PDA

View Full Version : Contemporary Landscape photography?



Pages : 1 [2] 3

batwister
10-24-2011, 01:34 PM
David Ward - http://www.into-the-light.com/

An absolute visionary in my mind and leagues ahead of nearly every other landscape photographer working (again, in my opinion).
If I meet any naysayers of photography as an art form, David Ward's work is often the first port of call.
His photographs might not strike you straight away, but take a little time to absorb the images in his gallery.
Simple, beautiful work. You'll learn a lot from his blog too, which often attracts the input of academics and mathematicians!
Enlightening reading on our art form and it has really paved the way for my thinking and practice.
I dare say the best landscape photography teacher since Minor White.


Paul Wakefield - http://www.paulwakefield.co.uk/

Just stunning work. Nothing more to be said.


Andrew Nadolski - http://www.nadolski.com

He hasn't produced any other notable work since 2005, but his 'End of the Land' series is a high benchmark in contemporary landscape photography.
I have the book and can tell you it's well worth purchasing - that is, if you're interested in landscape photography as an expressive art form.



You might also benefit from subscribing to LandscapeGB - http://www.landscapegb.com. Perhaps concentrated a little too much on the technical, but I've made a few discoveries from the mag and I consider myself fairly well informed in regards to the landscape 'scene'.

As someone else mentioned; John Blakemore. He is the father of fine art landscape photography in Britain (although working in relative obscurity) and his retrospective has recently been published.
A good starting point and he is still working, to the best of my knowledge.

Apposite to what others have said, the 'imitate, assimilate, innovate' idea is something I live by.
Currently working on innovation!

Jeff Kubach
10-24-2011, 02:35 PM
I agree with Travis about Tim Rudman.

Jeff

olleorama
10-24-2011, 02:59 PM
Tim Parkin. Great blog too, although not updated for a while. Isn't he a member here? His site is www.timparkin.co.uk

batwister
10-24-2011, 05:34 PM
Tim Parkin is the editor and creator of LandscapeGB magazine too, alongside Joe Cornish. Tim isn't recognised for his photography, more his sharing of knowledge through his blog and now LandscapeGB. Certainly an influential figure in the new large format 'movement' in the UK, but more of a techie than photographer.

rolleiman
10-27-2011, 03:22 PM
Although of a former generation, the black & white work of Bill Brandt is worth a look. Not entirely just a landscape photographer, but what he did was original.

It occurs to me, that in this digital age, with everyone wanting to rush around shooting at 10 frames a second, originality and actally taking time to think about what you're doing is somewhat out of fashion.

Ironically you may have to go back a couple of generations to find the best "contemporary" photographers!

MamiyaJen
02-22-2012, 01:43 PM
Although i'm grateful for everyone's suggestions, it's not reallywhat i'm after. Have a look at Shane Lynam's work. That's the sort of thing I'm talking about.

http://www.shanelynamphoto.com/

MDR
02-22-2012, 02:04 PM
Gursky (some work) comes to mind, Robert Adams (mens impact on the landscape in BW), Walter Niedermayr (mountain landscape :-)), Peter Bialobrzeski (Paradise now series), Olivo Barbieri (Cityscapes), Anne Lass (at the crossroad between city and landscape), Andrew Phelps (Urban and classic landscape). All except for Robert Adams are color photographers and quiet good imho.

Dominik

ajmiller
02-22-2012, 02:38 PM
For American cultural landscape see Jeff Brouws (http://www.jeffbrouws.com/)
For Uk landscape, contemporary, abstract see Chris Friel (http://www.chrisfriel.co.uk/photos)
You could also lose a bit of time at J Colberg's Conscientious (http://jmcolberg.com/weblog/) which I'm sure you're aware of?

cheers, Tony

Thomas Bertilsson
02-22-2012, 03:59 PM
Re: earlier comments in this thread about looking at other artists' work.

My recommendation is to let other artists INSPIRE you to do great things. If their work does not inspire you, then perhaps you should continue your research, but remember anyway, because the work that doesn't set off your creative juices can teach you something too!

To draw a social parallel - how do you form opinions of things? How do you learn in school? You talk to other people, read books they wrote, or listen to them speak, and then you combine those thoughts with what's in your own experience. Sometimes other people tell you something so profound that it alters the way you think. Other times not so much, but it still helps you gain perspective into other people's lives and develop empathy.

Now apply that to photography, or any other art form - I'm sure it could only be good to look at the work of others, whether it inspires you or not. But the idea is to learn from others, learn how to see things you perhaps otherwise would have missed, and you shouldn't be worried about 'copying' because it's all filtered through your mind and your process anyway. Even if you tried to recreate the work of someone else, you could not, so relax, enjoy the view, and learn as much as you can about seeing, printing, presentation, framing, gesture, etc.

- Thomas

MamiyaJen
02-22-2012, 05:43 PM
For American cultural landscape see Jeff Brouws (http://www.jeffbrouws.com/)
For Uk landscape, contemporary, abstract see Chris Friel (http://www.chrisfriel.co.uk/photos)
You could also lose a bit of time at J Colberg's Conscientious (http://jmcolberg.com/weblog/) which I'm sure you're aware of?

cheers, Tony

Jeff Brouws is great stuff! Thanks for him. Chris Friel i know of but i'm not altogether keen on his work. And i'd never heard of Conscientious before you said but i'll certainly have a look!

MamiyaJen
02-22-2012, 05:54 PM
Re: earlier comments in this thread about looking at other artists' work.

My recommendation is to let other artists INSPIRE you to do great things. If their work does not inspire you, then perhaps you should continue your research, but remember anyway, because the work that doesn't set off your creative juices can teach you something too!

To draw a social parallel - how do you form opinions of things? How do you learn in school? You talk to other people, read books they wrote, or listen to them speak, and then you combine those thoughts with what's in your own experience. Sometimes other people tell you something so profound that it alters the way you think. Other times not so much, but it still helps you gain perspective into other people's lives and develop empathy.

Now apply that to photography, or any other art form - I'm sure it could only be good to look at the work of others, whether it inspires you or not. But the idea is to learn from others, learn how to see things you perhaps otherwise would have missed, and you shouldn't be worried about 'copying' because it's all filtered through your mind and your process anyway. Even if you tried to recreate the work of someone else, you could not, so relax, enjoy the view, and learn as much as you can about seeing, printing, presentation, framing, gesture, etc.

- Thomas

I think we'll have to disagree here. I can honestly say that when i look at photography that doesn't interest me, i take nothing from it. I have a very short attention span so something has to grab me, if it doesn't i don't bother wasting my time going back to it. Take Shane Lynam for example, he started following me on tumblr, i followed back, i looked at his site and his flickr and there hasn't been a day go by since that i haven't looked at his work. Something has to grab me like that.

As for copying other's work, i never even attempt that anymore. Shirley Baker once said that everytime she attempted to copy another photographer's style, she failed. I've been there and done that and learned my lesson long ago. I just love to sit and look at photographs that interest and inspire me.

Thomas Bertilsson
02-22-2012, 06:26 PM
I think we'll have to disagree here. I can honestly say that when i look at photography that doesn't interest me, i take nothing from it. I have a very short attention span so something has to grab me, if it doesn't i don't bother wasting my time going back to it. Take Shane Lynam for example, he started following me on tumblr, i followed back, i looked at his site and his flickr and there hasn't been a day go by since that i haven't looked at his work. Something has to grab me like that.

As for copying other's work, i never even attempt that anymore. Shirley Baker once said that everytime she attempted to copy another photographer's style, she failed. I've been there and done that and learned my lesson long ago. I just love to sit and look at photographs that interest and inspire me.

Ehrm... I'm saying pretty much what you're saying. You say you love to look at other photographers' work that grab you. Isn't that what I recommended?

Carry on... :)

MamiyaJen
02-22-2012, 07:42 PM
Ehrm... I'm saying pretty much what you're saying. You say you love to look at other photographers' work that grab you. Isn't that what I recommended?

Carry on... :)

You said i should still look at work that doesn't really interest me because i might still take something from it, and i disagreed. At least i think that's what you said...haha

Thomas Bertilsson
02-23-2012, 12:03 AM
You said i should still look at work that doesn't really interest me because i might still take something from it, and i disagreed. At least i think that's what you said...haha

OK. I see what you mean. It's so difficult to explain written language so that it isn't misunderstood.

When you're out looking at the work of other photographers, in order to find the stuff you really like, you have to look at some that you don't like too. Everything you find in books, catalogs, galleries, museums, curatorial departments, etc can't all be just wonderful - some of it has to fall outside your realm of what you like. This begs the question: If you don't know what's bad, how do you know what's good?

So my suggestion is to use what you don't like, since you're there, running across it anyway, to define and reinforce your aesthetic for what you do like, because it helps to define you as an art observer. Since you have to glance at it to determine that you don't like it anyway. :)

Or do whatever you want. I'm just speaking my mind, as I'm sure you are. Like you I prefer to seek out the work of others that I really love, since that's what really inspires me. But I certainly don't like everything I come across, even from great established artists, which makes me wonder why, and asking questions is good.

keithwms
02-23-2012, 12:30 AM
I was going to recommend Burtynsky, but he's already been mentioned. So I won't mention that you should revisit Burtynsky ;)

Actually, I think it's important to look at things that challenge you.

Tim Boehm
02-23-2012, 12:31 AM
You might enjoy these photographers:
http://www.paulwakefield.co.uk/
http://www.charlescramer.com
http://michaeljamesbrown.com/gallery_all.html
http://www.kenduncan.com/index.php/gallery
http://www.kosoff.com/images.asp?id=1
http://jefffrancis.com/MainHomeFrameset.html
http://dannyburk.com/
http://www.paul-armitage.com/
http://www.maxtaylor.com/php/index.php
http://www.rod-mclean.com/3/GalleryMain.asp?GalleryID=76381&AKey=9A789DKQ

Trakl
03-06-2012, 09:52 AM
Richard Misrach?

And for something a little different -- not to everyone's taste, certainly, but I think her work is fascinating -- Beate Gutschow. Mentioning her name also has the pleasant side-effect of doubling the number of female photographers mentioned so far in this thread, I think?

MamiyaJen
03-06-2012, 05:28 PM
Richard Misrach?

And for something a little different -- not to everyone's taste, certainly, but I think her work is fascinating -- Beate Gutschow. Mentioning her name also has the pleasant side-effect of doubling the number of female photographers mentioned so far in this thread, I think?

oooh she's new to me but thank you i am loving her work! :D

welly
03-06-2012, 08:19 PM
A few to start...

http://www.barnbaum.com/barnbaum/Home.html
http://www.stulevyphoto.com/
http://www.donkirby.com/
http://www.michaelkenna.net/

This should get you going.

Best regards,

Bob

Thanks for turning me on to Bruce Barnbaum! Absolutely outstanding portfolio. Love it.

stillpositive
03-15-2012, 09:24 AM
I've just taken a look at Shane Lynams work. I like it and repect the artistic practice and approach that informs it. This work starts from a concept, is informed by a personal aesthetic and presented in an artistic folio format. It has cultural and undercurrents of socio-political themes so isn't just a nice picture of trees or a hill side. In some ways its more diffecult taking this concept approach because you have to observe and edit towards a specific objective while of course remaining somewhat openminded if some preconceived notion isn't borne out in the images.

I wish you look in the formulation of your own concepts to explore.