keep the equipment simple: an M6 with either a 35mm or 50mm lens - never anything longer; 3). If my "subject" engages in conversation, I always explain WHY I photographed her/him/them (i.e. what I found visually interesting, etc). This I do AFTER I have made my photograph(s) - I do not like posed pictures; and 4). I ALWAYS thank the party or parties involved, either with a nod of the head, a smile or a simple "thank you."
The keys, in my view: 1) Comportment; and 2) My M6s (most see these as toys and do not find them "aggressive" in the same way as SLRs and DSLRs seem to be).

Klainmeister
09-06-2011, 01:42 PM
I am doing a project where I photograph people in the subway. I love to record their expressions and faces. The camera is a Nikon F3 from which I remove the prism, so that it becomes a waist viewfinder camera. People often do not notice me, even though I sit right across the aisle.

Lately, though, I have found those photos more interesting where I am noticed and people accept that I photograph them.

Have a look at my results, if you like

http://erikpetersson.livejournal.com/

Dang, those are quite good! That's some good work, my friend. I didn't even realize you could do that to a Nikon. Great idea!

Erik Petersson
09-06-2011, 01:52 PM
Thanks! The prism is just removed briefly, otherwise stuff would fall out of the camera. The image in the viewfinder is inverted, but you quickly get used to that.