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Mustafa Umut Sarac
01-06-2011, 11:03 PM
Andrey Tarkovsky is one of the best cinema directors and He was writing about the compositions of Vittore Carpaccio 15th century.
I found his pictures at http://www.abcgallery.com

and his one of pictures from 1494 are very interesting. It is anamorphic and 4 meters wide.

http://www.abcgallery.com/C/carpaccio/carpaccio41.html

Is there a lens for ultra large format which will be able to give this picture or rails are enough ?

Best ,

Mustafa Umut Sarac

Istanbul

Mustafa Umut Sarac
01-06-2011, 11:11 PM
http://www.abcgallery.com/C/carpaccio/carpaccio7.html

This paintings perspective is wonderful and modern.

Q.G.
01-07-2011, 07:16 AM
That image is neither the whole picture (http://www.vittorecarpaccio.org/The-Healing-of-the-Madman-c.-1496-large.html) nor anamorphic, Mustafa.

Mustafa Umut Sarac
01-07-2011, 08:07 AM
In his sketch (fig. 2) for the composition (fig. 3), Vittore Carpaccio
(1450–1526) consistently used constructive linear frontal perspective.
However, in the painting itself, in some architectural elements (such
as balconies with brackets, the porch with columns, eaves on the side)
he used parallel bearing not converging towards the vanishing point.
Had it not been represented as a rhomboid, the balcony would appear
small, malformed, insufficiently clear. Also, the line that links the
columns with the terrain, which does not lead to the vanishing point
but is almost parallel to the horizon, stabilizes the composition and,
simultaneously, intensifies the reality of the representation.

Can anyone explain ?

Q.G.
01-07-2011, 12:23 PM
Yup.

There isn't just one vanishing point. Not in real life. And not in (good) paintings.
Paintings are less 'prone' to correct perspective anyway.

But what (i'm sure you have - a very concocted - one) is your explanation?