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  1. Laurent's Avatar
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    I'm not sure sloppiness is an advantage, at least in some parts of the hobby. I will not pretend I'm a master developer, but at least making sure my baths are at a temperature I know and can repeat has the great advantage that I have a fairly good idea of what will be needed to contact-print them.

    Concerning horizon line, may be shots fitting your style are better with some tilt... So this might not be sloppiness ?
  2. Laurent's Avatar
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    I started FB printing two weeks ago, and I agree it's more work. BUT the result is so much better (I compared prints of the same neg, printed the same day, in the same fresh developer) that I might give up on RC in a while...

    At the moment I don't think I'll do because I have to be ready for a show in less than two months and have 40+ prints to produce, but as soon as I have a chance to reorganize this darkroom I'll sure do more FB than RC...
  3. Laurent's Avatar
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    I think you're a really bad guy !!! Now she WILL have to start her own darkroom, and we all know too well how it turns from this point !!!
  4. jnanian's Avatar
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    good stuff CW
    -J
  5. TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I realize that fiber paper is more work than RC, but when I had the chance to switch to fiber, I did and never looked back. The end result was so far superior in my eye that I wondered why I started with RC to begin with. I know why - everyone was telling me "learn to print with RC". There are a couple of things you can do to help deal with the fiber paper issues you've got. First, get rid of the speed easel, and get a proper 4-blade. Second, get good drying screens - you can make them easily enough out of fiberglass window screen material if you are handy. Your fiber paper will still curl, especially if you dry it quickly. Dry the prints face down, so that they will resist the natural urge to curl. To flatten them, just get two pieces of 1/2" plywood cut to the biggest size you print, plus an inch or two in each dimension. Seal the plywood with a good urethane varnish so it's nice and smooth and water resistant. Put the prints you want to flatten between the plywood sheets, then stack some books on top. Let sit overnight, and you're good to go. Failing that, for smaller prints (11x14 and smaller), a clean, lint-free cotton T-shirt and a household iron work wonders. Put the print inside the T-shirt, set the iron on high, and iron away. Just keep the iron moving and don't let it sit in one spot for too long so it doesn't scorch the print (thus the t-shirt).
  6. David William White's Avatar
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    Pat on the back from me, your loan might just do the trick. But...why do you have your enlarger at the store?
  7. jnanian's Avatar
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    a lot of galleries and collectors care ... they would rather have something that is known to have archival properties
    than a RC print. i say this, knowing even that Digital C Prints ( light jet ) which are one of the few non-ink ways
    of getting a color image printed, are on something like RC paper .. maybe not exactly the same but close ...
    color papers are said to last about 75 years ....
    i think if you like printing on rc you should and maybe make a fiber back up once in a while.
    after a while you might like printing fiber as much or better than rc. but do what YOU want ...
    some say that RC papers if processed correctly are as archival as fiber prints, who knows if they are or not ..

    i know what you mean about ease of use.
    i have printed on fiber for 25-30 years. during that time for about a year
    i printed pr photos day after day after day for almost a year for a portrait photographer.
    fiber prints once in a while for commissioned work .. but for bread/butter it was all rc.
    these days have started printing on rc paper and enjoying it ( making prints for family mostly )
    and i have been wondering why after all these years i didn't do it more often

    john
  8. Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Congratulations, Scott! Well deserved.
  9. geneacom's Avatar
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    OK, I understand ...
  10. TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Yes it is, but you would need to attach some kind of margin to your negative, or punch holes in it. I also don't like the idea of making holes in my paper, as I like to use the entire sheet, including the edges, as part of my image.


 

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