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perkeleellinen
09-06-2011, 03:08 PM
Great photos Erik! I used to have an F3 and remove the prism just like you to take incognito photos when I was in bars with friends.

jeffreyg
09-06-2011, 03:36 PM
Avoid people with guns, knives and gang tattoos. A smile and thumbs up after the shot. The most material is usually in an area of a lot of activity and most people are busy with their own stuff. I don't do too much street photography but have done enough to be comfortable with it. Medium format both waist level and eye level; 50mm and longer lenses.

http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

Erik Petersson
09-06-2011, 03:59 PM
Thanks, Perkeleellinen!

Newt_on_Swings
09-06-2011, 10:00 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRBARi09je8&feature=related

Im not sure if anyone has mentioned it, but here is another example of a very confrontational photographer, Bruce Gilden. He's a Magnum photographer as well, and as he says it, "I have no ethics". LOL interesting watch.

Bateleur
09-07-2011, 03:09 AM
I am doing a project where I photograph people in the subway. I love to record their expressions and faces. The camera is a Nikon F3 from which I remove the prism, so that it becomes a waist viewfinder camera. People often do not notice me, even though I sit right across the aisle.

Lately, though, I have found those photos more interesting where I am noticed and people accept that I photograph them.

Have a look at my results, if you like

http://erikpetersson.livejournal.com/

Yours is a fabulous project with some lovely results, the F3 is ideal as a waist level camera, do you leave the top open, or have some mask or shade around the focus screen?

Erik Petersson
09-07-2011, 03:15 AM
Thanks Bateleur,
I just remove the prism and hold it my right hand. I think it might look like I am fixing something. The wagons are usually dark enough to let me view the image without shade. I know the distance, so no need to focus.

Bateleur
09-07-2011, 08:52 AM
That's a great idea Erik, and your results show it's effectiveness

Jim Noel
09-07-2011, 10:56 AM
Get a twin lens reflex camera which most people today don't recognize. It can be used facing to the side.
Another choice is a Robot which is a 35 mm camera with a viewfinder built into one end so it can be aimed 90 deg. from where you are facing.

MattKing
09-07-2011, 12:19 PM
I liked all the shots.

They are one of the best examples I've seen in a while of what I have seen referred to as the "naval eye view of the world".

They bring home to me how important "viewpoint" can be to photography.

Erik Petersson
09-07-2011, 05:11 PM
Yes, many of the photos were made at navel level. I think i might upload these pictures to APUG.

I posted them because I wanted to show that you sometimes are not noticed although you sit only a couple of meters from the one you photograph. Strange, but true. Bruce Gilden says something similar in the video above.

Newt_on_Swings
09-07-2011, 06:44 PM
Nikon also makes a waist level viewfinder for the F3, as well as a 6x eyepiece which could be a help to you too. but they are always over priced online. Ive done train photography before as well, and the noise of it really helps with the shutter click for shots as close as these are.

swchris
09-07-2011, 06:50 PM
I just remove the prism and hold it my right hand.

So you play around with the camera with your left hand and "accidentally" hit the trigger?

What lens (focal length) are you using?

Nice pictures!

chris

Erik Petersson
09-08-2011, 12:12 AM
So you play around with the camera with your left hand and "accidentally" hit the trigger?

What lens (focal length) are you using?

Nice pictures!

chris

Yes, kind of, but more often with one of the fingers on my right hand. I use the 50mm series E, f1.8. It is the smallest lens I have, easy to carry around. Occasionally Nikkor 50mm f.1.4.

benjiboy
09-08-2011, 06:59 AM
I find with an eye level camera a useful technique to learn while shooting "street" is standing sideways to your subject so you are pointed in the opposite direction to them, and holding the camera to your ear,to fire the shutter not your eye, the failure rate at first is quite high, but they think you are listening to the shutter firing and never suspect they are being photographed. :whistling:

Erik Petersson
09-08-2011, 07:07 AM
I find with an eye level camera a useful technique to learn while shooting "street" is standing sideways to your subject so you are pointed in the opposite direction to them, and holding the camera to your ear,to fire the shutter not your eye, the failure rate at first is quite high, but they think you are listening to the shutter firing and never suspect they are being photographed. :whistling:

Can you see what you photograph?

benjiboy
09-08-2011, 09:58 AM
Can you see what you photograph?

At the actual time you take picture no, but but with practice the ratio of successful exposures improves .

Newt_on_Swings
09-08-2011, 05:22 PM
I find with an eye level camera a useful technique to learn while shooting "street" is standing sideways to your subject so you are pointed in the opposite direction to them, and holding the camera to your ear,to fire the shutter not your eye, the failure rate at first is quite high, but they think you are listening to the shutter firing and never suspect they are being photographed. :whistling:

I usually just zone focus distances, and shoot from where it hangs on my neck. after awhile you learn the approximate boundaries of your lens, and can level the camera. by tugging down on the neck strap for resistance, and holding it to chest, and holding breath, you can get very slow speed shots easily. very easy, very good results.

dfoo
09-16-2011, 05:46 AM
Yes, many of the photos were made at navel level. I think i might upload these pictures to APUG.

I posted them because I wanted to show that you sometimes are not noticed although you sit only a couple of meters from the one you photograph. Strange, but true. Bruce Gilden says something similar in the video above.

http://pics.livejournal.com/erikpetersson/pic/0006yc10/

That is a great image. Excellent results!

Erik Petersson
09-16-2011, 06:22 AM
Thanks a lot dfoo!
A opened a separate thread in which I ask for critique of my photos. I will be grateful for any suggestions and opinions. :)

http://www.apug.org/forums/forum288/96127-moscow-subway-portraits.html

Axle
09-22-2011, 03:14 PM
Whenever I go out and shoot on the street, I just go around, usually use a 50 or 105 lens, and yeah, sometimes people are open to it, and sometimes they aren't It doesn't bother me, I have yet to get hit or yelled at, just glares. Which often adds to the photo.

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6077/6113133583_5282639e65_z.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/axle81401/6113133583/)