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dehk
09-08-2010, 11:01 PM
Read and tried enough things here and there. Tell me how do you take photos of complete strangers on the street without pissing people off, or how to blend in a way that they don't even notice you. Especially using a wider angle lens. For me, 8 out of 10 times I'll get the cold stare, or, they have that look in the eye which I know if I take a photo of them they're gonna go crazy on you. So my question is, how do you stick a camera in someones face without them picking a fight with you?

Sirius Glass
09-08-2010, 11:18 PM
Switch to landscape and architectural photography.

dehk
09-08-2010, 11:23 PM
Switch to landscape and architectural photography.


Nah, got bored with landscape that's why I'm picking fights with people on the street nowadays apparently. I don't know how many people it takes to take me down, but i do know how many they're gonna use.

andrewkirkby
09-08-2010, 11:23 PM
A) small camera
B) don't think about what people think.

David William White
09-08-2010, 11:29 PM
Lots here on that and ethics thereof. Briefly, wide angle is obviously easier. But you can 'get permission' by making eye contact and moving your trigger finger up and down and 'ask' silently. Or like Winogrand, be ready, shoot fast & keep moving so they don't know or aren't sure it ever happened. Self-timer can be helpful, too. Or you can approach, tell them what you see, and enlist their help. All depends on the circumstances and how much of a people-person you are.

dehk
09-08-2010, 11:29 PM
A) small camera
B) don't think about what people think.

Good point, smaller camera does help i noticed. People react less to my Olympus Pen than my SLRs on the street.

Sometimes I can't help to think about what people think. For example if i am going to photograph a bum on the street, I can't help but to think what he'll do, "is he crazy enough to get mad and chase me down the street?" haha. Or better yet, when I'm in the hood.

Adam Podstawczyński
09-08-2010, 11:30 PM
Read and tried enough things here and there. Tell me how do you take photos of complete strangers on the street without pissing people off, or how to blend in a way that they don't even notice you. Especially using a wider angle lens. For me, 8 out of 10 times I'll get the cold stare, or, they have that look in the eye which I know if I take a photo of them they're gonna go crazy on you. So my question is, how do you stick a camera in someones face without them picking a fight with you?


Just don't do that. Don't walk around shooting people without asking. Random street shooters are perceived as obnoxious and inconsiderate people by most, and there is a reason to that. If you want to capture their faces looking at yourself this way, go ahead -- why bother not to piss them off?

dehk
09-08-2010, 11:31 PM
Lots here on that and ethics thereof. Briefly, wide angle is obviously easier. But you can 'get permission' by making eye contact and moving your trigger finger up and down and 'ask' silently. Or like Winogrand, be ready, shoot fast & keep moving so they don't know or aren't sure it ever happened. Self-timer can be helpful, too. Or you can approach, tell them what you see, and enlist their help. All depends on the circumstances and how much of a people-person you are.

I really like the idea of making eye contact and moving my trigger finger up and down and ask silently. That I will try, Thank You.

dehk
09-08-2010, 11:41 PM
Just don't do that. Don't walk around shooting people without asking. Random street shooters are perceived as obnoxious and inconsiderate people by most, and there is a reason to that. If you want to capture their faces looking at yourself this way, go ahead -- why bother not to piss them off?

Yes i do understand when you say "Random street shooters are perceived as obnoxious and inconsiderate people by most". I guess if i didn't state my point clearly, my point is to capture people naturally without them giving me the cold look. That's why I'm trying to gather thoughts on this subject and maybe able to 'appear' less obnoxious.

andrewkirkby
09-08-2010, 11:45 PM
It depends on what you are trying to capture at the end of the day. Often if you are photographing a split second of expression that can't be duplicated in a posed photo you don't have a choice.

If you're taking a photo of a bum as you so eloquently put it- speak to them, find out why they are there- connect with your subject and then capture the emotion as you notice it.

If you are taking pictures of people on the street you are bound to get people fired up. Search YouTube for street shots Bruce Gilden. You will see what I mean.

dehk
09-09-2010, 12:01 AM
It depends on what you are trying to capture at the end of the day. Often if you are photographing a split second of expression that can't be duplicated in a posed photo you don't have a choice.

If you're taking a photo of a bum as you so eloquently put it- speak to them, find out why they are there- connect with your subject and then capture the emotion as you notice it.

If you are taking pictures of people on the street you are bound to get people fired up. Search YouTube for street shots Bruce Gilden. You will see what I mean.

Bruce Gilden, That was really interesting. Don't think I'll ever do what he does. I mean being a photographer myself if he come up and does that to me with a flash on the street even myself will punch him in his face, haha... Interesting character.

Adam Podstawczyński
09-09-2010, 12:04 AM
Yes i do understand when you say "Random street shooters are perceived as obnoxious and inconsiderate people by most". I guess if i didn't state my point clearly, my point is to capture people naturally without them giving me the cold look. That's why I'm trying to gather thoughts on this subject and maybe able to 'appear' less obnoxious.

Oh, I see. You mean you want to walk around in the street shooting people and pretending you are not there. The ideal solution would be to have an invisibility cloak, but that's future. More practical solution for today is to disguise as a walking advertisement, make a hole in one or both boards, and stick the lens through the hole.

I'm being sarcastic only because I don't get the point of photographing people in a way they don't notice you. Golden days of voyeuristic photography are gone, and remember that photography is interaction, not action. You are shooting people, not game.

dehk
09-09-2010, 12:10 AM
Oh, I see. You mean you want to walk around in the street shooting people and pretending you are not there. The ideal solution would be to have an invisibility cloak, but that's future. More practical solution for today is to disguise as a walking advertisement, make a hole in one or both boards, and stick the lens through the hole.

I'm being sarcastic only because I don't get the point of photographing people in a way they don't notice you. Golden days of voyeuristic photography are gone, and remember that photography is interaction, not action. You are shooting people, not game.


Got it :)

Ken Nadvornick
09-09-2010, 12:18 AM
You might try this.

Select a very quiet camera with a wide angle lens. One with a leaf shutter works great. Attach a neck strap to the camera. Set the hyperfocal distance on the lens. Note the minimum distance. Hang the camera around your neck. Attach an air bulb shutter release. Run the air hose behind the camera and under and through your clothing into a jacket or sweater pocket. Set the shutter. Stick your hands into your pockets. Casually walk around in public maintaining at least the noted minimum distance from any potential subjects. When you find something interesting, mentally compose the frame by turning your entire body. Then look away just before you squeeze the bulb. Casually exit the scene and rewind.

I've done this with both a Canonet QL17 G-III and a Yashica MAT-124G TLR. Both have leaf shutters. Never had a single confrontation as not a single subject was ever aware they had been photographed. Even up close.

A side benefit of the TLR is that almost every photo has the subject looking directly into the lens. Not because they suspected. Rather because they had never before seen a TLR and were staring at it. Nice.

Ken

Ken Nadvornick
09-09-2010, 12:25 AM
I'm being sarcastic only because I don't get the point of photographing people in a way they don't notice you.

Depends, I suppose. I tend to seek out people who don't know I'm photographing them. I absolutely don't want the individuals to inject my presence into their reactions. That ruins everything for me.

YMMV, of course.

This also does place a tremendous ethical responsibility on me to never intentionally depict someone in a bad or compromising context. As a practical matter it also normally precludes obtaining model releases. But I do this only as an avocation, so that doesn't come into play for me.

Ken

faustotesta
09-09-2010, 12:28 AM
Sometimes i try this.
I focus a part that is above the subject and start looking at it.
When the subject looks at my camera undertsands that i want to take a picture to something else.
Keep your eye attached to the camera; wait the moment your subject is not concentrated on you and fire. It works

benjiboy
09-09-2010, 02:17 AM
Just don't do that. Don't walk around shooting people without asking. Random street shooters are perceived as obnoxious and inconsiderate people by most, and there is a reason to that. If you want to capture their faces looking at yourself this way, go ahead -- why bother not to piss them off? If you ask them it's pointless because it's no longer candid the whole point of street shooting is to capture people unaware going about their normal lives, once they notice you and they start posing you've blown it.

neilpcraven
09-09-2010, 02:27 AM
Or just a really long lens?

Adam Podstawczyński
09-09-2010, 02:32 AM
If you ask them it's pointless because it's no longer candid the whole point of street shooting is to capture people unaware going about their normal lives, once they notice you and they start posing you've blown it.

You've blown it, or you've nailed it, depending on what you're after.

Steve Smith
09-09-2010, 03:00 AM
Try pointing in a different direction and use this: http://www.camerafilters.com/pages/rightanglelenses.aspx


Steve.