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Blog Comments

  1. lxdude's Avatar
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    Oooohh, that Rita!
  2. lxdude's Avatar
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    Good on ya, dude!
  3. Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    I'm a photo junkie. There just happen to be a lot of first timers and no come backers. Lots of customers and no clientele. Go figure.
  4. Shadowtracker's Avatar
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    aaahh yeah... the old "the first one is free" trick.....
  5. Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Thanks, guys. As to my enlarger at the store, all I have is a 22 sq ft downstairs half-privy for a darkroom and the Fujimoto fits just fine (and barely). That Beseler is a monster. I would need to learn to defy gravity while it sat on the floor in order to use it. Also, to be inverted for prolonged periods of time without passing out.
  6. jmxphoto's Avatar
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    Thanks for everyone's feedback! I did a run of 8 FB prints yesterday and they all had the same problem. Paper curl in the development tray made for odd lines at the sides. Turns out you need to start with at least 4L/1gal (maybe more) of developer with 16x20 fiber and I started with 3L. It's discouraging because it took so long to turn out garbage. I'm still on the fence though I don't know how much longer I can be. I'm running low on 16x20 paper.

    @TheFlyingCamera I'd love a 4 blade 16x20 easel, but the speed easel was all I could afford at the time. I have decent drying screens like you've described. I've also hung them back to back with ok results. Still, they're not flat when they're done. Might have to try the press. For 11x14 and smaller prints I use what I call a ghetto press. It's a FB print dryer and I sandwich the prints between ferrotyping plates to keep any nasties off them. It works probably about as well as ironing in a T shirt.

    There is a good reason to learn on RC, namely that it takes about half as long to churn out a print. This makes it possible to learn more quickly. There's not a whole ton of learning to be done while a print sits in chemicals for 10min so why not duck that down to 5? Also RC doesn't eat chems like fiber. That stuff soaks up developer like a sponge! So if you're making "learning" prints why go through more chems than you have to and spend more time than necessary?
  7. Laurent's Avatar
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    I'm not sure sloppiness is an advantage, at least in some parts of the hobby. I will not pretend I'm a master developer, but at least making sure my baths are at a temperature I know and can repeat has the great advantage that I have a fairly good idea of what will be needed to contact-print them.

    Concerning horizon line, may be shots fitting your style are better with some tilt... So this might not be sloppiness ?
  8. Laurent's Avatar
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    I started FB printing two weeks ago, and I agree it's more work. BUT the result is so much better (I compared prints of the same neg, printed the same day, in the same fresh developer) that I might give up on RC in a while...

    At the moment I don't think I'll do because I have to be ready for a show in less than two months and have 40+ prints to produce, but as soon as I have a chance to reorganize this darkroom I'll sure do more FB than RC...
  9. Laurent's Avatar
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    I think you're a really bad guy !!! Now she WILL have to start her own darkroom, and we all know too well how it turns from this point !!!
  10. jnanian's Avatar
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    good stuff CW
    -J


 

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