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samuelingram
04-19-2011, 09:55 AM
I'm looking for a sharp, fine grain film, with good detail in the blacks. One that will get good results with basic processing methods.

I'm looking at Ilford HP5 Plus 125, but have no experience with Ilford films so I'm reluctant to buy some.

Any recommendations?

Jeff Kubach
04-19-2011, 09:58 AM
You might try Ilford Pan F (50asa/ifo).

Jeff

c6h6o3
04-19-2011, 10:02 AM
I'm looking for a sharp, fine grain film, with good detail in the blacks. One that will get good results with basic processing methods.

I'm looking at Ilford HP5 Plus 125, but have no experience with Ilford films so I'm reluctant to buy some.

Any recommendations?

What format? Pan F is not made in sheet film.

Ian C
04-19-2011, 10:09 AM
Kodak T-Max 100 is one of the sharpest films around. Iíve experimented with new films as they come into the market. This has the best combination of speed, sharpness, smooth tonal scale and great enlargability. It has become the only B&W film I use in 35mm, 120, 4" x 5", and 8" x 10".

It can be processed in any B&W developer, but is particularly suitable for development in Kodak T-Max developer. Thatís a good combination because T-Max Developer is a liquid concentrate making it particularly easy to use. You can easily mix just enough to develop a small number of films. Thereís not need to mix the entire bottle of concentrate.

Keith Tapscott.
04-19-2011, 10:17 AM
I'm looking for a sharp, fine grain film, with good detail in the blacks. One that will get good results with basic processing methods.

I'm looking at Ilford HP5 Plus 125, but have no experience with Ilford films so I'm reluctant to buy some.

Any recommendations?HP5 Plus is an ISO 400 film. FP4 Plus is Ilford's ISO 125 film and it is very good as are most films in the ISO 100-125 speed group.

c6h6o3
04-19-2011, 10:21 AM
For 35mm or 120 I would have to vote for Pan F+.

tkamiya
04-19-2011, 10:30 AM
Another vote for Tmax-100. It's a film with fine grain, sharp, and good contrast.

David William White
04-19-2011, 10:32 AM
Irresponsible Suggestion: If you really need to go to the wall, look for some B/W duplicating film. Really slow, most varieties not panchromatic, but astounding. Last year I was shooting often with some Eastman Intermediate film (it was pan), and I enlarged 35mm to 16x20 with no visible grain. I developed it in both D-76 and Technidol, but any differences were lost on me, so I'm sure just about any developer would work.

pgomena
04-19-2011, 10:45 AM
Fuji 100 Acros, T-Max 100, Pan-F+, Ilford Delta 100. All sharp and fine-grained. HP5+, Tri-X, faster, not so fine-grained. T-Max 400, Ilford Delta 400, both fast, sharp, finer grain than the older-technology HP5+ and Tri-X. All are influenced by developer choice, development method and exposure. Take your pick!

Peter Gomena

totalamateur
04-19-2011, 11:03 AM
Try a broken dry plate.

Sorry, couldn't resist.

Vaughn
04-19-2011, 11:06 AM
It will also depend on the sharpness of one's technique and equipment...;)

Vaughn

Ektagraphic
04-19-2011, 11:17 AM
You can't really go wrong with most of Kodak's flavors. I would give Plus-X 125 a try. Great, great film

semeuse
04-19-2011, 11:24 AM
I like the Adox CHS25 and ORT25 for sharpness and detail. I also like the Ilford PanF.

Роберт
04-19-2011, 12:02 PM
Any Ortho 25 film in a high acutance developer like Rodinal, Efke 25 in Beutler A+B or FX-1 or a Copex (Agfa Gevaert) micro film (like Rollei ATP-1.1) in a suitable micro film developer like ATP-DC or SPUR Modular UR.

You will have the finest grain and when having a suitable exposure with these developers extreme high sharpness and acutance. All above films are available in 35mm and 120 roll film.

Not one iso 100 film will give you these features.

Michael R 1974
04-19-2011, 03:35 PM
All things being equal in developer choice, processing etc, in 35mm TMAX 100 will give you the best balance of tonal scale, contrast manageability, speed, grain and sharpness. And I say that without a bias toward Kodak (although I am equally biased toward Kodak, Ilford and Fuji over other brands). TMAX is finer grained than all the 50, 100 or 125 speed films out there at this point, the closest matches in graininess being Pan F+ and Fuji Acros. It is only marginally less sharp than Pan F+, but faster, and with an easier tonal scale to manage, particularly with long scale subjects.

JCJackson
04-19-2011, 03:49 PM
Although it is a special animal, nothing touches ADOX CMS 20 for grainless sharpness. To achieve best tonal scale, acutance and full emulsion speed, you should use their proprietary developer. It is still stupendously slow. But I have enlarged these negatives to 16 x 20 and have had a hard time seeing any grain in the grain magnifier. It is simply astonishing in what you can get in a 35mm negative, but you will need a tripod and a very sharp lens to realize the full potential of this stuff.

Thomas Bertilsson
04-19-2011, 03:53 PM
Sharpness: Kodak TMax 100 / Fuji Neopan Acros / Ilford Delta 100

They are capable of about 100 - 120 line pairs per millimeter of resolution at an exposure index of 100.

400 speed film: Ilford Delta 400 and Kodak TMax 400 are in a league of their own with about 70-80 lp/mm. That's actually better than Plus-X and FP4+.

When you start to make larger prints from these films, at about 16x or more, you will discover that all of the fabricated grain films have more detail. I actually get more sharp detail with 35mm Ilford Delta 3200 developed in Rodinal, at 16x20" print size, than I get from Ilford FP4+. Believe it or not, I am seeing just that.


- Thomas

Jim Noel
04-19-2011, 04:17 PM
No film will give you good detail in the shadows if it is under-exposed. You will not have the finest detail w/o grain if your development is not correct.
Don't rely on the manufacturer, or asking people on this or any other forum. Whichever film you choose, and you have received some very good suggestions, do your own testing for exposure index and development time in your chosen developer.

Ronald Moravec
04-19-2011, 04:36 PM
Kodak T Max100 for the same reasons stated above. I use D76 1:1 that I mix from raw chemicals a liter at a time. Xtol is also good. T Max is a push developer that gave me grainny but sharp results with really high midtone contrast. Works well in Rodinal like all low speed films. I just find D76 is a nice balanced developer, speed, grain, sharpness. Most developers give up two in favor of one.

My second choice would be Ilford Delta 100. Never used Across, but Fuji may be exiting film and I will not hitch my wagon to them.

semeuse
04-20-2011, 08:04 AM
Although it is a special animal, nothing touches ADOX CMS 20 for grainless sharpness.

I love this stuff, but since the OP requested no special chemistry I left it off my recommendation. I find it also works very well in Formulary TD3.