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View Full Version : Selecting a glue to stick enlarger bellows to metal base.



john_s
08-03-2011, 06:13 PM
I recently had to open bellows on my old Beseler 4x5 just about fullly open for the first time ever in order to do some tiny prints. The bellows came away from the upper metal frame, to which it had been originally glued.

I was planning to use some ordinary supermarket contact adhesive but was wondering if there's something better.

Any suggestions?

Photo Engineer
08-03-2011, 06:22 PM
Walther's GOO.

Put a dab on each part and smear out and let dry for a few seconds, then contact the two parts and compress for about 1 day. This stuff is quite good. It will damage things if you get it on places you don't want it, due to the difficulty in removing unwanted glue. I use a toothpick to apply it, or a flattened wood spatula.

If you want super hard adhesion and drying a drop of Superglue on one of the parts before joining turns this into an instant set material, but if you miss your "join" you are SOL. You don't get a second chance.

PE

Rick A
08-03-2011, 06:31 PM
I've always used Pliobond for replacing bellows on enlargers. Place a thin film on each surface to be joined and let set until tacky then join. I also use appropriate sized plastic spring clamps to assist until fully set.

Added: Make sure to clean both mating surfaces thoroughly before gluing.

Existing Light
08-03-2011, 06:34 PM
Any suggestions?


It's a goner. Luckily I collect things that dont work. Send it to me and get a new one :D

michaelbsc
08-03-2011, 08:00 PM
It's a goner. Luckily I collect things that dont work. Send it to me and get a new one :D

No, no. He has ulterior motives.

I, on the other hand, am a bona fide altruist. Send it to me instead. I will dispose of it properly for you. Trust me. :evilgrin.

ic-racer
08-03-2011, 08:41 PM
Once it is glued back together you can try a shorter focal length lens. At 1:1 a lens has twice the covering power as infinity. A 50mm lens should cover a 6x6cm negative at 1:1 reproduction and thereabouts.

Monito
08-03-2011, 09:15 PM
I used household cement on a Beseler 23C II. It seemed to work well and then, not long after, I got a second, better copy of the enlarger, moved a few parts over, and put it away.

ROL
08-03-2011, 10:42 PM
I'm using E-6000 (http://www.eclecticproducts.com/e6000_retail.htm) for projects as varied as bellows repair to fix it jobs like sticking shower door magnet closure back to glass. Comes in clear and assorted colors. Amazing stuff.

paul ron
08-03-2011, 11:01 PM
No, no. He has ulterior motives.

I, on the other hand, am a bona fide altruist. Send it to me instead. I will dispose of it properly for you. Trust me. :evilgrin.

NO NO NO NO!

It has to be disposed of as Toxic waste in a special hermetically sealed container then burried in a salt repository waste facility, which I have access to, as well as obtain the proper government issued permits. :whistling:

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Everyone of these as recomended above, Shoe goo, dabs of contact cement, silicone, plibond, thin foam double sided tape; are all good adhesives, choose one?

BTW 6x6 should be done with a 75mm lens on the enlarger.

.

lacavol
08-04-2011, 05:43 AM
I concur with the E-6000 just don't use too much as it creeps a bit while setting. It is rather permanent as I have some things I glued over 10 years ago that never came loose.

Ian Grant
08-04-2011, 06:14 AM
I recently had to open bellows on my old Beseler 4x5 just about fullly open for the first time ever in order to do some tiny prints. The bellows came away from the upper metal frame, to which it had been originally glued.

I was planning to use some ordinary supermarket contact adhesive but was wondering if there's something better.

Any suggestions?


A contact adhesive is fine but don't use an ordinary household glue. Most OEM bellows (since WWII) use Evostick or equivatlent to glue them to the frames.

Ian

Ian C
08-04-2011, 10:45 AM
The Beseler 8038 3¼” extended lens cone fits both the 23C and 45M series enlargers. This allows smaller than usual prints by placing the lens far enough from the negative to focus.

If you can’t find the extended cone you could make one. The main plate is simply a sheet of aluminum 1/8” x 4” x 4”.

You’d have to fabricate an extension to fit the plate that doesn’t interfere with the receiver at the bottom of the bellows.

As Post #6 suggests, a shorter lens (within reason) will fully cover the negative if the print size you want places the lens far enough from the negative.

john_s
09-07-2011, 10:58 PM
Thanks to all for their suggestions. I used what was locally available (E-6000) and it sure has stuck well. Thanks also for the suggestions about different focal lengths and cone lens boards, but the problem was fundamentally that old glue had lost flexibility since around 1970 (I seem to have lost flexibility too since that time).

Stephen Prunier
09-22-2011, 03:05 PM
I finally purchased my first enlarger today!!! It's a Beseler 23 C II in almost perfect condition. Now that it's home and I'm playing with it, I noticed I have the same problem as the OP :(

But after doing a search and seeing that it sounds like a common condition I now feel like it's nothing to worry about and I'm not freaking out :)

I picked up the enlarger with a 50mm lens and neg. holder, a Time-O-Lite M-59, a 5"x7" Premier safe-light, and a canister style one. I paid $125. I feel I got a nice deal, and I'm itching to get the few other things needed to get started.

paul ron
09-22-2011, 04:49 PM
You got a great deal on that Beseler. Check out the thread on aligning it using a laser level....
http://www.apug.org/forums/forum43/96135-my-alignment-procedure.html

and here is a link to another Bessler site that talks about mods n alignment...
http://www.conradhoffman.com/beseler01.htm

Alignment is everything no matter what enlarger you own.

.